Among the many things we have to be thankful about this Thanksgiving is never having to watch another live broadcast featuring Charlie Rose.

As all the world now knows, feminist champion Rose, formerly of PBS and CBS, is something of a horn dog.

Apparently, he has been a chronic abuser of vulnerable women since he first acquired power over young people eager to get ahead in the world of media.

What the world does not know is that Rose has also been a chronic abuser of our vulnerable planet, at least since he played PBS well enough to acquire the means to abuse the planet.

Abuse, in this latter case, is in the eyes of the beholder. Those who think the climate-change movement has long since reached the point of hysteria are not overly troubled by the size of Rose’s “carbon footprint.”

Those, however, who take footprint size seriously ought to be more troubled by Rose’s various holdings than by Rose’s various gropings.

After all, as talk-show guest Leo DiCaprio told an approving Rose on one appearance, “This is the biggest problem mankind has ever had to face.” And DiCaprio’s “this” wasn’t sexual harassment.

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According to Fortune magazine, Rose owns a large house in Henderson, North Carolina, and a 5,500-square-foot summer home on Long Island.

To put the Long Island house in perspective, it is more than twice as big as the average American home. That is a lot of air-conditioning.

According to Newsweek, Rose purchased a 525-acre farm in Oxford, North Carolina, he uses as a country retreat. He even gave it a name, “Grassy Creek Farm.”

According to the Charlotte News & Observer, Rose also has an apartment overlooking Central Park in New York City as well as apartments in Washington, D.C., and Paris.

Rose burns a whole lot of carbon not only to maintain his properties but also to get from one to the other. Rose, of course, does not fly commercial.

True, private jets can burn a coal mine full of carbon, but for a guy like Rose they have advantages that transcend convenience.

Reah Bravo knows all about this. She was an intern on Rose’s show in 2007 and endured the full Charlie, including naked perambulations around his hotel room.

On one occasion, as the New York Daily News reports, “The two got on a small private jet, and Rose got out of his seat and pressed himself against Bravo.”

“I felt at a loss,” Bravo told the Daily News. “I mean, what am I going to do? We were how many feet up in the air?” Can’t do that sort of thing on commercial, can one?

Bravo also told of working at Rose’s “private waterfront estate” on Long Island. You would think that a guy worried, in his words, about “catastrophic climate change” would not want a home anywhere near the water. Not so. Not Charlie.

Although Rose has used his various platforms to promote climate-change alarmism, he appears to have worried about his carbon footprint only when he was on the air.

To watch him and DiCaprio – the man who chartered a 737 to take his buddies to Australia to celebrate New Years early – trade anxieties about the planet makes their otherwise insufferable conversation at least vaguely amusing.

On his PBS show in 2014, Rose grilled the foreign minister of France, Laurent Fabius, on climate change. On this occasion, Rose was more earnest and anxious than ever.

“Where is the resistance?” he pleaded. “What stands in the way of something that clearly threatens the planet?”

Much of that resistance comes from the same people who resist militant feminism. These are the people who know enough not to take pious grandstanders like Charlie Rose seriously.

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