Keynote speaker addresses Islamist fundraising conference in Springfield, Virginia, Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017.

Keynote speaker from Pakistan addresses Islamist fundraising conference in Springfield, Virginia, on Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017. Photo/Rabwah Times

Radical imams from Virginia, Maryland and Texas recently attended a fund-raising event organized by an Islamist charity in which they were treated to a smorgasbord of teachings from foreign-based Islamic thinkers.

The prime delicacy was offered up by keynote speaker Habib-ur-Rehman Ludhianvi, a visiting Islamic cleric from Pakistan.

Ludhiavi believes America is a “land of infidels,” whom he described as “ignorant.” His comments are a ringing example of what Muslim leaders say when they are behind closed doors and in the company of other Muslims, as opposed to the public comments meant for gullible infidel ears, security experts tell WND.

Ehsan Rehan fled his native Pakistan and works as a journalist in Washington, D.C.

Ehsan Rehan fled his native Pakistan and works as a journalist in Washington, D.C.

The only reason the public knows what was said inside the Nov. 18 conference at a Holiday Inn in Springfield, Virginia, is because the gathering was infiltrated by Ehsan Rehan, the brave Pakistani-born journalist and editor of Rabwah Times who went undercover and captured video and audio.

The keynote speaker, Ludhianavi, is leader of the Islamic seminary Dar-ul-Uloom, which is based in Pakistan but operates branches in the United States, Canada and the U.K., including one in St. Paul, Minnesota, that opened in a former Catholic church in 2014. There’s another in Lawrenceville, Georgia, and others in Warren, Michigan, and San Bernardino, California.

On 12 Mile Road in Warren, the Darul Uloom Islamic Center and School is one of many Dar ul-Uloom madrassas that former Homeland Security officer and whistleblower Philip Haney has tracked and described as radical. Haney said San Bernardino terrorist Syed Farooq attended a Dar ul-Uloom mosque in that city and exchanged repeated text messages with the mosque’s imam in the months leading up to his attack on an office Christmas party that killed 14 Americans in December 2015.

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Darul ul-Uloom mosque on 12 Mile Road in Warren

Darul ul-Uloom mosque on 12 Mile Road in Warren, Michigan

The Dar ul-Uloom mosque in San Bernardino is a haven for activists involved with Tablighi Jamaat – a fundamentalist, proselytizing Islamic sect known in some circles as the “Army of Darkness.”

“Dar ul-Uloom are the evangelists of the Islamic world,” Haney told WND. “They emphasize children memorizing the Quran.”

According to its website, “Darul Uloom Michigan has been sincerely serving the Muslim community since its inception, and by the grace of Allah (subhanahu wa ta‘ala), it is now a notable Islamic seminary with students of all ages from across North America.”

At the Virginia conference, Ludhianvi advised a sort of carrot and stick approach to conquering American minds for Islam, starting with heretical Muslims who don’t believe in jihad. He said:

They are ignorant and there is no need for dialogue with them, God has given them two options, one is the holy book and one is the stick and if one does not accept the holy book they have to be forced.

The imam’s use of the word “stick” should not be overlooked.

On the same day Ludhianavi was speaking at the conference in Virginia, another U.S. Muslim leader, Jaylani Hussein, was speaking at a symposium in St. Cloud, Minnesota, where he told a group gathered at the public library:

I understand that our organization [CAIR] comes under threat. I know why we come under attack. It’s not because of our silence. It’s because we carry a big stick.

Conference-goers in Springfield, Virginia. Photo courtesy Ehsan Rehan/Rabwah Times.

Conference-goers in Springfield, Virginia. Photo courtesy Ehsan Rehan/Rabwah Times.

It’s no coincidence that Muslim leaders are talking about using the “stick” to whip American infidels into shape, says Rehman, the journalist who went undercover at the day-long event in Springfield, Virginia.

“The word ‘stick’ in Urdu is a common term used in south Asia to reference the use of force,” Rehan told WND in an email.

Rehan said he went undercover into Islamist meetings in his native Pakistan before he was forced to flee the country.

“Due to threats from these organizations I had to flee the country twice, once in 2009 and then the last time in 2012,” Rehan said. He now works out of Washington, D.C.

Even other Muslims who eschew jihad are under threat from mainstream Sunni Islam in America.

Among the “infidels” named at the Springfield conference was the moderate Shia sect of Ahmadiyya, who believe in a prophet who came after Muhammad and are therefore considered heretical by the majority of mainstream Muslims.

Here is one of the tweets from journalist Rehan that includes video from the conference:

Commenting on the dangers faced by Islam, Ludhianvi said:

“The biggest threat that Islam is facing today is the disruption of the family system, for which they [west] are urging women to go out of their homes.”

Last year in his magazine, Ludhainvi issued a fatwa (decree) stating that the “use of cellphone by women in public places was against Islam” and so was wearing “high heel shoes.”

The Georgia Islamic Institute and mosque is part of the Dar ul-Ulam network of mosques, headed by a Pakistani imam.

The Georgia Islamic Institute and mosque in Lawrenceville, Georgia, is part of the Dar ul-Uloom network of mosques and madrasas, headed by a radical Pakistani imam. Photo/Leo Hohmann

The event in Springfield was organized by two U.S. registered charities, Idara Dawat-O-Irshad and Khatme Nubuwwat Center, both of which enjoy IRS tax-exempt status.

The registration desk in the hotel was manned by teenagers who displayed flyers and posters denouncing the founder of the moderate Ahmadiyya sect. An exhibition booth lined with posters urged Muslims to not vote for “non-Muslim candidates.”

The event particularly targeted the Ahmadis, about 15,000 to 20,000 of whom reside in the United States, many of them refugees from Muslim-majority countries where they are persecuted. Many of the conference speakers accused the Ahmadis of being “infidels” and criticized them for having “abolished jihad,” according to Rehan’s undercover report.

During a question-and-answer session, Ludhianvi warned the U.S. government to “stop giving refuge to the adherents of the Qadiani faith [Ahmadis],” who he claimed were worse than Jews and Christians.

The conference ended with organizers urging the attendees to donate $100 each to pay for the expenses of the “cause,” Rehan noted. The organizers also thanked the “Karahi Kabob” restaurant owner for providing free food to the conference attendees.

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