Google prides itself in accumulating everything worth knowing so that it can help you get the information you need at a moment’s notice.

But, if you want to stump Google Home, try this: Ask who Jesus is.

David Sams of Nashville tried, and Google Home’s response was: “I don’t think I can help you with that.”

How about Jesus Christ – possibly the most familiar name in the world? “I don’t think I can help you with that.”

How about God: “I don’t think I can help you with that.”

The story was covered by Fox 17 in Nashville. When the station asked Google about the oversight, the purveyor of all knowledge issued a statement:

“The reason the Google Assistant didn’t respond with information about ‘Who is Jesus’ or ‘Who is Jesus Christ’ wasn’t out of disrespect but instead to ensure respect. Some of the Assistant’s spoken responses come from the web, and for certain topics, this content can be more vulnerable to vandalism and spam. If our systems detect such circumstances, the Assistant might not reply. If similar vulnerabilities were detected for other questions – including those about other religious leaders – the Assistant also wouldn’t respond. We’re exploring different solutions and temporarily disabling these responses for religious figures on the Assistant.”

In other words, Google can be perfectly objective about everything except God or Jesus. Got it?

Yet, with all the knowledge Google accumulates about each of us, I wonder why it can’t just tell us what we want to hear?

I remember reading a few years ago that Google wanted to be expertly responsive to individual requests as vague as, “What should I do today?”

You might think Google would want to know about people’s religious beliefs and practices. What if the best answer was, “Go to church” or “Go to Bible study”?

What if the best answer was, “Go to church” or “Go to Bible study”?


Have you read Joseph Farah’s “The Restitution of All Things” yet? This is not Google Answer asking you. It’s your friends at WND Answer. Ask us about “The Restitution of All Things and we’ll tell you it is a unique book about the Kingdom of God and what it will be like when Jesus is reigning and ruling.


By the way, it’s not that Google doesn’t know anything about Jesus. Google Home refers to Jesus when asked about the Last Supper and even Saint Peter. And, according to the report, there’s plenty of willingness to sound off on Muhammad, Buddha – even Satan.

May I give you my theory?

There are very few Christians working at Google in positions of influence and authority.

There are very few conservatives working at Google in positions of influence and authority.

There are very few non-“progressives” working at Google.

There are very few employees at Google who even know Christians, conservatives and non-“progressives.” It’s a world Google just doesn’t know – or care to know.

And that’s the problem.

Google claims to treasure diversity. But it’s a lie. Google may treasure racial diversity, gender diversity and other kinds of diversity that reflects the superficial outer person. But Google is currently facing massive lawsuits for firing employees and harassing them for their political views, their cultural views and their social views.

Is that shocking?

It shouldn’t be. When liberals and so-called “progressives” talk about diversity and tolerance, it only goes so far. It never has to do with ideology, politics and religion. Google flat-out hates that kind of diversity – the only kind that really matters, at the end of the day.

Google’s not alone. It may be one of the wealthiest corporations in the world. It may know more about you than the National Security Agency and the IRS combined. But it didn’t get there by playing by anyone’s rules but its own.

And one thing I can promise you: There’s one person who knows more than Google. And maybe that’s why Google algorithms go haywire when someone asks who that person is.

 

 

 

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