Last week, I was prowling around on the internet trying to find the dates of the U.S. Open when I stumbled across an announcement for the upcoming “PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship.”

The very name caught my eye. Why would minority golfers need their own tournament, especially one sponsored by the PGA and likely endorsed by the NCAA?

Golf is not swimming. There is not even a rumor abroad that minorities are somehow genetically disadvantaged when it comes to swinging a golf club.

If there were such a rumor, the story of Tiger Woods would seem to have put it to rest. And campus SJWs should note that Woods emerged without benefit of a country club background.

The goal of the tournament founders, I read, was “to provide a national stage for players from minority colleges and universities to compete in NCAA collegiate golf events.”

By minority, the founders meant “historically black colleges and universities” or HBCUs. The PGA-sponsored tournament was launched about 30 years ago when many HBCUs were predominantly black.

Many HBCUs may still be largely black, but most of their golf teams are not. In 2017 the Wildcats of Bethune-Cookman University from Daytona Beach won the men’s Division I Minority Collegiate Golf Championship with an all-white team.

Bethune-Cookman is not an exception. Many HBCUs sport teams that are either all-white or all non-black. Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri, for instance, has a six-man team, all white, all American.

Tennessee State has an all-white team as well. So does Savannah State if the Indian guy from Britain counts as white.

Several HBCUs recruit their white guys from abroad. Georgia Regents University fields an 11-man team without a single African-American golfer.

The university does, however, have five white international players, two from Sweden, one from Australia, one from Great Britain, one from Canada.

Alcorn State has three white international golfers on its all-white team, but these three hail from South America.

The South Americans have an advantage over the guys from Sweden and Australia. They can compete in the Individual Invitational part of the PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship.

The white Europeans cannot. Neither can the white Americans, not even a one-legged Iraq veteran on free-or-reduced lunch who hails from the poorest, meth-riddled holler in eastern Kentucky.

The individual competition, the website announces proudly, is limited to participants who are “African-American, Hispanic-American, Middle Eastern/North African, Native or Alaskan American, Asian or Pacific Island American.”

In other words, the best players on many of the best HBCU teams would be banned from the individual championship based not on the color of the skin – the South Americans are as white as the Swedes – but on their non-Hispanic, European descent.

The 2017 individual winner of a tournament designed to boost the self-esteem of African-Americans was a fellow named Nabeel Khan from the University of Connecticut.

Given that these teams recruit from all around the world – God only knows on whose dime – roughly 90 percent of the earth’s inhabitants can one day look forward to participating in the individual competition.

The 10 percent who cannot are those forever tainted by their European blood. And that brings us to the question of how much white blood disqualifies a player.

If, say, a golfer presented himself Elizabeth Warren-style as an American Indian, would the tournament directors feel compelled to run a DNA test?

Indeed, if males can compete as females in athletic events by identifying as such, why could not a Swede declare himself a Somalian?

This year’s PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship begins May 11 in Port Lucie, Florida.

It should be worth attending. One might never see a better example of the absurd and unconstitutional diversity regime in action.

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