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Make a joke about skin color and you’re a racist. About gender orientation and you’re a “homophobe.” About Islam and you’re an “Islamophobe.”

But Christians are a fair target, apparently.

It happened at a Scottish state school where the parents of a 5-year-old report their daughter was bullied for saying grace before a meal.

Their names aren’t being reported to protect the girl, but the family lives in the Highlands.

The parents said their daughter was “happy” growing up but, but grew depressed and dreaded school after being mocked, over and over, for expressing her Christian beliefs.

Kate Forbes, a member of parliament, raised the issue recently, explaining her concern that schools are failing to address religious intolerance.

The Christian Institute noted the girl said “other children had been making fun of her praying to God.”

“We are still not 100 percent sure our daughter is over this,” the parents said.

“A 5-year-old saying grace before lunch is not hurting anyone and she should be free to do that,” said Forbes. “I do think it is becoming more difficult for people with faith and that means that the schools and authorities have to do more to make sure schools are an inclusive environment.”

Free Church of Scotland minister Rev. Alasdair Macleod pointed out a “growing problem” of intolerance toward Christian students.

“It feels to me that schools are becoming an increasingly hostile environment for Christian pupils, and this hostility must stop,” he said. “Bullying, mocking or intimidation towards pupils on the basis of their Christian faith is unacceptable and needs to be recognized as such.”

The Scottish Catholic Observer reported Forbes’ call for a crackdown on intimidation of Christians.

She heard reports of the 5-year-old being bullied and of two teen sons of a minister being bullied by “Bible bashers.”

She previously told Britain’s Premier Christian Radio that the apparent objective is to “de-religionize” society in pursuit of utopia.

“What we need is to create environments where there is no hostility to people who are different but an understanding and welcome of difference,” she said. “Five-year-olds should be allowed to say a wee quick grace before lunch if they want to.”

John Swinnery, the deputy first minister, responded that the freedom of religious belief “must also apply in schools.”

A Highland Council spokeswoman warned, “Any bullying of any children for any reason is entirely unacceptable.”

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