Virginia Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe

Virginia Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe

A confessed pedophile who served prison time for threatening to assassinate the president of the United States is running for Congress in Virginia.

The candidacy of Nathan Larson, an independent, was made possible by former Democratic Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, who restored the rights of felons in 2016 to vote and run for office.

Larson, a 37-year old accountant, acknowledged to the HuffPost he is a pedophile who has bragged in website posts about raping his late ex-wife.

He confirmed he created now-defunct chat rooms that, the HuffPost said, “served as gathering places for pedophiles and violence-minded misogynists like himself.”

Larson explained why he’s running for the House seat.

“A lot of people are tired of political correctness and being constrained by it,” he said. “People prefer when there’s an outsider who doesn’t have anything to lose and is willing to say what’s on a lot of people’s minds.”

 The HuffPost asked him whether he’s a pedophile or just writes about pedophilia.

“It’s a mix of both,” Larson replied. “When people go over the top there’s a grain of truth to what they say.”

In 2009, Larson was sentenced to 16 months in prison for threatening to kill President Obama.

He wrote in a 2008 email to the Secret Service: “I am writing to inform you that in the near future, I will kill the President of the United States of America.”

Larson would not have been eligible to run for office or vote before August 2016, when McAuliffe, a longtime Clinton operative, restored the rights of some 13,000 felons.

McAuliffe, who is thought to be a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2020, initially issued a blanket clemency that restored the rights of  200,000 felons in April 2016.

But the state Supreme Court struck down the order, ruling McAuliffe exceeded his legal authority. The governor then trimmed the number.

McAuliffe was chairman of the Democratic National Committee, co-chairman of President Bill Clinton’s 1996 re-election campaign and chairman of Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign.

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