fcx123107-10k.htm
 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-K
 
(Mark One)
[X] ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2007
OR
[  ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from
 
to
Commission File Number: 1-9916
 
 
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
74-2480931
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(IRS Employer Identification No.)
   
One North Central Avenue
 
Phoenix, Arizona
85004-4414
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
 
(602) 366-8100
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $0.10 per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
7%  Convertible Senior Notes due 2011 of the registrant
 
New York Stock Exchange
6¾% Mandatory Convertible Preferred Stock, par value $0.10 per share
 
New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:  None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act             R Yes 0 No
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.        0 Yes R No
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.                                                                                    R Yes 0 No
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   0
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company.  See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  (Check one):  R Large accelerated filer 0 Accelerated filer 0 Non-accelerated filer 0 Smaller reporting company
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).                                  0 Yes R No
 
The aggregate market value of common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $35.0 billion on February 15, 2008, and approximately $31.3 billion on June 30, 2007.
 
Common stock issued and outstanding was 382,767,582 shares on February 15, 2008, and 381,655,613 shares on June 30, 2007.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of our Proxy Statement for our 2008 Annual Meeting are incorporated by reference into Part III (Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14) of this report.
 

 


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Table of Contents
PART I
Items 1. and 2. Business and Properties.

All of our periodic report filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, are available, free of charge, through our web site, www.fcx.com, including our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and any amendments to those reports. These reports and amendments are available through our web site as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file or furnish such material to the SEC.
 
References to “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc. (FCX) and its consolidated subsidiaries, including, except as otherwise stated, Phelps Dodge Corporation (Phelps Dodge) and its subsidiaries, which we acquired on March 19, 2007. References to “Notes” refer to the “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements” included in our 2007 Annual Report included herein (see Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data).

GENERAL

We are one of the world’s largest copper, gold and molybdenum mining companies in terms of reserves and production. Our principal asset is the Grasberg minerals district in Papua, Indonesia, which based on the latest available reserve data provided by third-party industry consultants, contains the largest single recoverable copper reserve and the largest single gold reserve of any mine in the world.
 
On March 19, 2007, we acquired Phelps Dodge, a fully integrated producer of copper and molybdenum, with mines in North and South America, processing capabilities for other by-product minerals and several development projects, including Tenke Fungurume in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).
 
In North America we have six operating copper mines – Morenci, Bagdad, Sierrita and Safford in Arizona, and Chino and Tyrone in New Mexico, as well as one operating molybdenum mine – Henderson in Colorado.  In addition, we have announced plans to restart the Miami copper mine in Arizona, and the Climax molybdenum mine in Colorado. All of these operations are wholly owned, except for Morenci, in which we have an 85 percent joint venture interest. The North American mining operations are operated in an integrated fashion and have long-lived reserves with additional development potential.
 
In South America we have four operating copper mines – Cerro Verde in Peru, and Candelaria, Ojos del Salado and El Abra in Chile. We own a 53.56 percent interest in Cerro Verde, 80 percent interests in Candelaria and Ojos del Salado, and a 51 percent interest in El Abra.
 
In Indonesia we own 90.64 percent of PT Freeport Indonesia, including 9.36 percent owned through our wholly owned subsidiary, PT Indocopper Investama. The Government of Indonesia owns the remaining 9.36 percent of PT Freeport Indonesia.  PT Freeport Indonesia operates under an agreement called a Contract of Work with the Government of Indonesia.  The Contract of Work permits us to conduct exploration, mining and production activities in a 24,700-acre area called Block A, which includes the Grasberg mineral district. Under the Contract of Work, PT Freeport Indonesia also conducts exploration activities (which had been suspended, but resumed in 2007) in an approximate 500,000-acre area called Block B.
 
In Africa, we have a 57.75 percent interest in the Tenke Fungurume project in the DRC.  The Tenke Fungurume mine will produce copper and cobalt and is expected to commence mining operations in 2009.
 
Our mining revenue for 2007 (pro forma to include the operations of Phelps Dodge before the acquisition), includes sales of copper (approximately 79 percent), molybdenum (approximately 11 percent) and gold (approximately 6 percent).  Our consolidated copper production (on a proforma basis to include the operations of Phelps Dodge before the acquisition) was primarily from three mines, the Grasberg minerals district in Indonesia (approximately 30 percent), the Morenci mine in Arizona (approximately 18 percent), and the Cerro Verde mine in Peru (approximately 15 percent).
 
For information about our segments and geographic areas see Note 18.

 
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The locations of our operating mines, as well those in development are shown on the map below.
 
 
As a mining company, our principal assets are our reserves. At December 31, 2007, consolidated recoverable proven and probable reserves totaled 93.2 billion pounds of copper, 41.0 million ounces of gold, 2.0 billion pounds of molybdenum, 230.9 million ounces of silver and 0.6 billion pounds of cobalt. Approximately 40 percent of our copper reserves were in Indonesia, approximately 28 percent were in South America, approximately 27 percent were in North America and approximately five percent were in Africa.  Approximately 96 percent of our gold reserves were in Indonesia, with our remaining gold reserves in South America. Our molybdenum reserves are primarily in North America (approximately 90 percent), with our remaining molybdenum reserves in South America.  (See “Ore Reserves”).
 
The diagram below shows our corporate structure.

 
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NORTH AMERICA

Our North American mining operations comprise copper operations from mining through rod production, molybdenum operations from mining through conversion to chemical and metallurgical products, and the marketing and sale of both product lines. We have six operating copper mines in North America – Morenci, Bagdad, Sierrita, Safford, Chino and Tyrone, and one operating molybdenum mine – Henderson. Additionally, in December 2007, we announced our plan to restart the Climax molybdenum mine and in January 2008, our plan to restart our Miami mine.  Our North American mining division also includes rod and refining operations, which consist of copper conversion facilities including a smelter, refinery, rod mills and a specialty copper products facility.
 
Following are maps and descriptions of our North American mining operations:
 
Morenci and Safford

 
Morenci. Morenci, the largest copper mine in North America, is an open-pit copper mining complex located in Greenlee County, Arizona, approximately 50 miles northeast of Safford on U.S. Highway 191. The site is accessible by a paved highway and a railway spur. We own an 85 percent interest in Morenci, and 15 percent is owned by affiliates of Sumitomo Corporation. Each partner takes in kind its share of Morenci’s production. The open-pit mine has been in continuous operation since 1939 and previously was mined through underground workings. The Morenci mine is a porphyry copper deposit that has leachable oxide and secondary sulfide mineralization, and millable primary sulfide mineralization. The predominant oxide copper mineral is chrysocolla. Chalcocite is the most important secondary copper sulfide mineral and chalcopyrite the dominant primary copper sulfide.
 
The Morenci operation consists of a 49,000 metric ton-per-day (54,000 short tons per day) concentrator that produces copper and molybdenum concentrate, an 80,000 metric ton-per-day crushed-ore leach pad and stacking system, a large low-grade run-of-mine (ROM) leaching system, four solution-extraction (SX) plants, and three electrowinning (EW) tank houses that produce copper cathode. Total EW tank house capacity is approximately 965 million pounds of copper per year. Total annual copper production over the next three years is expected to range between 790 to 990 million pounds (670 to 840 million pounds for our share) and total annual molybdenum production approximates one million pounds per year. Morenci uses a fleet of 115 235-metric ton haul trucks loaded by 15 shovels with bucket sizes ranging from 47 to 55 cubic meters, which are capable of moving an average of 1,000,000 metric tons of material per day.
 
The concentrate leach, direct-electrowinning facility at Morenci is ramping up production following commissioning in third-quarter 2007. This project uses our proprietary medium-temperature, pressure-leaching and direct-electrowinning technology, which will enhance cost savings by processing concentrates on-site instead of shipping concentrates to smelters for treatment and by providing acid as a by-product for use in leaching operations. The concentrate-leach project included the restart of a mill, which adds 115 million pounds of copper production per year and the mill is operating near capacity of 49,000 metric tons-per day.
 
 
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Morenci is located in a desert environment with rainfall averaging 13 inches per year. The highest bench elevation is 1,950 meters above sea level, and the ultimate pit bottom is expected to have an elevation of 900 meters above sea level. The Morenci operation encompasses approximately 53,944 acres comprising 47,609 acres of patented mining claims and other fee lands, 5,914 acres of unpatented mining claims, and 421 acres of land held by state or federal permits, easements and rights-of-way.
 
Morenci receives electrical power from Tucson Electric Power Company, Arizona Public Service, and the Luna Energy Facility in Deming, New Mexico (in which we own a one-third interest). Although we believe the Morenci operation has sufficient water sources to support mining operations as currently planned, we are a party to litigation that could adversely affect our water rights at Morenci and at our other properties in Arizona. (Refer to Item 3, Legal Proceedings, for information concerning the status of these proceedings.)
 
Safford.  The Safford project is an open-pit copper mining complex located in Graham County, Arizona, approximately eight miles north of the town of Safford and 170 miles east of Phoenix. The site is accessible by paved county road off U.S. Highway 70. The project construction is essentially complete, and initial production commenced in late 2007 with a ramp up to full production of 240 million pounds of copper per year expected in the first half of 2008. The Safford mine includes two porphyry copper deposits that have leachable oxide and secondary sulfide mineralization. The predominant oxide copper minerals are chrysocolla and copper-bearing iron oxides. Chalcocite is the most important secondary copper sulfide mineral.
 
The property is a mine-for-leach project and produces copper cathodes. The operation will consist of two open pits feeding a crushing facility with a capacity of 103,000 metric tons per day of crushed ore. The crushed ore is delivered to a single leach pad by a series of overland and portable conveyors. ROM ore is placed on the leach pad by trucks. Leach solutions feed an SX/EW facility with a capacity of 240 million pounds of copper per year. Average annual copper production over the next three years is expected to range between 205 to 240 million pounds. The mining fleet consists of 17 235-metric ton haul trucks, expanding to 21 trucks by the end of 2008, loaded by five shovels with bucket sizes ranging from 31 to 34 cubic meters, which are capable of moving an average of approximately 285,000 metric tons per day.
 
Safford is located in a desert environment with rainfall averaging 10 inches per year. The highest bench elevation is expected to be 1,350 meters above sea level, and the ultimate pit bottom is expected to have an elevation of 750 meters above sea level. The Safford operation encompasses approximately 24,957 acres comprising 20,994 acres of patented lands, 3,932 acres of unpatented lands and 31 acres of land held by federal permit.
 
The Safford project receives electrical power through the Southwest Transmission Cooperative, a subsidiary of Arizona Electric Power Cooperative, Inc. Although we believe the Safford operation has sufficient water resources to support mining operations as currently planned, we are a party to litigation that could adversely impact the water rights at Safford and at our other properties in Arizona.  (Refer to Item 3, Legal Proceedings, for information concerning the status of these proceedings.)

 
Bagdad
 
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Bagdad is an open-pit copper and molybdenum mining complex located in Yavapai County in west-central Arizona. It is approximately 60 miles west of Prescott and 100 miles northwest of Phoenix.  The property can be reached by Arizona Highway 96, which ends at the town of Bagdad. The closest railroad siding is at Hillside, Arizona, approximately 24 miles southeast on Arizona Highway 96. The open-pit mining operation has been ongoing since 1945, and prior mining was conducted through underground workings. The Bagdad mine is a porphyry copper deposit that has leachable oxide and secondary sulfide mineralization, and millable primary sulfide mineralization. The predominant oxide copper minerals are chrysocolla, malachite and azurite. Chalcocite is the most important secondary copper sulfide mineral, and chalcopyrite and molybdenite the dominant primary sulfides.
 
The Bagdad operation consists of a 75,000 metric ton-per-day concentrator that produces copper and molybdenum concentrates, and an SX/EW plant that produces copper cathode from solution generated by low-grade ROM leaching and from conversion of a portion of mill copper concentrates in a concentrate-leach plant. The majority of concentrate produced is smelted at our Miami, Arizona, facility. Additionally, up to 35 million pounds per year are produced as cathode from the SX/EW and concentrate-leach plants and up to 20 million pounds per year from the ROM leaching system. Total projected annual copper production over the next three years is expected to range from 200 to 225  million pounds. Molybdenum production at the Bagdad mill ranges from 8 million to 11 million pounds per year. The current mining fleet has the capacity to move in excess of 180,000 metric tons of material per day using 25 235-metric ton haul trucks loaded by seven shovels with bucket sizes ranging from 20 to 47 cubic meters.
 
In 2002, we constructed a high-temperature, concentrate-leaching demonstration plant designed to recover 35 million pounds of commercial-grade copper cathode annually from chalcopyrite concentrates. The facility is the first of its kind in the world to use high-temperature, pressure leaching to process chalcopyrite concentrates. During 2005, this facility was used to test and demonstrate medium-temperature, pressure leaching and direct-electrowinning technology, which is now used at the Morenci concentrate-leaching facility, and was converted back to high-temperature, pressure leaching in December 2005. In December 2007, we announced plans to convert this facility to a molybdenum concentrate leach facility by 2010, which is expected to increase our annual molybdenum processing capacity by approximately 20 million pounds.
 
Bagdad is located in a desert environment with rainfall averaging 15 inches per year. The highest bench elevation is 1,200 meters above sea level, and the ultimate pit bottom is expected to be 475 meters above sea level. The Bagdad operation encompasses approximately 21,743 acres comprising 21,143 acres of patented mining claims and other fee lands, and 600 acres of unpatented mining claims.
 
Bagdad receives electrical power from Arizona Public Service Company. Although we believe the Bagdad operation has sufficient water resources to support mining operations as currently planned, we are a party to litigation that could adversely affect our water rights at Bagdad and at our other properties in Arizona.  (Refer to Item 3, Legal Proceedings, for information concerning the status of these proceedings.)

Sierrita
 

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Sierrita is an open-pit copper and molybdenum mining complex located in Pima County, Arizona, approximately 20 miles southwest of Tucson and seven miles west of the town of Green Valley and Interstate Highway 19.  The site is accessible by a paved highway and by rail. The mine has been in operation since 1959. The Sierrita mine is a porphyry copper deposit that has leachable oxide and secondary sulfide mineralization, and millable primary sulfide mineralization. The predominant oxide copper minerals are malachite, azurite and chrysocolla. Chalcocite is the most important secondary copper sulfide mineral, and chalcopyrite and molybdenite the dominant primary sulfides.
 
The Sierrita operation consists of a 102,000 metric ton-per-day concentrator, two molybdenum roasters and a rhenium processing facility. The facility produces copper and molybdenum concentrates. Sierrita also produces copper from a ROM oxide-leaching system. Cathode copper is plated at the Twin Buttes EW facility which has a design capacity of approximately 50 million pounds of copper per year. In 2004, a copper sulfate crystal plant began production. The facility has the capacity to produce 40 million pounds of copper sulfate per year. Total annual copper production over the next three years is expected to range from 155 to 190 million pounds. Molybdenum production averages approximately 20 million pounds per year. The molybdenum facility consists of a leaching circuit, two molybdenum roasters and a packaging facility. The molybdenum facilities process Sierrita concentrate, concentrate from our other mines and concentrate from third-party sources. The current mining fleet has the capacity to move an average of 200,000 metric tons of material per day using 23 210- to 235-metric ton haul trucks loaded by five shovels with bucket sizes ranging from 21 to 47 cubic meters.
 
Sierrita is located in a desert environment with rainfall averaging 12 inches per year. The highest bench elevation is 1,350 meters above sea level, and the ultimate pit bottom is expected to be 600 meters above sea level. The Sierrita operation encompasses approximately 22,320 acres comprising 14,400 acres of patented mining claims and other fee lands, 5,725 acres of unpatented mining claims (includes 3,655 acres overlaying federal minerals on previously counted fee lands), and 2,195 acres of leased lands.
 
Sierrita receives electrical power through long-term contracts with the Tucson Electric Power Company. Although we believe the Sierrita operation has sufficient water resources to support mining operations as currently planned, we are a party to litigation that could adversely affect our water rights at Sierrita and at our other properties in Arizona.  (Refer to Item 3, Legal Proceedings, for information concerning the status of these proceedings.)

Miami
 
Miami is an open-pit copper mining complex located in Gila County, Arizona, approximately 90 miles east of Phoenix and six miles west of the city of Globe on U.S. Highway 60. The site is accessible by a paved highway and by rail. The Miami mining operation has been on care-and-maintenance status since 2002, but has historically processed copper ore using both flotation and leaching technologies since about 1915. Since 2002, residual leaching of stockpiles has continued with copper recovered by the SX/EW process. The Miami mine is a porphyry copper deposit that has leachable oxide and secondary sulfide
 
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mineralization. The predominant oxide copper minerals are chrysocolla, copper-bearing clays, malachite and azurite. Chalcocite and covellite are the most important secondary copper sulfide minerals.

The design capacity of the SX/EW plant is 200 million pounds per year.  In January 2008, we announced our plan to restart the Miami mine. We expect full rates of production to approximate 100 million pounds of copper per year.  Refer to “Development and Exploration” for further discussion.

The Miami smelter processes concentrate primarily from Bagdad, Sierrita, Morenci and Chino and has been in production for over 80 years. The smelter has been upgraded during that period to implement new technologies, to improve production and to comply with current air quality standards. Concentrate processed through the smelter totaled approximately 759,000 metric tons in 2007 and 612,000 metric tons in 2006. Sulfuric acid is a by-product of smelting concentrates, and the Miami smelter is the most significant source of sulfuric acid for our domestic leaching operations. The Miami rod plant treats cathodes from Miami and other domestic operations and produces approximately 316 million pounds of copper rod per year.
 
Miami is located in a desert environment with rainfall averaging approximately 18 inches per year. The highest bench elevation is 1,400 meters above sea level, and the ultimate pit bottom is expected to be 800 meters above sea level. The Miami operation encompasses approximately 9,058 acres comprising 8,725 acres of patented mining claims and other fee lands, and 333 acres of unpatented mining claims.
 
Miami receives electrical power through long-term contracts with the Salt River Project and natural gas through long-term contracts with El Paso Natural Gas. Although we believe the Miami operation has sufficient water resources to support mining operations as currently planned, we are a party to litigation that could adversely affect our water rights at Miami and at our other properties in Arizona.  (Refer to Item 3, Legal Proceedings, for information concerning the status of these proceedings.)

Chino and Tyrone

 
Chino. Chino is an open-pit copper mining complex located in southwestern New Mexico in Grant County, approximately 15 miles east of the town of Silver City off of State Highway 180. The mine is accessible by paved roads and by rail. Chino has been in operation since 1910. The Chino mine is a porphyry copper deposit with adjacent copper skarn deposits. There is leachable oxide and secondary sulfide mineralization, and millable primary sulfide mineralization. The predominant oxide copper minerals are chrysocolla and azurite. Chalcocite is the most important secondary copper sulfide mineral, and chalcopyrite and molybdenite the dominant primary sulfides.
 
The Chino operation consists of a 39,000 metric ton-per-day concentrator that produces copper and molybdenum concentrates, and a 150 million pound-per-year SX/EW plant that produces copper cathode from solution generated by ROM leaching. Total annual copper production over the next three years is expected to range from 180 to 245 million pounds, along with annual molybdenum production of approximately one million pounds. The current mining fleet has the capacity to move an average of 180,000 metric tons of material per day utilizing a fleet of 23 245- and 290-metric ton haul trucks loaded
 
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by eight shovels/loaders with bucket sizes ranging from 14 to 47 cubic meters. Copper ore is crushed and sent to the concentrator. Leach ore is placed on stockpiles located throughout the property and the leach solution is processed at Chino’s SX/EW facility that has a maximum capacity of 153 million pounds of copper cathode per year.
 
Chino is located in a desert environment with rainfall averaging 16 inches per year. The highest bench elevation is 2,250 meters above sea level, and the ultimate pit bottom is expected to be 1,500 meters above sea level. The Chino operation encompasses approximately 118,062 acres comprising 113,258 acres of patented mining claims and other fee lands, and 4,804 acres of unpatented mining claims (including 22,907 acres overlaying federal and state minerals on previously counted fee lands).
 
Chino receives power from the Luna Energy Facility and from the open market. It also has the ability to self-generate power. We believe Chino has sufficient water resources to support mining operations as currently planned.
 
Tyrone. Tyrone is an open-pit copper mining complex located in southwestern New Mexico in Grant County, approximately 10 miles south of Silver City, New Mexico, along State Highway 90. The site is accessible by paved road. The open-pit mine has been in operation since 1967. The Tyrone mine is a porphyry copper deposit. Mineralization is predominantly leachable secondary sulfide consisting of chalcocite.
 
Copper processing facilities consist of an SX/EW operation with a maximum capacity of 168 million pounds of copper cathodes per year. Annual copper production over the next three years is expected to range from 80 to 115 million pounds. The current mining fleet has the capacity to move an average of 120,000 metric tons of material per day using a fleet of 15 190-metric ton haul trucks loaded by five shovels with bucket sizes ranging from 22 to 54 cubic meters. Historically, ore production has occurred from numerous open pits throughout the site. Mining is currently ongoing in a single, large, central open pit.
 
Tyrone is located in a desert environment with rainfall averaging 16 inches per year. The highest bench elevation is 2,000 meters above sea level, and the ultimate pit bottom is expected to have an elevation of 1,500 meters above sea level. The Tyrone operation encompasses approximately 35,200 acres comprising 18,755 acres of patented mining claims and other fee lands, and 16,445 acres of unpatented mining claims (includes 1,116 acres overlaying federal minerals on previously counted fee lands).
 
Tyrone receives electrical power from the Luna Energy Facility and from the open market. Tyrone also has the ability to self-generate power. We believe the Tyrone operation has sufficient water resources to support mining operations as currently planned.

Henderson and Climax
 
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Henderson. The Henderson molybdenum mine is located approximately 42 miles west of Denver, Colorado, off U.S. Highway 40. Nearby communities include the towns of Empire, Georgetown and Idaho Springs. The Henderson mill site is located approximately 15 miles west of the mine, and is accessible from Colorado State Highway 9. The Henderson mine and mill are connected by a 10-mile conveyor tunnel under the Continental Divide and an additional five-mile surface conveyor. The tunnel portal is located five miles east of the mill. The mine has been in operation since 1976. The Henderson mine is a porphyry molybdenum deposit with molybdenite as the primary sulfide mineral.
 
The Henderson operation consists of a large block-cave underground mining complex feeding a 36,000 metric ton-per-day concentrator. Henderson has the capacity to produce approximately 40 million pounds of molybdenum per year with production expected to be at or near capacity over the next three years. The underground mining equipment fleet consists of 17 nine-metric ton load-haul-dumps, and seven 36- and 73-metric ton haul trucks, which feed a gyratory crusher feeding a series of three overland conveyors to the mill stockpiles. Mining is currently from two production levels. The majority of the molybdenum concentrate produced is shipped to our Fort Madison, Iowa, processing facility.
 
The Henderson mine is located in a mountain region with the main access shaft at 3,180 meters above sea level. The main production levels are currently at elevations of 2,350 and 2,000 meters above sea level. This region experiences significant snowfall during the winter months.
 
The Henderson mine and mill operations encompass approximately 11,878 acres comprising 11,843 acres of patented mining claims and other fee lands, and a 35-acre easement with the U.S. Forest Service for the surface portion of the conveyor corridor.
 
Henderson operations receive electrical power through long-term contracts with Xcel Energy and natural gas through long-term contracts with BP Energy with Xcel Energy as the transporter. We believe Henderson has sufficient water resources at the mine and mill for any planned production scenarios.
 
Climax.  The Climax molybdenum mine is located 13 miles northeast of Leadville, Colorado, off Colorado State Highway 91 at the top of Freemont Pass. The mine is accessible by paved roads. The Climax mine is a porphyry molybdenum deposit with molybdenite as the primary sulfide mineral.
 
The Climax mine was placed on care-and-maintenance status in 1995. In December 2007, we announced plans to restart the Climax mine. This $500 million project involves construction of new milling facilities and the restart of open-pit mining. Refer to “Development and Exploration” for further discussion.
 
The Climax mine is located in a mountain region. The highest bench elevation is approximately 4,050 meters above sea level, and the ultimate pit bottom is expected to be approximately 3,100 meters above sea level. This region experiences significant snowfall during the winter months. The Climax operation encompasses approximately 14,339 acres of patented mining claims and other fee lands.
 
Climax’s electrical power is supplied by Xcel Energy. We expect that once the operations are restarted, Xcel Energy will be able to supply sufficient energy to the Climax mine. Although we believe the Climax operation has sufficient water resources to support mining operations as currently planned, we are a party to litigation that could adversely affect our water rights at Climax. (Refer to Item 3, Legal Proceedings, for information concerning the status of these proceedings.)

Other North American Operations

Rod and Refining operations. Our rod and refining operations consist of conversion facilities including a refinery in El Paso, Texas, rod mills in El Paso, Texas; Norwich, Connecticut; Miami, Arizona and Chicago, Illinois, and a specialty copper products facility in Bayway, New Jersey.  We refine our anode copper production from our smelter in Miami, Arizona, along with purchased anodes at our El Paso refinery. The El Paso refinery has an annual production capacity of about 900 million pounds of copper cathode, which is sufficient to refine all the anode copper we produce at Miami. Our El Paso refinery also produces nickel carbonate, copper telluride, and autoclaved slimes material containing gold, silver, platinum and palladium.

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We are the world’s largest producer of continuous-cast copper rod, which is the basic feed for the electrical wire and cable industry. Most of our refined copper and additional purchased copper cathode is converted into rod at our four continuous-cast copper rod mills, which have a collective annual capacity to convert more than two billion pounds of refined copper into rod and other refined copper products.
 
Molybdenum Conversion facilities.  We process molybdenum concentrates at our conversion plants in the United States and Europe into such products as technical-grade molybdic oxide, ferromolybdenum, pure molybdic oxide, ammonium molybdates, molybdenum metal powders and molybdenum disulfide. We operate molybdenum roasters at Green Valley, Arizona; Fort Madison, Iowa; and Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
 
The Green Valley, Arizona facility, which is located at our Sierrita mine, consists of two molybdenum roasters that process molybdenum concentrates produced at our mines and on a toll basis for third parties. The facility produces molybdenum oxide and related products.
 
The Fort Madison, Iowa, facility consists of two molybdenum roasters, a sulfuric acid plant, a metallurgical (technical oxide) packaging facility, and a chemical conversion plant, which includes a wet-chemicals plant and sublimation equipment. In the chemical plant, molybdic oxide is further refined into various high-purity molybdenum chemicals for a wide range of uses by chemical and catalyst manufacturers. In addition to metallurgical oxide products, the Fort Madison facility produces ammonium dimolybdate, pure molybdic oxide, ammonium heptamolybdate, ammonium octamolybdate, sodium molybdate, sublimed pure molybdic oxide and molybdenum disulfide.
 
The Rotterdam conversion plant consists of a molybdenum roaster, sulfuric acid plant, metallurgical packaging facility and chemical conversion plant. The plant produces metallurgical products primarily for third parties. Ammonium dimolybdate and pure molybdic oxide are produced in the wet-chemicals plant.
 
We also produce ferromolybdenum and molybdenum disulfide for worldwide customers at our conversion plant located in Stowmarket, United Kingdom. The plant is operated both as an internal and external customer tolling facility.

Process Technology Centers.  We have a process technology center located in Safford, Arizona. The objective of the center is to develop technologies that will enhance our competitive position in the world copper market. The center provides metallurgical process development capabilities, process optimization services, metallurgical testing and advanced material characterization services to meet the needs of our operations. Activities are focused on the development of new cost-competitive, “step change” technologies and the continuous improvement of existing processes, with an emphasis on the effective implementation, transfer and sharing of technology within our operations and projects. The center employs approximately 125 engineers, scientists and technical support staff. The facilities include:

·  
a large-diameter, column-leach facility for testing run-of-mine material, which is capable of processing up to approximately 550 metric tons of ore annually;
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a continuous SX/EW test facility capable of producing approximately 3,000 pounds of copper cathode per day;
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a small-diameter, column-leach facility with a capacity of about 250 individual tests per year for crushed material;
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a metallurgical laboratory for the development of biological leaching processes and enhancements, and other biological applications;
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a demonstration facility for production of new copper products; and
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a state-of-the-art material characterization laboratory with advanced mineralogy, analytical chemistry and metallography capabilities.

The principal areas of activity include hydrometallurgy (leaching and SX/EW), mineral processing (crushing, grinding and flotation), material characterization, environmental technology, new copper products and technical information services.

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We also have a molybdenum technology center located in Sahuarita, Arizona, focused on new product development and product applications as an extension of our metals business. In addition, our Climax technology center produces molybdenum metal powders.

SOUTH AMERICA

We have four operating copper mines in South America – Cerro Verde in Peru, and Candelaria, Ojos del Salado and El Abra in Chile. These operations include open-pit and underground mining, sulfide ore concentrating, leaching and SX/EW.
 
Following are maps and descriptions for our South American Mining operations:

Cerro Verde
 
Cerro Verde is an open-pit copper and molybdenum mining complex located 20 miles southwest of Arequipa, Peru. The site is accessible by paved highway. We have a 53.56 percent interest in Cerro Verde. The remaining 46.44 percent is held by SMM Cerro Verde Netherlands B.V. (21.0 percent), Compañia de Minas Buenaventura S.A.A. (18.5 percent) and other shareholders whose shares are publicly traded on the Lima Stock Exchange (6.94 percent). The Cerro Verde mine has been in operation since 1976.
 
The Cerro Verde mine is a porphyry copper deposit that has leachable oxide and secondary sulfide mineralization, and millable primary sulfide mineralization. The predominant oxide copper minerals are brochantite, chrysocolla, malachite and copper “pitch.” Chalcocite and covellite are the most important secondary copper sulfide minerals. Chalcopyrite and molybdenite are the dominant primary sulfides.
 
Cerro Verde’s current operation consists of an open-pit copper mine and SX/EW leaching facilities. Leach-copper production is derived from a 39,000 metric ton-per-day crushed leach facility and a ROM leach system. This leaching operation has a capacity of approximately 200 million pounds of copper per year. A new 108,000 metric ton-per-day concentrator was completed in late 2006, and processing of sulfide ore began in the fourth quarter of 2006. Annual production over the next three years is expected to range from 655 to 705 million pounds of copper (350 to 375 million pounds for our share) and seven to nine million pounds of molybdenum (four to five million pounds for our share).
 
Cerro Verde has sufficient equipment to move an average of 295,000 metric tons of material per day using a fleet of 26 180-metric ton and 230-metric ton haul trucks loaded by six shovels with bucket sizes ranging in size from 21 to 46 cubic meters.
 
Copper cathodes and concentrate production are transported approximately 70 miles by truck and rail to the Pacific Port of Matarani for shipment to international markets.
 
Cerro Verde is located in a desert environment with rainfall averaging 1.5 inches per year and is in an active seismic zone. The highest bench elevation is 2,900 meters above sea level, and the ultimate pit bottom is expected to be 2,000 meters above sea level. Cerro Verde has a mining concession covering
 
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approximately 53,094 acres plus 15 acres of owned property and 22 acres of rights-of-way outside the mining concession area.
 
Cerro Verde receives electrical power under long-term contracts with Electroperu and Empresa de Generación Eléctrica de Arequipa. The existing freshwater intake and supply system on the Rio Chili was expanded for the Cerro Verde concentrator project. Cerro Verde’s participation in the Pillones Reservoir Project has secured water rights that we believe will be sufficient to support Cerro Verde’s operations as currently planned.

Candelaria and Ojos del Salado
 
Candelaria.  Candelaria is an open-pit and underground copper mining complex located approximately 12 miles south of Copiapó in northern Chile’s Atacama province, Region III. The site is accessible by two maintained dirt roads, one coming through the Tierra Amarilla community and the other off of Route 5 of the International Pan-American Highway. We have an 80 percent interest in Candelaria. The remaining 20 percent interest is owned by affiliates of the Sumitomo Corporation. The open-pit copper mine has been in operation since 1993 and the underground copper mine since 2005.
 
The Candelaria mine is an iron oxide, copper/gold deposit. Millable primary sulfide mineralization consists of chalcopyrite.
 
The Candelaria operation consists of an open-pit copper mine and a 4,000 metric ton-per-day underground copper mine, which is mined by sublevel stoping, feeding a 67,000 metric ton-per-day concentrator. On average, open-pit mining operations move 290,000 metric tons of material per day using a fleet of 50 225-metric ton haul trucks loaded by nine shovels with bucket sizes ranging from 13 to 43 cubic meters. Copper concentrates are transported by truck to the Punta Padrones port facility located in Caldera, approximately 50 miles northwest of the mine. Annual copper production is expected to range from 300 to 360 million pounds (240 to 285 million pounds for our share) over the next three years.
 
Candelaria is located in a desert environment with rainfall averaging less than one inch per year and is in an active seismic zone. The highest bench elevation is 675 meters above sea level, and the ultimate pit bottom is expected to be 30 meters below sea level. The Candelaria property encompasses approximately 13,390 acres, including approximately 544 acres for the port facility in Caldera. The remaining property consists of mineral rights owned by us in which the surface is not owned but is controlled by us consistent with Chilean law.
 
Candelaria receives electrical power through long-term contracts with Empresa Eléctrica Guacolda S.A., a local energy company. Candelaria’s water supply comes from well fields in the area of Tierra Amarilla and Copiapó that draw water from the Copiapó River aquifer. Because of rapid depletion of that aquifer in recent years, ongoing studies are addressing the adequacy of this water supply for mining operations as planned.
 
 
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Ojos del Salado.  Ojos del Salado consists of two underground copper mines (Santos and Alcaparrosa) and a 4,000 metric ton-per-day concentrator. The operation is located approximately 10 miles east of Copiapó in northern Chile’s Atacama province, Region III, and is accessible by paved highway. We have an 80 percent interest in Ojos del Salado. The remaining 20 percent interest is owned by affiliates of the Sumitomo Corporation. The Ojos del Salado operation began commercial production in 1929.
 
The Ojos del Salado mines are iron oxide and copper/gold deposits. Millable primary sulfide mineralization consists of chalcopyrite.
 
The Ojos del Salado operation has a capacity of 3,800 metric tons per day of ore from the Santos underground mine and 4,000 metric tons per day from the Alcaparrosa underground mine. The ore from both mines is mined by sublevel stoping, which is a variation of blasthole stoping, because both the ore and enclosing rocks are competent. The broken ore is removed from the stopes using front-end loaders and loaded into 18 28-metric ton trucks, which transport the ore to the surface. The ore from the Santos mine is hauled directly to the Ojos del Salado mill for processing, and the ore from the Alcaparrosa mine is reloaded into five 54-metric ton trucks and hauled 12 miles to the Candelaria mill for processing. The Ojos del Salado concentrator has the capacity to produce over 60 million pounds of copper and 19,000 ounces of gold per year. Annual copper production over the next three years is expected to range from 30 to 60 million pounds (24 to 48 million pounds for our share), and annual gold production is expected to range from 6,000 to 19,000 ounces (4,800 to 15,200 ounces for our share) over the next four years. Tailings from the Ojos del Salado mill are pumped to the Candelaria tailings facility for final deposition. The Candelaria facility has sufficient capacity for the remaining Ojos del Salado tailings in addition to Candelaria’s tailings.
 
Ojos del Salado is located in a desert environment with rainfall averaging less than one inch per year and is in an active seismic zone.  The highest underground level is at an elevation of 500 meters above sea level, with the lowest underground level at 150 meters above sea level. The Ojos del Salado mineral rights encompass approximately 15,815 acres, which includes approximately 6,784 acres of owned land in and around the Ojos del Salado underground mines and plant site.
 
Ojos del Salado receives electrical power through long-term contracts with Empresa Eléctrica Guacolda S.A. Ojos del Salado’s water supply draws water from the Copiapo River aquifer.  Because of rapid depletion of this aquifer in recent years, ongoing studies are addressing the adequacy of this water supply for the mining operation as planned.

El Abra
 
El Abra is an open-pit copper mining complex located 47 miles north of Calama in Chile’s El Loa province, Region II. The site is accessible by paved highway and by rail. We have a 51 percent interest in El Abra. The remaining 49 percent interest is held by the state-owned copper enterprise Corporación Nacional del Cobre de Chile (CODELCO). The mine has been in operation since 1996.
 
The El Abra mine is a porphyry copper deposit that has leachable oxide and sulfide mineralization. The predominant oxide copper minerals are chrysocolla and pseudomalachite. There are lesser amounts of
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copper-bearing clays and tenorite. The predominant primary sulfide copper minerals are bornite and chalcopyrite. The secondary sulfide mineralization is chalcocite. The El Abra operation consists of an open-pit copper mine and an SX/EW facility with a capacity of 500 million pounds of copper cathode per year from a 120,000 metric ton-per-day crushed leach circuit and a similar-sized, ROM leaching operation. Annual copper production is expected to range from 335 pounds to 370 million pounds over the next three years (170 million to 190 million pounds for our share). The mining operation has sufficient equipment to move an average of 223,000 metric tons per day using a fleet of 26 220-metric ton haul trucks loaded by six shovels with buckets ranging in size from 26 to 41 cubic meters. At the end of 2006, we completed a feasibility study to evaluate the development of the large sulfide deposit at El Abra.  This project would extend the mine life by over ten years and is expected to provide an additional 325 million pounds of copper per year compared to the current oxide operation. Copper production from the sulfides is expected to begin in 2010.  Refer to “Development and Exploration” for further discussion.
 
El Abra is located in a desert environment with rainfall averaging less than one inch per year and is in an active seismic zone. The highest bench elevation is 4,180 meters above sea level, and the ultimate pit bottom is expected to be 3,410 meters above sea level. El Abra controls a total of 110,268 acres of mining claims covering the ore deposit, stockpiles, process plant, and water wellfield and pipeline. In addition, El Abra has acquired land surface rights for the plant to mine access road, the wellfield, power transmission line, and for the water pipeline from the Salar de Ascotán. Acquisition of additional land surface area required for the future development of the sulfide project is in process.
 
El Abra currently receives electrical power under a contract with Electroandina, which will expire at the end of 2017. We believe the El Abra operation has sufficient water rights to support operations as currently planned.
 
INDONESIA
 
PT Freeport Indonesia is a limited liability company organized under the laws of the Republic of Indonesia and incorporated in Delaware. We directly own 81.28 percent of PT Freeport Indonesia, 9.36 percent indirectly through our subsidiary, PT Indocopper Investama, and the Government of Indonesia owns the remaining 9.36 percent. PT Freeport Indonesia mines, processes and explores for ore containing copper, gold and silver. It operates in the remote highlands of the Sudirman Mountain Range in the province of Papua, Indonesia, which is on the western half of the island of New Guinea. PT Freeport Indonesia markets its concentrates containing copper, gold and silver worldwide.
 
PT Freeport Indonesia operates under an agreement, the Contract of Work, with the Government of Indonesia. The Contract of Work allows us to conduct exploration, mining and production activities in a 24,700-acre area, referred to as Block A, located in Papua. Under the Contract of Work, PT Freeport Indonesia also conducts exploration activities (which had been suspended, but resumed in 2007) in an approximate 500,000-acre area, referred to as Block B, in Papua. All of PT Freeport Indonesia’s proven and probable mineral reserves and current mining operations are located in Block A.
 
In July 2004, we received a request from the Indonesian Department of Energy and Mineral Resources that we offer to sell shares in PT Indocopper Investama to Indonesian nationals at fair market value. In response to this request and in view of the potential benefits of having additional Indonesian ownership in our operations, we agreed at that time to consider a potential sale of an interest in PT Indocopper Investama at fair market value. Neither our Contract of Work nor Indonesian law requires us to divest any portion of our ownership interest in PT Freeport Indonesia or PT Indocopper Investama.
 
In 1996, we established joint ventures with Rio Tinto plc (Rio Tinto), an international mining company with headquarters in London, England. One joint venture covers PT Freeport Indonesia’s mining operations in Block A and gives Rio Tinto, through 2021, a 40 percent interest in certain assets and future production exceeding specified annual amounts of copper, gold and silver in Block A, and, after 2021, a 40 percent interest in all production from Block A. Operating, nonexpansion capital and administrative costs are shared proportionately between PT Freeport Indonesia and Rio Tinto based on the ratio of (a) the incremental revenues from production from our expansion completed in 1998 to (b) total revenues from
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Block A, including production from PT Freeport Indonesia’s previously existing reserves. PT Freeport Indonesia receives 100 percent of the cash flow from specified annual amounts of copper, gold and silver through 2021, calculated by reference to its proven and probable reserves as of December 31, 1994, and 60 percent of all remaining cash flow. PT Freeport Indonesia records its joint venture interest using the proportionate consolidation method.
 
Contracts of Work
 
Through a Contract of Work with the Government of Indonesia, PT Freeport Indonesia conducts its  current exploration and mining operations in Indonesia. The Contract of Work governs our rights and obligations relating to taxes, exchange controls, royalties, repatriation and other matters, and was concluded pursuant to the 1967 Foreign Capital Investment Law, which expresses Indonesia’s foreign investment policy and provides basic guarantees of remittance rights and protection against nationalization, a framework for economic incentives and basic rules regarding other rights and obligations of foreign investors. Specifically, the Contract of Work provides that the Government of Indonesia will not nationalize or expropriate PT Freeport Indonesia’s mining operations. Any disputes regarding the provisions of the Contract of Work are subject to international arbitration. We have experienced no disputes requiring arbitration during the 40 years we have operated in Indonesia.
 
PT Freeport Indonesia’s Contract of Work covers both Block A, which was first included in a 1967 Contract of Work that was replaced by a new Contract of Work in 1991, and Block B, to which we gained rights in 1991. The initial term of our Contract of Work expires in December 2021, but we can extend it for two 10-year periods subject to Indonesian government approval, which cannot be withheld or delayed unreasonably. We originally had the rights to explore 6.5 million acres in Block B, but pursuant to the Contract of Work we have only retained the rights to approximately 500,000 acres following significant geological assessment.
 
PT Irja Eastern Minerals (Eastern Minerals), of which we own 100 percent, has a Contract of Work with the Government of Indonesia containing similar terms to PT Freeport Indonesia’s Contract of Work. Eastern Minerals signed its Contract of Work in August 1994. The Contract of Work originally covered approximately 2.5 million exploration acres.  Eastern Minerals’ Contract of Work provides for a four-to-seven year exploratory term and a 30-year term for mining operations. Subject to Indonesian government approval, which cannot be withheld or delayed unreasonably, we can extend this period for two 10-year periods.  Eastern Minerals’ Contract of Work requires us to relinquish our rights to 25 percent of the original 2.5-million-acre Contract of Work area at the end of each of three specified periods. As of December 31, 2007, we had relinquished approximately 1.3 million acres and we expect to relinquish an additional 0.6 million acres in early 2008. The exploration activities under Eastern Minerals’ Contract of Work also have been suspended in recent years; however, in December 2006, Eastern Minerals received approval from the Government of Indonesia to resume exploration activities in 2007.
 
Under a joint venture agreement through PT Nabire Bakti Mining, we conduct exploration activities in an area covering approximately 500,000 acres in five parcels contiguous to PT Freeport Indonesia’s Block B and one of Eastern Minerals’ blocks.
 
PT Freeport Indonesia pays a copper royalty under its Contact of Work that varies from 1.5 percent of copper net revenue at a copper price of $0.90 or less per pound to 3.5 percent at a copper price of $1.10 or more per pound. The Contract of Work royalty rate for gold and silver sales is 1.0 percent.
 
A large part of the mineral royalties under Government of Indonesia regulations are designated to the provinces from which the minerals are extracted. In connection with our fourth concentrator mill expansion, PT Freeport Indonesia agreed to pay the Government of Indonesia additional royalties (royalties not required by our Contract of Work) to provide further support to the local governments and the people of Papua. PT Freeport Indonesia pays the additional royalties on production exceeding specified annual amounts of copper, gold and silver expected to be generated when its milling facilities operate above 200,000 metric tons of ore per day. The additional royalty for copper equals the Contract of Work royalty rate and for gold and silver equals twice the Contract of Work royalty rates. Therefore, our royalty rate on copper net revenues from production above the agreed levels is double the Contract of Work royalty rate, and our royalty rates on gold and silver sales from production above the agreed levels are triple the Contract of Work royalty rates.
 
 
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PT Freeport Indonesia’s share of the combined royalties, including the additional royalties which became effective January 1, 1999, totaled $133 million in 2007, $126 million in 2006 and $104 million in 2005.
 
Grasberg Minerals District
 
 
We and our predecessors have conducted exploration and mining operations in Block A since 1967 and have been the only operator of these operations. We currently have two mines in operation: the Grasberg open pit and the Deep Ore Zone (DOZ) underground block cave. The DOZ and the Ertsberg Stockwork Zone are adjacent to each other and are being mined together following our recently completed expansion of our underground operations to 50,000 metric tons per day, and the planned expansion to 80,000 metric tons per day.
 
Grasberg open-pit.  We began open-pit mining of the Grasberg ore body in 1990. Open-pit operations are expected to continue until mid-2015 at which time the Grasberg underground mining operations are scheduled to begin. Production is currently at the 3,305- to 4,285-meter elevation level and totaled 57.5 million metric tons of ore in 2007 and 63.7 million metric tons of ore in 2006, which provided 75 percent of our 2007 mill feed and 80 percent of our 2006 mill feed. Our open-pit mining rate, including ore and overburden, totaled 667,600 metric tons per day in 2007 and 677,200 metric tons per day in 2006. Approximate annual production rates are expected to range between 600,000 metric tons per day and 700,000 metric tons per day through 2010 and then decline through 2015.
 
The current Grasberg equipment fleet consists of over 500 units. As of December 31, 2007, the larger mining equipment directly associated with production includes 143 haul trucks with payloads ranging from approximately 215 metric tons to 330 metric tons, 18 shovels with bucket sizes ranging from 30 cubic meters to 42 cubic meters.
 
Grasberg crushing and conveying systems are integral to the mine and provide the capacity to transport up to 225,000 metric tons per day of Grasberg ore to the mill and 135,000 metric tons per day of overburden to the overburden stockpiles. The remaining ore and overburden is moved by haul trucks.
 
Deep Ore Zone. The DOZ ore body lies vertically below the now depleted Intermediate Ore Zone. We began production from the DOZ ore body in 1989 using open stope mining methods, but we suspended production in 1991 in favor of production from the Grasberg deposit. Production resumed in September 2000 using the block-cave method. Production is at the 3,110-meter elevation level and totaled 19.5 million metric tons of ore in 2007 and 16.5 million metric tons of ore in 2006. Production from the DOZ
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averaged 53,500 metric tons of ore per day in 2007 and 45,200 metric tons of ore per day in 2006.
 
During 2007, we completed over 16,300 meters of development drifting in support of the block-cave mining method, and in mid-2007 we completed an expansion of the DOZ underground operation to allow a sustained rate of 50,000 metric tons of ore per day. Further expansion of the DOZ operation to 80,000 metric tons of ore per day is under way with completion targeted by 2010. Our success in developing the DOZ mine, one of the world’s largest underground mines, has given us additional confidence in the future development of our large-scale undeveloped ore bodies.
 
The DOZ mine fleet consists of over 175 pieces of mobile heavy equipment. The primary mining equipment directly associated with production and development includes 51 load-haul-dump (LHD) units and 20 haul trucks. Our production LHD units typically carry approximately 11 metric tons of ore. Using ore passes and chutes, the LHD units transfer ore into 55-ton capacity haul trucks. The trucks dump into two gyratory crushers and ore is then conveyed to the surface stockpiles.
 
Our principal source of power for all our Indonesian operations is a coal-fired power plant that we built in conjunction with our fourth concentrator mill expansion. Diesel generators supply peaking and backup electrical power generating capacity. A combination of naturally occurring mountain streams and water derived from our underground operations provides water for our operations. Our Indonesian operations are in an active seismic zone and experience average annual rainfall of 195 inches.
 
Mining Operations - Mines in Development
 
Development projects.  In addition to the Grasberg open pit and DOZ, four other ore bodies (the underground Grasberg, Kucing Liar, Mill Level Zone/Deep Mill Level Zone and Big Gossan) are located in Block A. These ore bodies are at various stages of development, and are included in our proven and probable recoverable reserves. We continually review our operation’s development opportunities to maximize the value of the reserves. We incurred $270 million ($247 million for our share) for mine development, and supporting infrastructure capital expenditures related primarily to the Grasberg block cave and Big Gossan ore bodies and $40 million ($30 million for our share) for common underground infrastructure development during the three years ended December 31, 2007. See “Risk Factors.”
 
The underground Grasberg reserves will be mined using the block-cave method at the end of open-pit mining, which is expected to continue until approximately mid-2015. The Kucing Liar ore body lies on the southern flank of and underneath the southern portion of the Grasberg open pit at the 2,605- to 3,115-meter elevation level. We expect to mine the Kucing Liar ore body using the block-cave method.
 
Beginning in 2007, we report the Mill Level Zone and Deep Mill Level Zone ore bodies as one ore body because we plan to mine them using some of the same infrastructure. The Mill Level Zone lies directly below the DOZ mine at the 2,890-meter elevation and the Deep Mill Level Zone lies beneath the Mill Level Zone at the 2,590-meter elevation. This ore represents the downward continuation of mineralization in the Ertsberg East Skarn system and neighboring Ertsberg porphyry. Drilling efforts continue to determine the extent of this ore body. We expect to mine the Mill Level Zone using a block-cave method near completion of mining at the DOZ. Near the end of mining the Mill Level Zone, we expect to mine the Deep Mill Level Zone also using a block-cave method.
 
The Big Gossan ore body is located approximately 1,000 meters southwest of the original Ertsberg open-pit deposit. We began the initial underground development of the ore body in 1993 when we drove tunnels from the mill area into the ore zone at the 3,000-meter elevation level. A stope and fill mining method will be used on the Big Gossan deposit. We expect to begin mining the Big Gossan ore body in 2008, with production expected to ramp up to 7,000 metric tons per day in late 2010 (average annual aggregate incremental production of 125 million pounds of copper and 65,000 ounces of gold with PT Freeport Indonesia receiving 60 percent of these amounts).
 
In 2004, PT Freeport Indonesia commenced its “Common Infrastructure” project, which will provide access to its large undeveloped underground ore bodies located in the Grasberg minerals district through a tunnel system located approximately 400 meters deeper than its existing underground tunnel system. In addition to providing access to our underground ore bodies, the tunnel system will enable us to conduct future exploration in prospective areas associated with currently identified ore bodies. The tunnel system
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has reached the Big Gossan terminal and we are proceeding with development of the lower Big Gossan infrastructure. We have also advanced development of the Grasberg spur and as of December 31, 2007, has completed 96 percent of the tunneling required to reach the Grasberg underground ore body. We expect the Grasberg spur to reach the Grasberg underground ore body and to initiate multi-year mine development activities in the second half of 2008.
 
Studies are under way to update the estimated aggregate capital expenditures to reach full production capacity for the undeveloped ore bodies in the Grasberg district. Previous estimates of approximately $3.1 billion for the development of these ore bodies were primarily based on studies completed in 2003. These amounts included $1.2 billion in estimated capital for the Grasberg underground, $0.7 billion for Kucing Liar, $0.2 billion for Big Gossan and $0.6 billion for MLZ/Deep MLZ. Recent estimates for the development of the Grasberg underground ore body, which continue to be reviewed, indicate aggregate capital approximating $3 billion to be incurred between 2008 and 2021. The increase of approximately $1.8 billion primarily reflects higher labor and contractor costs, increased costs for mobile equipment and other input costs. Current cost estimates for Big Gossan approximate $0.5 billion. Our underground operations in Indonesia are more sensitive to changes in labor costs than our open pit and process operations. We will continue to pursue productivity initiatives to mitigate the impact of increased labor costs. Cost estimates for Kucing Liar and MLZ/Deep MLZ, which are not expected to begin development for several years, have not been updated from prior studies.
 
Aggregate capital costs to develop the underground ore bodies are expected to average approximately $275 million per year through 2021.
 
Description of Ore Bodies. Our ore bodies are located within and around two main igneous intrusions, the Grasberg monzodiorite and the Ertsberg diorite. The host rocks of these ore bodies include both carbonate and clastic rocks that form the ridge crests and upper flanks of the Sudirman Range, and the igneous rocks of monzonitic to dioritic composition that intrude them. The igneous-hosted ore bodies (the Grasberg open pit and block cave, and the Ertsberg Stockwork Zone block cave) occur as vein stockworks and disseminations of copper sulphides, dominated by chalcopyrite and, to a much lesser extent, bornite. The sedimentary-rock hosted ore bodies occur as “magnetite-rich, calcium/magnesian skarn” replacements, whose location and orientation are strongly influenced by major faults and by the chemistry of the carbonate rocks along the margins of the intrusions.
 
The copper mineralization in these skarn deposits is also dominated by chalcopyrite, but higher bornite concentrations are common. Moreover, gold occurs in significant concentrations in all of the district’s ore bodies, though rarely visible to the naked eye. These gold concentrations usually occur as inclusions within the copper sulphide minerals, though, in some deposits, these concentrations can also be strongly associated with pyrite.
 
The following diagram indicates the relative elevations (in meters) of our reported ore bodies.
 
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The following map, which encompasses an area of approximately 42 square kilometers (approximately 16 square miles), indicates the relative positions and sizes of our reported ore bodies and their locations.
 
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AFRICA

We are developing our initial project at Tenke Fungurume in the DRC. Following is a map and description of our African operations:

Tenke Fungurume
 
The Tenke Fungurume deposits are located in the Katanga province of the DRC approximately 110 miles northwest of Lubumbashi. The deposits are accessible by unpaved roads and by rail. We have an effective 57.75 percent interest in the concessions, and are the operator of the project. The remaining ownership interests are held by Tenke Mining Corp.(TMC), which is owned by Lundin Mining Corporation (24.75 percent) and La Generale des Carrieres et des Mines, which is wholly owned by the Government
 
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of the DRC (17.5 percent). We are responsible for funding 70 percent of project development costs and, at our joint venture partner’s election, we are also responsible for financing our partner’s share of project overruns of more than 25 percent of the feasibility study cost estimates.
 
In February 2008, we received a letter from the Ministry of Mines, Government of the Democratic Republic of Congo, seeking our comment on proposed material modifications to our mining contract for the Tenke Fungurume concession, including the amount of transfer payments payable to the government, the government’s percentage ownership and involvement in the management of the mine, regularization of certain matters under Congolese law and the implementation of social plans. Our mining contract was negotiated transparently and approved by the Government of the DRC following extended negotiations, and we believe it complies with Congolese law and is enforceable without modifications. We are currently working cooperatively with the Ministry of Mines to resolve these matters while continuing with our project development activities.
 
The Tenke Fungurume deposits are sediment-hosted copper/cobalt deposits with leachable oxide, mixed oxide-sulfide and sulfide mineralization. The dominant oxide minerals are malachite, pseudomalachite and heterogenite. Important sulfide minerals consist of bornite, carrollite, chalcocite and chalcopyrite.
 
Copper and cobalt will be recovered through an agitation-leach plant capable of processing 8,000 metric tons of ore per day. Operations are expected to begin in 2009 with average annual production of approximately 250 million pounds of copper (approximately 144 million pounds for our share) and 18 million pounds of cobalt (approximately 10 million pounds for our share). The current fleet includes 28 five-cubic meter front-end loaders, 28 45-metric ton haul trucks, surface miners, production drills, sampling machines and crawler dozers.
 
Tenke Fungurume is located in a tropical region; however, temperatures are moderated by its higher altitudes. Weather in this region is characterized by a dry season and a wet season, each lasting about six months, and average rainfall is 47 inches per year. The highest bench elevation is expected to be 1,480 meters above sea level, and the ultimate pit bottom is expected to be 1,270 meters above sea level. The Tenke Fungurume deposits are located within four concessions totaling 394,455 acres of mining claims.
 
Tenke Fungurume has entered into long-term power supply and infrastructure funding agreements with La Societe Nationale d’Electricite (SNEL), the state-owned electric utility company serving the region. The results of a recent water exploration program, as well as the regional geological and hydro-geological conditions, indicate that adequate water will be available for the expected life of the operation.
 
ATLANTIC COPPER AND PT SMELTING
 
Atlantic Copper, S.A. We own 100 percent of Atlantic Copper, a copper smelter located in Huelva, Spain. Atlantic Copper completed the last expansion of its production capacity in 1997 and the design capacity of its smelter is 290,000 metric tons of copper per year and its refinery currently has a nominal capacity of 260,000 metric tons of copper per year. We have no present plans to expand Atlantic Copper’s production capacity.
 
During 2007, Atlantic Copper treated 952,300 metric tons of concentrate and scrap and produced 256,100 metric tons of new copper anodes and 243,600 metric tons of copper cathodes. During 2006, Atlantic Copper treated 953,700 metric tons of concentrate and scrap and produced 263,700 metric tons of new copper anodes and 235,400 metric tons of copper cathodes. In June 2007, Atlantic Copper completed a scheduled 23-day maintenance turnaround. Major maintenance turnarounds typically occur approximately every 12 years for Atlantic Copper, with significantly shorter term maintenance turnarounds occurring in the interim. The next scheduled maintenance activity at Atlantic Copper is in 2011.
 
Atlantic Copper purchased approximately 43 percent of its 2007 concentrate requirements from PT Freeport Indonesia at market prices. Atlantic Copper has experienced no significant operating problems, and we are not aware of any potential material environmental liabilities at Atlantic Copper.
 
We made no capital contributions to Atlantic Copper from 2005 through 2007; however, we contributed
 
21

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$202 million to Atlantic Copper in 2004. In addition, we loaned $190 million to Atlantic Copper in 2004. The funds were used to improve Atlantic Copper’s financial structure during its 2004 major maintenance turnaround and during a period of extremely low treatment and refining charge rates. Our net investment in Atlantic Copper through December 31, 2007, was approximately $139 million.
 
PT Smelting. PT Freeport Indonesia’s Contract of Work required us to construct or cause to be constructed a smelter in Indonesia if we and the Indonesian government determined that such a project would be economically viable. In 1995, following the completion of a feasibility study, we entered into agreements relating to the formation of PT Smelting and the construction of the copper smelter in Gresik, Indonesia.
 
PT Smelting is a joint venture among PT Freeport Indonesia, Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, Mitsubishi Corporation and Nippon Mining & Metals Co., Ltd., which own 25 percent, 60.5 percent, 9.5 percent and 5 percent, respectively, of the outstanding PT Smelting common stock. In accordance with the joint venture agreements, PT Freeport Indonesia provides the majority of PT Smelting’s copper concentrate requirements. In December 2003, PT Smelting’s shareholder agreement was amended to eliminate PT Freeport Indonesia’s assignment of its earnings in PT Smelting to support a 13 percent cumulative annual return to the other owners for the first 20 years of operations. PT Freeport Indonesia’s total investment in PT Smelting through December 31, 2007, was $101 million.
 
During 2007, PT Smelting treated 976,300 metric tons of concentrate and produced 277,100 metric tons of new copper anodes and 256,900 metric tons of copper cathodes. During 2006, PT Smelting treated 737,500 metric tons of concentrate and produced 201,200 metric tons of new copper anodes and 217,600 metric tons of copper cathodes. Higher volumes in 2007, compared to 2006, primarily reflect a 22-day maintenance turnaround in the second quarter of 2006 and PT Smelting’s temporary suspension of operations beginning in October 2006 and ending in mid-December 2006 following an equipment failure at the oxygen plant supplying the smelter. Major maintenance turnarounds typically occur approximately every four years for PT Smelting, with significantly shorter term maintenance turnarounds in the interim. We have a 25-day maintenance turnaround scheduled for May 2008. PT Smelting’s production capacity is approximately 275,000 metric tons. We are not aware of any potential material environmental liabilities at PT Smelting.

 
22

 
Table of Contents
PRODUCTION DATA


COPPER, Pro Forma
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
(millions of recoverable pounds)
 
2007a
 
2006a
 
2005a
 
2004a
 
2003a
 
                               
MINED COPPER (FCX’s net interest in %)
                             
North America
                             
Morenci (85%)
 
687
b
 
693
b
 
680
b
 
715
b
 
715
b
Bagdad (100%)
 
202
   
165
   
201
   
220
   
214
 
Sierrita (100%)
 
150
   
162
   
158
   
155
   
151
 
Chino (100%)
 
190
   
186
   
210
   
183
   
55
 
Tyrone (100%)
 
50
   
64
   
81
   
86
   
114
 
Miami (100%)
 
20
   
19
   
25
   
20
   
36
 
Tohono (100%)
 
3
   
5
   
5
   
-
   
-
 
Safford (100%)
 
1
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
 
Other (100%)
 
17
   
11
   
5
   
5
   
11
 
Total North America
 
1,320
c
 
1,305
   
1,365
   
1,384
   
1,296
 
                               
South America
                             
Cerro Verde (53.56%)
 
594
   
222
   
206
   
195
   
193
 
Candelaria (80%)
 
399
   
374
   
359
   
441
   
469
 
Ojos del Salado (80%)
 
54
   
55
   
62
   
20
   
-
 
El Abra (51%)
 
366
   
482
   
464
   
481
   
499
 
Total South America
 
1,413
c
 
1,133
   
1,091
   
1,137
   
1,161
 
                               
Indonesia
                             
Grasberg (90.64%)
 
1,151
d
 
1,201
d
 
1,456
d
 
997
d
 
1,292
d
Consolidated basis
 
3,884
   
3,639
   
3,912
   
3,518
   
3,749
 
                               
Less minority participants’ share
 
653
   
537
   
543
   
512
   
550
 
Net equity interest
 
3,231
   
3,102
   
3,369
   
3,006
   
3,199
 
                               
                               
GOLD, Pro Forma
                             
(thousands of recoverable ounces)
                             
                               
MINED GOLD (FCX’s net interest in %)
                             
                               
North America (100%)
 
15
b
 
19
b
 
17
   
13
   
2
 
South America (80%)
 
116
e 
 
112
   
117
   
122
   
127
 
Indonesia (90.64%)
 
2,198
d
 
1,732
d
 
2,789
d
 
1,456
d
 
2,463
d
Consolidated basis
 
2,329
   
1,863
   
2,923
   
1,591
   
2,592
 
                               
Less minority participants’ shares
 
229
   
184
   
284
   
160
   
256
 
Net equity interest
 
2,100
   
1,679
   
2,639
   
1,431
   
2,336
 
                               
                               
MOLYBDENUM, Pro Forma
                             
(millions of recoverable pounds)
                             
                               
MINED MOLYBDENUM (FCX’s net interest in %)
                             
                               
Henderson (100%)
 
39
f
 
37
   
32
   
28
   
22
 
By-product – North America (100%)
 
30
b
 
31
b
 
30
   
29
   
30
 
By-product – Cerro Verde (53.56%)
 
1
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
 
Consolidated basis
 
70
 
 
68
   
62
   
57
   
52
 
                               
 
a.
Includes Phelps Dodge’s pre-acquisition results for comparative purposes only.
b. 
Amounts are net of Morenci’s 15 percent joint venture partner interest.
c. 
Includes North American copper production of 258 million pounds and South American copper production of 259 million pounds for Phelps Dodge's pre-acquisition results.
d.
Amounts are net of Grasberg’s joint venture partner’s interest, which varies in accordance with terms of the joint venture agreement.
e.
Includes gold production of 21 thousand ounces for Phelps Dodge's pre-acquisition results.
f.
Includes molybdenum production of 14 million pounds for Phelps Dodge's pre-acquistion results.

 
 
23

 
Table of Contents

SALES DATA

   
Years Ended December 31,
 
COPPER, Pro Forma (millions of recoverable pounds)
 
2007a
 
2006a
 
2005a
 
2004a
 
2003a
 
                               
MINED COPPER (FCX’s net interest in %)
                             
North America
                             
Morenci (85%)
 
693
b
 
692
b
 
680
b
 
715
b
 
716
b
Bagdad (100%)
 
200
   
165
   
209
   
224
   
222
 
Sierrita (100%)
 
157
   
161
   
165
   
158
   
159
 
Chino (100%)
 
186
   
186
   
209
   
183
   
52
 
Tyrone (100%)
 
53
   
64
   
81
   
86
   
114
 
Miami (100%)
 
24
   
19
   
29
   
22
   
40
 
Tohono (100%)
 
3
   
5
   
5
   
-
   
-
 
Safford (100%)
 
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
 
Other (100%)
 
16
   
11
   
5
   
5
   
13
 
Total North America
 
1,332
c
 
1,303
   
1,383
   
1,393
   
1,316
 
                               
South America
                             
Cerro Verde (53.56%)
 
587
   
214
   
205
   
196
   
191
 
Candelaria (80%)
 
393
   
370
   
359
   
446
   
469
 
Ojos del Salado (80%)
 
54
   
55
   
62
   
21
   
-
 
El Abra (51%)
 
365
   
487
   
467
   
482
   
503
 
Total South America
 
1,399
c
 
1,126
   
1,093
   
1,145
   
1,163
 
                               
Indonesia
                             
Grasberg (90.64%)
 
1,131
d
 
1,201
d
 
1,457
d
 
992
d
 
1,296
d
Consolidated basis
 
3,862
   
3,630
   
3,933
   
3,530
   
3,775
 
                               
Less minority participants’ share
 
647
   
535
   
545
   
513
   
550
 
Net equity interest
 
3,215
   
3,095
   
3,388
   
3,017
   
3,225
 
                               
Consolidated sales from mines
 
3,862
   
3,630
   
3,933
   
3,530
   
3,775
 
Purchased copper
 
650
   
736
   
821
   
866
   
749
 
Total consolidated sales
 
4,512
   
4,366
   
4,754
   
4,396
   
4,524
 
                               
Average realized price per pound
                             
Excluding hedging
 
$3.28
   
$3.06
   
$1.76
   
$1.33
   
$0.82
 
Including hedging
 
$3.23
e
 
$2.79
e
 
$1.67
e
 
$1.33
   
$0.82
 
                               
GOLD, Pro Forma (thousands of recoverable ounces)
                             
                               
MINED GOLD (FCX’s net interest in %)
                             
                               
North America (100%)
 
21
b
 
19
b
 
18
   
12
   
7
 
South America (80%)
 
114
f
 
111
   
117
   
122
   
127
 
Indonesia (90.64%)
 
2,185
d
 
1,736
d
 
2,790
d
 
1,443
d
 
2,470
d
Consolidated
 
2,320
   
1,866
   
2,925
   
1,577
   
2,604
 
                               
Less minority participants’ shares
 
228
   
185
   
285
   
159
   
257
 
Net
 
2,092
   
1,681
   
2,640
   
1,418
   
2,347
 
                               
Consolidated sales from mines
 
2,320
   
1,866
   
2,925
   
1,577
   
2,604
 
Purchased gold
 
6
   
12
   
12
   
20
   
35
 
Total consolidated sales
 
2,326
   
1,878
   
2,937
   
1,597
   
2,639
 
                               
Average realized price per ounce
 
$681.80
   
$566.11
g
 
$453.80
   
$410.85
   
$364.40
 
                               
MOLYBDENUM, Pro Forma (millions of recoverable pounds)
                             
                               
MINED MOYBDENUM - Consolidated basis
 
69
h
 
69
   
60
   
63
   
54
 
                               
Purchased molybdenum
 
9
   
8
   
13
   
13
   
8
 
Total consolidated sales
 
78
   
77
   
73
   
76
   
62
 
                               
Average realized price per pound
 
$25.87
   
$21.87
   
$25.89
   
$12.71
   
$5.78
 
  
 
   
a.  
 Includes Phelps Dodge’s pre-acquisition results for comparative purposes only.
b.  
Amounts are net of Morenci’s joint venture partner’s 15 percent interest.
c.  
Includes North American copper sales of 283 million pounds and South American copper sales of 222 million pounds for Phelps Dodge’s pre-acquisition results.
d.  
Amounts are net of Grasberg’s joint venture partner’s interest, which varies in accordance with terms of the joint venture agreement.
e.  
Includes the impact of hedging losses related to copper price protection programs.
f.  
Includes gold sales of 18 thousand ounces for Phelps Dodge’s pre-acquisition results.
g.  
Amount was approximately $606 per ounce before a loss on redemption of FCX’s Gold-Denominated Preferred Stock, Series II.
h.  
Includes molybdenum sales of 17 million pounds for Phelps Dodge’s pre-acquisition results.
 
24

Table of Contents
Ore Reserves

Recoverable proven and probable reserves shown below have been calculated as of December 31, 2007, in accordance with Industry Guide 7 as required by the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934. Proven and probable reserves may not be comparable to similar information regarding mineral reserves disclosed in accordance with the guidance of other countries. Recoverable proven and probable reserves were determined by the use of mapping, drilling, sampling, assaying and evaluation methods generally applied in the mining industry, as more fully discussed below. The term “reserve,” as used in the reserve data presented here, means that part of a mineral deposit which can be economically and legally extracted or produced at the time of the reserve determination. The term “proven reserves” means reserves for which (1) quantity is computed from dimensions revealed in outcrops, trenches, workings or drill holes; (2) grade and/or quality are computed from the result of detailed sampling; and (3) the sites for inspection, sampling and measurements are spaced so closely and the geologic character is sufficiently defined that size, shape, depth and mineral content of reserves are well established. The term “probable reserves” means reserves for which quantity and grade are computed from information similar to that used for proven reserves but the sites for sampling are farther apart or are otherwise less adequately spaced. The degree of assurance, although lower than that for proven reserves, is high enough to assume continuity between points of observation.
 
Our reserve estimates are based on the latest available geological and geotechnical studies. We conduct ongoing studies of our ore bodies to optimize economic values and to manage risk. We revise our mine plans and estimates of recoverable proven and probable mineral reserves as required in accordance with the latest available studies. Estimated recoverable proven and probable reserves were assessed using long-term average prices of $1.20 per pound for copper, $450 per ounce for gold, $6.50 per pound for molybdenum, $7.50 per ounce for silver and $12.00 per pound for cobalt, along with near-term price forecasts reflective of the current price environment. The London spot metal prices for the past three years averaged $2.65 per pound for copper and $582 per ounce for gold, and the Metals Week Molybdenum Dealer Oxide price averaged $28.90 per pound for molybdenum.

   
Recoverable Proven and Probable Reserves at December 31, 2007
 
   
Copper
 
Gold
 
Molybdenum
 
Silver
 
Cobalt
 
   
(billions of lbs)
 
(millions of ozs)
 
(billions of lbs)
 
(millions of ozs)
 
(billions of lbs)
 
North America
 
25.8
 
 0.2
 
1.8
 
  40.3
 
    -
 
South America
 
26.0
 
 1.4
 
0.2
 
  61.7
 
    -
 
Indonesia
 
37.1
 
                    39.4
 
   -
 
128.9
 
    -
 
Africa
 
  4.3
 
   -
 
   -
 
       -
 
0.6
 
Consolidated basisa
 
93.2
 
                   41.0
 
2.0
 
                   230.9
 
0.6
 
                       
Net equity interestb
 
77.0
 
                   37.0
 
1.9
 
196.1
 
0.3
 

 
a.  
Consolidated basis reserves represent estimated metal quantities after reduction for joint venture partner interests at the Morenci mine in North America and at the Grasberg minerals district in Indonesia.
 
b.  
Net equity interest represents our net ownership interest (i.e., estimated consolidated reserves further reduced for minority interests).
 
 
 
25

 
Table of Contents
 
Recoverable Proven and Probable Reserves
Estimated at December 31, 2007
             
       
Proven Reserves
 
Probable Reserves
           
Average Ore Grade
     
Average Ore Grade
   
Processing
Method
 
Million
metric tons
 
Copper
%
 
Gold
g/t
 
Moly
%
 
Silver
g/t
 
Cobalt
%
 
Million
metric tons
 
Copper
%
 
Gold
g/t
 
Moly
%
 
Silver
g/t
 
Cobalt
%
North America
                                                   
Morenci
 
Mill
 
224
 
0.53
 
-
 
0.022
 
-
 
-
 
11
 
0.55
 
-
 
0.022
 
-
 
-
   
Crushed leach
 
446
 
0.56
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
23
 
0.52
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
2,014
 
0.19
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
100
 
0.18
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
Bagdad
 
Mill
 
548
 
0.35
 
0.004
 
0.022
 
1.14
 
-
 
42
 
0.30
 
0.004
 
0.022
 
1.14
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
220
 
0.12
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
18
 
0.12
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
Chino
 
Mill
 
44
 
0.65
 
0.034
 
0.018
 
0.48
 
-
 
12
 
0.57
 
0.034
 
0.010
 
0.48
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
88
 
0.46
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
20
 
0.37
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
Cobrea
 
ROM leach
 
74
 
0.41
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
3
 
0.33
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
Miami
 
ROM leach
 
86
 
0.40
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
16
 
0.36
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
Safford
 
Crushed leach
 
258
 
0.46
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
187
 
0.31
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
34
 
0.22
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
70
 
0.20
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
Sierrita
 
Mill
 
984
 
0.26
 
0.003
 
0.030
 
1.03
 
-
 
69
 
0.23
 
0.003
 
0.025
 
1.03
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
6
 
0.18
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
3
 
0.18
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
Tyrone
 
ROM leach
 
150
 
0.34
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
41
 
0.24
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
Henderson
 
Mill
 
116
 
-
 
-
 
0.193
 
-
 
-
 
6
 
-
 
-
 
0.187
 
-
 
-
Climaxa
 
Mill
 
63
 
-
 
-
 
0.201
 
-
 
-
 
102
 
-
 
-
 
0.142
 
-
 
-
       
5,355
 
0.29
 
0.001
 
0.015
 
0.31
 
-
 
723
 
0.23
 
0.001
 
0.026
 
0.17
 
-
                                                     
South America
                                                   
Cerro Verde
 
Mill
 
405
 
0.53
 
-
 
0.016
 
2.00
 
-
 
1,051
 
0.41
 
-
 
0.013
 
2.00
 
-
   
Crushed leach
 
122
 
0.54
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
130
 
0.41
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
27
 
0.32
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
30
 
0.26
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
Candelaria
 
Mill
 
339
 
0.59
 
0.132
 
-
 
2.16
 
-
 
21
 
0.64
 
0.146
 
-
 
2.39
 
-
Ojos del Salado
 
Mill
 
4
 
1.25
 
0.286
 
-
 
2.61
 
-
 
3
 
0.99
 
0.286
 
-
 
2.61
 
-
El Abra
 
Crushed leach
 
507
 
0.54
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
149
 
0.51
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
318
 
0.31
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
227
 
0.29
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
       
1,722
 
0.50
 
0.027
 
0.004
 
0.90
 
-
 
1,611
 
0.40
 
0.003
 
0.009
 
1.34
 
-
                                                     
Indonesia
                                                   
Grasberg open pit
 
Mill
 
147
 
1.01
 
1.280
 
-
 
2.54
 
-
 
286
 
0.84
 
0.830
 
-
 
2.11
 
-
DOZ/ESZ
 
Mill
 
107
 
0.70
 
0.701
 
-
 
3.40
 
-
 
177
 
0.62
 
0.711
 
-
 
2.84
 
-
Grasberg block cavea
 
Mill
 
275
 
1.20
 
1.204
 
-
 
3.78
 
-
 
708
 
1.01
 
0.715
 
-
 
3.15
 
-
Kucing Liara
 
Mill
 
167
 
1.20
 
1.090
 
-
 
6.45
 
-
 
401
 
1.17
 
1.038
 
-
 
5.59
 
-
MLZ/DMLZa
 
Mill
 
67
 
1.09
 
0.822
 
-
 
5.17
 
-
 
325
 
1.00
 
0.811
 
-
 
4.91
 
-
Big Gossana
 
Mill
 
9
 
2.48
 
1.140
 
-
 
14.55
 
-
 
44
 
2.27
 
1.092
 
-
 
14.79
 
-
       
772
 
1.10
 
1.090
 
-
 
4.31
 
-
 
1,941
 
1.01
 
0.823
 
-
 
4.03
 
-
                                                     
Africa
                                                   
Tenke Fungurumea
 
Agitation leach
 
56
 
2.11
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
0.357
 
44
 
2.47
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
0.301
                                                     
Total
     
7,905
 
0.43
 
0.113
 
0.011
 
0.83
 
0.003
 
4,319
 
0.67
 
0.371
 
0.008
 
2.34
 
0.003
 
a.  Undeveloped reserves requiring significant capital investment to bring into production.
 
The reserve table above and the tables on pages 27 to 31 and 34 utilize the following abbreviations:
 
·  
g/t – grams per metric ton
 
·  
DOZ/ESZ – Deep Ore Zone/Ertsberg Stockwork Zone. In prior years these ore bodies were shown separately.
 
·  
MLZ/DMLZ – Mill Level Zone/Deep Mill Level Zone. In prior years these ore bodies were shown separately.
 
·  
Moly – Molybdenum
 
·  
ROM – Run of Mine

 
26

 
Table of Contents
Recoverable Proven and Probable Reserves
Estimated at December 31, 2007
                                                 
           
Average Ore Grade
 
Recoveries
   
Processing Method
 
Proven and Probable
Million
Metric tons
 
Copper
%
 
Gold
g/t
 
Moly
%
 
Silver
g/t
 
Cobalt
%
 
Copper
%
 
Gold
%
 
Moly
%
 
Silver
%
 
Cobalt
%
North America
                                               
 Morenci
 
Mill
 
235
 
0.53
 
-
 
0.022
 
-
 
-
 
78.5
 
-
 
29.7
 
-
 
-
   
Crushed leach
 
469
 
0.56
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
76.7
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
2,114
 
0.19
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
41.7
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 Bagdad
 
Mill
 
590
 
0.35
 
0.004
 
0.022
 
1.14
 
-
 
84.8
 
60.0
 
72.3
 
70.0
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
238
 
0.12
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
27.3
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 Chino
 
Mill
 
56
 
0.63
 
0.034
 
0.016
 
0.48
 
-
 
78.2
 
77.9
 
37.0
 
77.9
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
108
 
0.44
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
61.9
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 Cobre
 
ROM leach
 
77
 
0.40
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
66.9
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 Miami
 
ROM leach
 
102
 
0.39
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
60.1
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 Safford
 
Crushed leach
 
445
 
0.40
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
67.6
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
104
 
0.21
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
19.6
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 Sierrita
 
Mill
 
1,053
 
0.26
 
0.003
 
0.030
 
1.03
 
-
 
85.4
 
60.0
 
84.7
 
70.0
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
9
 
0.18
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
49.2
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 Tyrone
 
ROM leach
 
191
 
0.32
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
64.6
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 Henderson
 
Mill
 
122
 
-
 
-
 
0.193
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
86.1
 
-
 
-
 Climax
 
Mill
 
165
 
-
 
-
 
0.165
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
88.6
 
-
 
-
       
6,078
                                       
                                                 
South America
                                               
 Cerro Verde
 
Mill
 
1,456
 
0.44
 
-
 
0.014
 
2.00
 
-
 
85.7
 
-
 
49.1
 
40.9
 
-
   
Crushed leach
 
252
 
0.47
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
79.4
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
57
 
0.29
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
43.2
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 Candelaria
 
Mill
 
360
 
0.59
 
0.133
 
-
 
2.17
 
-
 
91.1
 
79.8
 
-
 
77.1
 
-
 Ojos del Salado
 
Mill
 
7
 
1.14
 
0.286
 
-
 
2.61
 
-
 
90.0
 
68.3
 
-
 
60.1
 
-
 El Abra
 
Crushed leach
 
656
 
0.53
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
60.5
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
   
ROM leach
 
545
 
0.30
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
31.1
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
       
3,333