e10vq
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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20549
FORM 10-Q
     
þ   QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the Quarterly Period Ended July 2, 2006
OR
     
o   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                      to                     .
Commission File Number: 0-20322
STARBUCKS CORPORATION
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)
     
Washington
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  91-1325671
(IRS Employer
Identification No.)
2401 Utah Avenue South, Seattle, Washington 98134
(Address of principal executive offices)
(206) 447-1575
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, including Area Code)
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Yes þ     No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of accelerated filer and large accelerated filer in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer þ     Accelerated filer o     Non-accelerated filer o     
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act):
Yes o     No þ
Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.
     
Title   Shares Outstanding as of August 9, 2006
     
Common Stock, par value $0.001 per share   756,066,639
 
 

 


 

STARBUCKS CORPORATION
FORM 10-Q
For the Quarterly Period Ended July 2, 2006
Table of Contents
                 
            Page  
               
       
 
       
Item 1          
            1  
            2  
            3  
            4  
Item 2       14  
Item 3       26  
Item 4       26  
               
       
 
       
Item 1       27  
Item 2       27  
Item 5       27  
Item 6       27  
Signatures     28  
Index to Exhibits     29  
 EXHIBIT 31.1 CERTIFICATION UNDER SARBANES-OXLEY SECTION 302
 EXHIBIT 31.2 CERTIFICATION UNDER SARBANES-OXLEY SECTION 302
 EXHIBIT 32.1 CERTIFICATION UNDER SARBANES-OXLEY SECTION 906
 EXHIBIT 32.2 CERTIFICATION UNDER SARBANES-OXLEY SECTION 906

 


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PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1. Financial Statements
STARBUCKS CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EARNINGS

(in thousands, except earnings per share)
(unaudited)
                                 
    13 Weeks Ended     39 Weeks Ended  
    July 2,     July 3,     July 2,     July 3,  
    2006     2005     2006     2005  
Net revenues:
                               
Company-operated retail
  $ 1,660,977     $ 1,356,605     $ 4,888,804     $ 3,999,213  
Specialty:
                               
Licensing
    216,267       170,330       637,771       488,835  
Foodservice and other
    86,429       74,864       257,012       222,011  
 
                       
Total specialty
    302,696       245,194       894,783       710,846  
 
                       
Total net revenues
    1,963,673       1,601,799       5,783,587       4,710,059  
 
                               
Cost of sales including occupancy costs
    804,889       649,831       2,343,800       1,926,326  
Store operating expenses
    686,602       546,008       1,974,041       1,599,958  
Other operating expenses
    69,478       48,464       192,274       139,092  
Depreciation and amortization expenses
    98,539       85,363       284,335       251,694  
General and administrative expenses
    115,258       90,637       358,194       256,165  
 
                       
Subtotal operating expenses
    1,774,766       1,420,303       5,152,644       4,173,235  
Income from equity investees
    25,666       18,074       65,371       47,179  
 
                       
Operating income
    214,573       199,570       696,314       584,003  
Interest and other income, net
    5,028       3,235       8,439       12,371  
 
                       
Earnings before income taxes
    219,601       202,805       704,753       596,374  
Income taxes
    74,103       77,292       257,783       225,726  
 
                       
Net earnings
  $ 145,498     $ 125,513     $ 446,970     $ 370,648  
 
                       
 
                               
Net earnings per common share — basic
  $ 0.19     $ 0.16     $ 0.58     $ 0.47  
Net earnings per common share — diluted
  $ 0.18     $ 0.16     $ 0.56     $ 0.45  
Weighted average shares outstanding:
                               
Basic
    769,825       783,632       768,108       795,528  
Diluted
    798,259       808,037       795,285       822,245  
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

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STARBUCKS CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(in thousands, except share data)
                 
    July 2,     October 2,  
    2006     2005  
    (unaudited)          
ASSETS
               
Current assets:
               
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 215,739     $ 173,809  
Short-term investments — available-for-sale securities
    175,851       95,379  
Short-term investments — trading securities
    50,389       37,848  
Accounts receivable, net of allowances of $5,985 and $3,079, respectively
    184,941       190,762  
Inventories
    557,359       546,299  
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
    95,424       94,429  
Deferred income taxes, net
    89,969       70,808  
 
           
Total current assets
    1,369,672       1,209,334  
 
               
Long-term investments — available-for-sale securities
    24,045       60,475  
Equity and other investments
    217,306       201,089  
Property, plant and equipment, net
    2,090,903       1,842,019  
Other assets
    147,648       72,893  
Other intangible assets
    36,821       35,409  
Goodwill
    166,047       92,474  
 
           
 
               
TOTAL ASSETS
  $ 4,052,442     $ 3,513,693  
 
           
 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
               
Current liabilities:
               
Accounts payable
  $ 255,158     $ 220,975  
Accrued compensation and related costs
    293,186       232,354  
Accrued occupancy costs
    51,797       44,496  
Accrued taxes
    70,543       78,293  
Short-term borrowings
    200,000       277,000  
Other accrued expenses
    215,810       198,082  
Deferred revenue
    235,528       175,048  
Current portion of long-term debt
    758       748  
 
           
Total current liabilities
    1,322,780       1,226,996  
 
               
Long-term debt
    2,300       2,870  
Other long-term liabilities
    222,267       193,565  
 
               
Shareholders’ equity:
               
Common stock ($0.001 par value) — authorized, 1,200,000,000; issued and outstanding, 768,376,679 and 767,442,110 shares, respectively (includes 3,394,200 common stock units in both periods)
    768       767  
Additional paid-in-capital
    42,065       90,201  
Other additional paid-in-capital
    39,393       39,393  
Retained earnings
    2,385,957       1,938,987  
Accumulated other comprehensive income
    36,912       20,914  
 
           
Total shareholders’ equity
    2,505,095       2,090,262  
 
           
 
               
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
  $ 4,052,442     $ 3,513,693  
 
           
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

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STARBUCKS CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(in thousands)
(unaudited)
                 
    39 Weeks Ended  
    July 2,     July 3,  
    2006     2005  
OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
               
Net earnings
  $ 446,970     $ 370,648  
Adjustments to reconcile net earnings to net cash provided by operating activities:
               
Depreciation and amortization
    303,210       271,795  
Provision for impairments and asset retirements
    12,017       15,159  
Deferred income taxes, net
    (75,094 )     (37,484 )
Equity in income of investees
    (40,989 )     (27,644 )
Distributions from equity investees
    37,499       24,342  
Stock-based compensation
    78,698        
Tax benefit from exercise of stock options
    908       99,798  
Excess tax benefit from exercise of stock options
    (93,327 )      
Net amortization of premium on securities
    1,643       9,248  
Cash provided/(used) by changes in operating assets and liabilities:
               
Inventories
    (6,672 )     (72,292 )
Accounts payable
    27,549       (16,440 )
Accrued compensation and related costs
    58,535       7,393  
Accrued taxes
    85,308       32,994  
Deferred revenue
    60,085       51,616  
Other operating assets and liabilities
    39,434       30,191  
 
           
Net cash provided by operating activities
    935,774       759,324  
 
               
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
               
Purchase of available-for-sale securities
    (529,764 )     (616,093 )
Maturity of available-for-sale securities
    193,184       449,524  
Sale of available-for-sale securities
    291,878       507,589  
Acquisitions, net of cash acquired
    (90,578 )     (18,976 )
Net (purchases)/sales of equity, other investments and other assets
    (19,938 )     6,676  
Net additions to property, plant and equipment
    (522,348 )     (469,916 )
 
           
Net cash used by investing activities
    (677,566 )     (141,196 )
 
               
FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
               
Proceeds from issuance of common stock
    131,824       145,870  
Excess tax benefit from exercise of stock options
    93,327        
Net repayments of revolving credit facility
    (77,000 )      
Repurchase of common stock
    (367,771 )     (777,657 )
Principal payments on long-term debt
    (560 )     (550 )
 
           
Net cash used by financing activities
    (220,180 )     (632,337 )
 
               
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
    3,902       (732 )
 
           
Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
    41,930       (14,941 )
 
               
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS:
               
Beginning of period
    173,809       145,053  
 
           
 
               
End of the period
  $ 215,739     $ 130,112  
 
           
 
               
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION:
               
Cash paid during the 39 weeks ended:
               
Interest
  $ 4,892     $ 333  
Income taxes
  $ 239,004     $ 129,530  
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

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STARBUCKS CORPORATION
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

For the 13 Weeks and 39 Weeks Ended July 2, 2006, and July 3, 2005
Note 1: Financial Statement Preparation
The unaudited consolidated financial statements as of July 2, 2006, and for the 13-week and 39-week periods ended July 2, 2006, and July 3, 2005, have been prepared by Starbucks Corporation (“Starbucks” or the “Company”) under the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). In the opinion of management, the financial information for the 13-week and 39-week periods ended July 2, 2006, and July 3, 2005, reflects all adjustments and accruals, which are of a normal recurring nature, necessary for a fair presentation of the financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the interim periods.
The financial information as of October 2, 2005, is derived from the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements and notes for the fiscal year ended October 2, 2005 (“Fiscal 2005”), included in Item 8 in the Fiscal 2005 Annual Report on Form 10-K (“10-K”). The information included in this Form 10-Q should be read in conjunction with management’s discussion and analysis and notes to the financial statements in the 10-K.
Certain reclassifications of prior year’s balances have been made to conform to the current format.
The results of operations for the 13-week and 39-week periods ended July 2, 2006, are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations that may be achieved for the entire fiscal year ending October 1, 2006.
Note 2: Business Acquisitions
In January 2006, Starbucks increased its equity ownership to 100% in its operations in Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Previously the Company owned 5% of both Coffee Partners Hawaii and Cafe´ del Caribe in Puerto Rico. Because Coffee Partners Hawaii was a general partnership, the equity method of accounting was previously applied. Retroactive application of the equity method of accounting for the Puerto Rico investment, which was previously accounted for under the cost method, resulted in a reduction of retained earnings of $0.5 million as of April 2, 2006. Previously reported earnings per share amounts were not impacted as a result of this acquisition.
As shown in the tables below, the cumulative effect of the accounting change for financial results previously reported under the cost method and as restated in this report under the equity method reduced net earnings by $34 thousand for the 13 weeks ended January 1, 2006, and $97 thousand for the fiscal year ended October 2, 2005 (in thousands):
         
    Jan 1, 2006  
Fiscal quarter ended   (13 Weeks)  
Net earnings, as previously reported
  $ 174,190  
Effect of change to equity method
    (34 )
 
     
Net earnings, as restated for Puerto Rico acquisition
  $ 174,156  
 
     
The following table summarizes the effects of the investment accounting change on net earnings for the periods indicated (in thousands):
                                         
    Jan 2, 2005     Apr 3, 2005     Jul 3, 2005     Oct 2, 2005     Oct 2, 2005  
Fiscal period ended   (13 Weeks)     (13 Weeks)     (13 Weeks)     (13 Weeks)     (52 Weeks)  
Net earnings, as previously reported
  $ 144,710     $ 100,482     $ 125,528     $ 123,747     $ 494,467  
Effect of change to equity method
    (36 )     (21 )     (15 )     (25 )     (97 )
 
                             
Net earnings, as restated for Puerto Rico acquisition
  $ 144,674     $ 100,461     $ 125,513     $ 123,722     $ 494,370  
 
                             
Note 3: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation
The Company maintains several equity incentive plans under which it may grant non-qualified stock options, incentive stock options, restricted stock or stock appreciation rights to employees, non-employee directors and consultants. The Company also has employee stock purchase plans (“ESPP”).
Prior to the October 3, 2005 adoption of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Statement No. 123(R), “Share-Based Payment” (“SFAS 123R”), Starbucks accounted for stock-based compensation using the intrinsic value method prescribed in Accounting Principles Board (“APB”) Opinion No. 25, “Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees,” and related interpretations.

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Accordingly, because the stock option grant price equaled the market price on the date of grant, and any purchase discounts under the Company’s stock purchase plans were within statutory limits, no compensation expense was recognized by the Company for stock-based compensation. As permitted by SFAS No. 123, “Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation” (“SFAS 123”), stock-based compensation was included as a pro forma disclosure in the notes to the consolidated financial statements.
Effective October 3, 2005, the beginning of Starbucks first fiscal quarter of 2006, the Company adopted the fair value recognition provisions of SFAS 123R, using the modified-prospective transition method. Under this transition method, stock-based compensation expense was recognized in the consolidated financial statements for granted, modified, or settled stock options and for expense related to the ESPP, since the related purchase discounts exceeded the amount allowed under SFAS 123R for non-compensatory treatment. Compensation expense recognized included the estimated expense for stock options granted on and subsequent to October 3, 2005, based on the grant date fair value estimated in accordance with the provisions of SFAS 123R, and the estimated expense for the portion vesting in the period for options granted prior to, but not vested as of October 3, 2005, based on the grant date fair value estimated in accordance with the original provisions of SFAS 123. Results for prior periods have not been restated, as provided for under the modified-prospective method.
Total stock-based compensation expense recognized in the consolidated statement of earnings for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, was $27.4 million before income taxes and consisted of stock option and ESPP expense of $24.7 million and $2.7 million, respectively. Total stock-based compensation expense recognized in the consolidated statement of earnings for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, was $78.0 million before income taxes and consisted of stock option and ESPP expense of $70.6 million and $7.4 million, respectively. The related total tax benefit was $9.3 million and $26.6 million for the 13 weeks and 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, respectively. Capitalized stock-based compensation at July 2, 2006 was $1.2 million, and was included in property, plant and equipment, and inventory on the consolidated balance sheet.
Prior to the adoption of SFAS 123R, Starbucks presented all tax benefits resulting from the exercise of stock options as operating cash inflows in the consolidated statements of cash flows, in accordance with the provisions of the Emerging Issues Task Force (“EITF”) Issue No 00-15, “Classification in the Statement of Cash Flows of the Income Tax Benefit Received by a Company upon Exercise of a Nonqualified Employee Stock Option.” SFAS 123R requires the benefits of tax deductions in excess of the compensation cost recognized for those options to be classified as financing cash inflows rather than operating cash inflows, on a prospective basis. This amount is shown as “Excess tax benefit from exercise of stock options” on the consolidated statement of cash flows.
For option grants made in November 2003 and thereafter, the Company may provide for immediate vesting upon retirement for optionees who have attained at least 10 years of service and are age 55 or older. Prior to adoption of SFAS 123R, the Company amortized the expense over the related vesting period with acceleration of expense upon retirement. With the adoption of SFAS 123R, the accounting treatment for retirement features changed. Expense for awards made prior to adoption of SFAS 123R is still amortized over the vesting period until retirement, at which point any remaining unrecognized expense is immediately recognized. For awards made on or after October 3, 2005, the related expense is recognized either from grant date through the date the employee reaches the years of service and age requirements, or from grant date through the stated vesting period, whichever is shorter.
The following table shows the effect on net earnings and earnings per share had compensation cost been recognized based upon the estimated fair value on the grant date of stock options, and ESPP, in accordance with SFAS 123, as amended by SFAS No. 148 “Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation — Transition and Disclosure” (in thousands, except earnings per share):
                 
    13 Weeks Ended     39 Weeks Ended  
    July 3,     July 3,  
    2005     2005  
Net earnings
  $ 125,513     $ 370,648  
Deduct: stock-based compensation expense determined under fair value method, net of tax
    (15,276 )     (43,333 )
 
           
Pro forma net income
  $ 110,237     $ 327,315  
 
           
Earnings per share:
               
Basic — as reported
  $ 0.16     $ 0.47  
Deduct: stock-based compensation expense determined under fair value method, net of tax
    (0.02 )     (0.06 )
 
           
Basic — pro forma
  $ 0.14     $ 0.41  
 
           
                 
Diluted — as reported
  $ 0.16     $ 0.45  
Deduct: stock-based compensation expense determined under fair value method, net of tax
    (0.02 )     (0.05 )
 
           
Diluted — pro forma
  $ 0.14     $ 0.40  
 
           
Disclosures for the periods ended July 2, 2006 are not presented because the amounts are recognized in the consolidated financial statements.

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The fair value of stock awards was estimated at the date of grant using the Black-Scholes-Merton (“BSM”) option valuation model with the following weighted average assumptions for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006 and July 3, 2005:
                                 
    Employee Stock Options   ESPP
            July 3,           July 3,
    July 2,   2005   July 2,   2005
13 Weeks Ended   2006   (Pro forma)   2006   (Pro forma)
Expected term (in years)
    4.4       4.0       0.25 — 3.0       0.25 — 3.0  
Expected stock price volatility
    29%       31%       27% — 50%       24% — 33%  
Risk-free interest rate
    5.0%       3.8%       2.3% — 5.0%       2.9% — 3.2%  
Expected dividend yield
    0.0%       0.0%       0.0%       0.0%  
 
                               
Estimated fair value per option granted
    $11.87       $8.13       $7.98       $5.16  
The fair value of stock awards was estimated at the date of grant using the BSM option valuation model with the following weighted average assumptions for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006 and July 3, 2005:
                                 
    Employee Stock Options   ESPP
            July 3,           July 3,
    July 2,   2005   July 2,   2005
39 Weeks Ended   2006   (Pro forma)   2006   (Pro forma)
Expected term (in years)
    4.4       3.7       0.25 — 3.0       0.25 — 3.0  
Expected stock price volatility
    29%       33%       22% — 50%       20% — 58%  
Risk-free interest rate
    4.4%       3.5%       2.3% — 5.0%       1.9% — 3.2%  
Expected dividend yield
    0.0%       0.0%       0.0%       0.0%  
 
                               
Estimated fair value per option granted
    $9.58       $8.17       $6.35       $5.05  
The expected term of the options represents the estimated period of time until exercise and is based on historical experience of similar awards, giving consideration to the contractual terms, vesting schedules and expectations of future employee behavior. For 2006, expected stock price volatility is based on a combination of historical volatility of the Company’s stock and the one-year implied volatility of its traded options, for the related vesting periods. Prior to the adoption of SFAS 123R, expected stock price volatility was estimated using only historical volatility. The risk-free interest rate is based on the implied yield available on U.S. Treasury zero-coupon issues with an equivalent remaining term. The Company has not paid dividends in the past and does not plan to pay any dividends in the near future.
The BSM option valuation model was developed for use in estimating the fair value of traded options, which have no vesting restrictions and are fully transferable. In addition, option valuation models require the input of highly subjective assumptions, particularly for the expected term and expected stock price volatility. The Company’s employee stock options have characteristics significantly different from those of traded options, and changes in the subjective input assumptions can materially affect the fair value estimate. Because Company stock options do not trade on a secondary exchange, employees do not derive a benefit from holding stock options unless there is an increase, above the grant price, in the market price of the Company’s stock. Such an increase in stock price would benefit all shareholders commensurately. See Note 9 for additional details.
Stored Value Cards
Revenues from the Company’s stored value cards, such as the Starbucks Card, are recognized when tendered for payment, or upon redemption. Outstanding customer balances are included in “Deferred revenue” on the consolidated balance sheets. There are no expiration dates on the Company’s stored value cards, and Starbucks does not charge any service fees that cause a decrement to customer balances.
While the Company will continue to honor all stored value cards presented for payment, management may determine the likelihood of redemption to be remote for certain card balances due to, among other things, long periods of inactivity. In these circumstances, to the extent management determines there is no requirement for remitting card balances to government agencies under unclaimed property laws, card balances may be recognized in the consolidated statements of earnings in “Income and other income, net.” For the 13 weeks and 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, income recognized on unredeemed stored value card balances was $1.1 million and $3.4 million, respectively. There was no income recognized on unredeemed stored value card balances during the 13 weeks or 39 weeks ended July 3, 2005.
Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements
In July 2006, the FASB issued Interpretation No. 48 (“FIN 48”), “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes, an interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109,” which seeks to reduce the diversity in practice associated with the accounting and reporting for uncertainty in income tax positions. This Interpretation prescribes a comprehensive model for the financial statement recognition, measurement,

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presentation and disclosure of uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken in income tax returns. FIN 48 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2006 and the Company will adopt the new requirements in its fiscal first quarter of 2008. The cumulative effects, if any, of adopting FIN 48 will be recorded as an adjustment to retained earnings as of the beginning of the period of adoption. The Company has not yet determined the impact, if any, of adopting FIN 48 on its consolidated financial statements.
In November 2005, the FASB issued Staff Position No. FAS 123(R)-3, “Transition Election Related to Accounting for the Tax Effects of Share-Based Payment Awards” (“FSP 123R-3”). The Company has elected to adopt the alternative transition method provided in FSP 123R-3 for calculating the tax effects of stock-based compensation under SFAS 123R. The alternative transition method includes simplified methods to establish the beginning balance of the additional paid-in-capital pool (“APIC pool”) related to the tax effects of stock-based compensation, and for determining the subsequent impact on the APIC pool and consolidated statements of cash flows of the tax effects of stock-based compensation awards that are outstanding upon adoption of SFAS 123R.
In March 2005, the FASB issued Interpretation No. 47, “Accounting for Conditional Asset Retirement Obligations, an interpretation of FASB Statement No. 143” (“FIN 47”). FIN 47 requires the recognition of a liability for the fair value of a legally-required conditional asset retirement obligation when incurred, if the liability’s fair value can be reasonably estimated. FIN 47 also clarifies when an entity would have sufficient information to reasonably estimate the fair value of an asset retirement obligation. FIN 47 is effective for fiscal years ending after December 15, 2005, and Starbucks will adopt the new requirements at the end of its fiscal fourth quarter of 2006. The Company is in the process of determining the impact of adoption on its consolidated financial statements and currently estimates the cumulative impact upon adoption to total $0.05 per diluted share or less.
In December 2004, the FASB issued Staff Position No. FAS 109-2, “Accounting and Disclosure Guidance for the Foreign Earnings Repatriation Provision within the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004” (“FSP 109-2”). The American Jobs Creation Act allows a special one-time dividends received deduction on the repatriation of certain foreign earnings to a U.S. taxpayer (“repatriation provision”), provided certain criteria are met. The law allows the Company to make an election to repatriate earnings through fiscal 2006. FSP 109-2 provides accounting and disclosure guidance for the repatriation provision. Although FSP 109-2 was effective upon its issuance, it allows companies additional time beyond the enactment date to evaluate the effects of the provision on its plan for investment or repatriation of unremitted foreign earnings. During the Company’s fiscal third quarter of 2006, Starbucks completed its evaluation and decided not to elect repatriation of earnings under this provision.
Note 4: Derivative Financial Instruments
The Company manages its exposure to various risks within the consolidated financial statements according to an umbrella risk management policy. Under this policy, Starbucks may engage in transactions involving various derivative instruments with maturities generally not longer than five years, to hedge assets, liabilities, revenues and purchases.
Cash Flow Hedges
Starbucks, which includes subsidiaries that use their local currency as their functional currency, enters into cash flow derivative instruments to hedge portions of anticipated revenue streams and inventory purchases. Current forward contracts, which comprise the majority of the Company’s derivative instruments, hedge monthly forecasted revenue transactions denominated in Japanese yen and Canadian dollars, as well as forecasted inventory purchases denominated in U.S. dollars, euros and Swiss francs, for foreign operations. The Company also has swap contracts to hedge a small portion of its forecasted U.S. fluid milk purchases and futures contracts to hedge the variable price component for certain of its price-to-be-fixed green coffee purchase contracts.
The Company had accumulated net derivative losses of $6.1 million, net of taxes, in other comprehensive income as of July 2, 2006, related to cash flow hedges. Of this amount, $3.4 million of net derivative losses pertain to hedging instruments that will be dedesignated within 12 months and will also continue to experience fair value changes before affecting earnings. No cash flow hedges were discontinued and no ineffectiveness was recognized during the 13-week or 39-week periods ended July 2, 2006, and July 3, 2005. Current contracts will expire within 27 months.
Net Investment Hedges
Net investment derivative instruments are used to hedge the Company’s equity method investment in Starbucks Coffee Japan, Ltd. as well as the Company’s net investments in its Canadian and United Kingdom subsidiaries, to minimize foreign currency exposure. The Company applies the spot-to-spot method for these forward foreign exchange contracts, and under this method the change in fair value of the forward contracts attributable to the changes in spot exchange rates (the effective portion) is reported in other comprehensive income. The remaining change in fair value of the forward contract (the ineffective portion) is reclassified into earnings in “Interest and other income, net.” The Company had accumulated net derivative losses of $3.7 million, net of taxes, in other comprehensive income as of July 2, 2006, related to net investment derivative hedges. Current contracts expire within 36 months.
The following table presents the net gains and losses reclassified from other comprehensive income into the consolidated statements of

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earnings during the periods indicated for cash flow and net investment hedges (in thousands):
                                 
    13 Weeks Ended     39 Weeks Ended  
    July 2,     July 3,     July 2,     July 3,  
    2006     2005     2006     2005  
Cash flow hedges:
                               
Reclassified gains/(losses) into total net revenues
  $ 169     $ (49 )   $ 1,041     $ (812 )
Reclassified losses into cost of sales
    (1,924 )     (1,103 )     (5,492 )     (3,287 )
 
                       
Net reclassified losses — cash flow hedges
    (1,755 )     (1,152 )     (4,451 )     (4,099 )
Net reclassified gains — net investment hedges
    706       553       1,705       763  
 
                       
Total
  $ (1,049 )   $ (599 )   $ (2,746 )   $ (3,336 )
 
                       
Note 5: Inventories
Inventories consist of the following (in thousands):
                         
    July 2,     October 2,     July 3,  
    2006     2005     2005  
Coffee:
                       
Unroasted
  $ 324,254     $ 319,745     $ 315,993  
Roasted
    71,580       56,231       42,827  
Other merchandise held for sale
    81,224       109,094       73,825  
Packaging and other supplies
    80,301       61,229       62,897  
 
                 
Total
  $ 557,359     $ 546,299     $ 495,542  
 
                 
The Company had committed to fixed-price purchase contracts for green coffee totaling $388 million and $261 million as of July 2, 2006 and July 3, 2005, respectively. The Company believes, based on relationships established with its suppliers in the past, the risk of nondelivery on such purchase commitments is remote.
Note 6: Property, Plant, and Equipment
Property, plant and equipment are recorded at cost and consist of the following (in thousands):
                 
    July 2,     October 2,  
    2006     2005  
Land
  $ 30,716     $ 13,833  
Buildings
    96,008       68,180  
Leasehold improvements
    2,280,749       1,947,963  
Store equipment
    741,912       646,792  
Roasting equipment
    189,920       168,934  
Furniture, fixtures and other
    517,801       476,372  
 
           
 
    3,857,106       3,322,074  
Less: accumulated depreciation and amortization
    (1,890,079 )     (1,625,564 )
 
           
 
    1,967,027       1,696,510  
Work in progress
    123,876       145,509  
 
           
Property, plant and equipment, net
  $ 2,090,903     $ 1,842,019  
 
           
Note 7: Short-term Borrowings
As of July 2, 2006 the Company had $200 million outstanding under its $500 million revolving credit facility, which was entered into in August 2005. In addition, a letter of credit of $11.9 million was outstanding as of July 2, 2006, which reduces the borrowing capacity under the credit facility. As of October 2, 2005, the Company had $277 million outstanding, with no outstanding letters of credit. During the 39-weeks ended July 2, 2006, the Company had additional borrowings of $378 million under the credit facility and made principal repayments of $455 million. Interest expense on the Company’s short-term borrowings for the 13 weeks and 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006 was $0.6 million and $4.7 million, respectively. The weighted average contractual interest rates at July 2, 2006 and October 2, 2005 were 5.5% and 4.0%, respectively. The credit facility contains provisions that require the Company to maintain compliance with certain covenants, including the maintenance of certain financial ratios. As of July 2, 2006 and October 2, 2005, the Company was in compliance with each of these covenants.
Note 8: Shareholders’ Equity
Under the Company’s authorized share repurchase program, Starbucks acquired 11.1 million shares at an average price of $32.03 for a total amount of $354 million during the 39-week period ended July 2, 2006. Starbucks acquired 32.0 million shares at an average price of $25.24 for a total amount of $807 million during the 39-week period ended July 3, 2005. As of July 2, 2006, the Company had 11.0

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million additional shares authorized for repurchase. Share repurchases were funded through cash, cash equivalents, available-for-sale securities and borrowings under the revolving credit facility and were part of the Company’s active capital management program.
Comprehensive Income
Comprehensive income includes all changes in equity during the period, except those resulting from transactions with shareholders and subsidiaries of the Company. It has two components: net earnings and other comprehensive income. Accumulated other comprehensive income reported on the Company’s consolidated balance sheets consists of foreign currency translation adjustments and the unrealized gains and losses, net of applicable taxes, on available-for-sale securities and on derivative instruments designated and qualifying as cash flow and net investment hedges.
Comprehensive income, net of related tax effects, is as follows (in thousands):
                                 
    13 Weeks Ended     39 Weeks Ended  
    July 2,     July 3,     July 2,     July 3,  
    2006     2005     2006     2005  
Net earnings
  $ 145,498     $ 125,513     $ 446,970     $ 370,648  
 
                               
Unrealized holding gains/(losses) on cash flow hedging instruments
    (3,769 )     713       (4,467 )     (2,307 )
Unrealized holding gains/(losses) on net investment hedging instruments
    (1,654 )     1,412       (410 )     486  
Unrealized holding gains/(losses) on available-for-sale securities
    835       3       1,702       (1,339 )
Reclassification adjustment for (gains)/losses realized in net earnings
    (265 )     1,848       1,757       3,651  
 
                       
Net unrealized gains/(losses)
    (4,853 )     3,976       (1,418 )     491  
Translation adjustment
    15,586       (21,060 )     17,416       (4,794 )
 
                       
Total comprehensive income
  $ 156,231     $ 108,429     $ 462,968     $ 366,345  
 
                       
The favorable translation adjustment change for the 13-week period ended July 2, 2006, of $15.6 million was primarily due to the weakening of the U.S. dollar against several currencies, such as the euro, British pound sterling, Japanese yen and Canadian dollar. The unfavorable translation adjustment change for the 13-week period ended July 3, 2005, of $21.1 million was primarily due to the strengthening of the U.S. dollar against the euro and British pound sterling.
The favorable translation adjustment change for the 39-week period ended July 2, 2006, of $17.4 million was primarily due to the weakening of the U.S. dollar against several currencies, such as the euro, British pound sterling, Canadian dollar and Korean won. The unfavorable translation adjustment change for the 39-week period ended July 3, 2005, of $4.8 million was primarily due to the strengthening of the U.S. dollar against the euro.
The components of accumulated other comprehensive income, net of tax, were as follows (in thousands):
                 
    July 2,     October 2,  
    2006     2005  
 
               
Net unrealized holding losses on available-for-sale securities
  $ (38 )   $ (651 )
Net unrealized holding losses on hedging instruments
    (9,817 )     (7,786 )
Translation adjustment
    46,767       29,351  
 
           
Accumulated other comprehensive income
  $ 36,912     $ 20,914  
 
           
Note 9: Stock-Based Compensation
Stock Option Plans
Stock options to purchase the Company’s common stock are granted at prices at or above the fair market value on the date of grant. Options generally become exercisable in three or four equal installments beginning a year from the date of grant and generally expire 10 years from the date of grant. Options granted to non-employee directors generally vest over one year. Nearly all outstanding stock options are non-qualified stock options.
The fair value of each stock option granted is estimated on the date of grant using the BSM option valuation model. The assumptions used to calculate the fair value of options granted are evaluated and revised, as necessary, to reflect market conditions and the Company’s experience. Options granted are valued using the multiple option valuation approach, and the resulting expense is recognized using the graded, or accelerated, attribution method, consistent with the multiple option valuation approach. Compensation expense is recognized only for those options expected to vest, with forfeitures estimated at the date of grant based on the Company’s historical experience and future expectations. Prior to the adoption of SFAS 123R, the effect of forfeitures on the pro forma expense amounts was recognized as the forfeitures occurred.

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A summary of the Company’s stock option activity during the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006 is presented in the following table:
                                 
            Weighted Average   Weighted Average   Aggregate Intrinsic
    Shares   Exercise Price per   Remaining   Value
    Subject to Options   Share   Contractual Life   (in thousands)
Outstanding, October 2, 2005
    72,458,906     $ 13.22       6.3     $ 857,319  
Granted
    13,141,710       30.49                  
Exercised
    (10,814,571 )     9.48                  
Cancelled
    (2,579,231 )     24.21                  
                                 
Outstanding, July 2, 2006
    72,206,814       16.53       6.4       1,532,900  
                                 
 
                               
Exercisable, July 2, 2006
    42,229,498       10.56       4.8       1,148,772  
The aggregate intrinsic value in the table above is before applicable income taxes and represents the amount optionees would have received if all options had been exercised on the last business day of the period ended July 2, 2006, based on the Company’s closing stock price of $37.76. As of July 2, 2006, total unrecognized stock-based compensation expense related to nonvested stock options was approximately $95 million, before income taxes, and is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of approximately 23 months. During the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, the total intrinsic value of stock options exercised was $264 million. During the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, the total fair value of options vested was $15 million.
The Company issues new shares of common stock upon exercise of stock options.
As of July 2, 2006, there were 61.9 million shares of common stock available for issuance pursuant to future stock option grants. Additional information regarding options outstanding as of July 2, 2006, is as follows:
                                         
    Options Outstanding   Options Exercisable
            Weighted                
            Average   Weighted           Weighted
            Remaining   Average           Average
Range of           Contractual   Exercise           Exercise
Exercise Prices   Shares   Life (Years)   Price   Shares   Price
$3.96 — $7.40
    17,980,157       2.7     $ 5.64       17,980,157     $ 5.64  
7.75 — 11.00
    14,515,950       5.6       10.25       12,421,991       10.23  
11.08 — 21.79
    14,459,180       7.2       15.04       8,346,143       14.67  
22.71 — 30.28
    13,439,866       8.5       27.09       3,443,341       27.20  
30.42 — 37.86
    11,811,661       9.4       30.63       37,866       30.52  
                                         
 
    72,206,814       6.4       16.53       42,229,498       10.56  
                                         
Employee Stock Purchase Plans
The Company has an employee stock purchase plan allowing eligible employees to contribute up to 10% of their base earnings toward the quarterly purchase of the Company’s common stock. The employee’s purchase price is 85% of the lesser of the fair market value of the stock on the first business day or the last business day of the quarterly offering period. Employees may purchase shares having a fair market value of up to $25,000 (measured as of the first day of each quarterly offering period for each calendar year). The total number of shares issuable under the plan is 32.0 million. There were 1.1 million shares issued under the plan during the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006 at an average price of $26.11. Since inception of the plan, 15.9 million shares have been purchased, leaving 16.1 million shares available for future issuance.
Starbucks has an additional employee stock purchase plan in the United Kingdom that allows eligible U.K. employees to save toward the purchase of the Company’s common stock. Under the Save-As-You-Earn (“SAYE”) plan the employee’s purchase price is 85% of the fair value of the stock on the first business day of a three-year offering period. The total number of shares issuable under the plan is 1.2 million. There were 35,190 shares issued under the plan during the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006 at an average price of $8.84, and 1.1 million shares remain available for future issuance. During fiscal 2004, the Company suspended future offerings under this plan. The last offering was made in December 2002 and matured in February 2006.
A new employee stock purchase plan, the U.K. Share Incentive Plan, was introduced during fiscal 2004 to replace the SAYE plan. It allows eligible U.K. employees to purchase shares of common stock through payroll deductions during six-month offering periods at the lesser of the fair market value of the stock at the beginning or at the end of the offering period. The Company will award one matching share for each six shares purchased under the plan. The total number of shares issuable under the plan is 1.4 million. There were 11,138 shares issued under the plan during the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006 at an average price of $26.42. As of July 2, 2006, 1.38 million shares were available for future issuance.

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Note 10: Earnings Per Share
The following table represents the calculation of net earnings per common share — basic and diluted (in thousands, except earnings per share):
                                 
    13 Weeks Ended     39 Weeks Ended  
    July 2,     July 3,     July 2,     July 3,  
    2006     2005     2006     2005  
Net earnings
  $ 145,498     $ 125,513     $ 446,970     $ 370,648  
Weighted average common shares and common stock units outstanding (for basic calculation)
    769,825       783,632       768,108       795,528  
Dilutive effect of outstanding common stock options
    28,434       24,405       27,177       26,717  
 
                       
Weighted average common and common equivalent shares outstanding (for diluted calculation)
    798,259       808,037       795,285       822,245  
 
                       
 
                               
Net earnings per common share — basic
  $ 0.19     $ 0.16     $ 0.58     $ 0.47  
Net earnings per common and common equivalent share — diluted
  $ 0.18     $ 0.16     $ 0.56     $ 0.45  
Potential dilutive shares consist of the incremental common shares issuable upon the exercise of outstanding stock options (both vested and non-vested) using the treasury stock method. Potential dilutive shares are excluded from the computation of earnings per share if their effect is antidilutive. For the 13-week period ended July 2, 2006, antidilutive options totaled 433 thousand, and for the 13-week period ended July 3, 2005, totaled 13.4 million. For the 39-week period ended July 2, 2006, antidilutive options totaled 10.0 million, and for the 39-week period ended July 3, 2005, totaled 11.3 million.
Note 11: Commitments and Contingencies
Guarantees
The Company has unconditionally guaranteed the repayment of certain Japanese yen-denominated bank loans and related interest and fees of an unconsolidated equity investee, Starbucks Coffee Japan, Ltd. The guarantees continue until the loans, including accrued interest and fees, have been paid in full, with the final loan amount due in 2014. The maximum amount is limited to the sum of unpaid principal and interest amounts, as well as other related expenses. These amounts will vary based on fluctuations in the yen foreign exchange rate. As of July 2, 2006, the maximum amount of the guarantees was approximately $6.8 million. Because there has been no modification of these loan guarantees subsequent to the Company’s adoption of FASB Interpretation No. 45, “Guarantor’s Accounting and Disclosure Requirements for Guarantees, Including Indebtedness of Others,” Starbucks has applied the disclosure provisions only and has not recorded the guarantee on its consolidated balance sheet.
Starbucks has commitments under which it has unconditionally guaranteed its proportionate share, or 50%, of certain borrowings of unconsolidated equity investees. The Company’s maximum exposure is approximately $7.3 million, excluding interest and other related costs and the majority of these commitments expire in 2007 and 2011. As of July 2, 2006, the Company recorded $3.0 million to “Equity and other investments” and “Other long-term liabilities” on the consolidated balance sheet for the fair value of the guarantee arrangements.
Product Warranties
Coffee brewing and espresso equipment sold to the Company’s licensees for use in retail licensing operations are under warranty for defects in materials and workmanship for a period ranging from 12 months to 24 months. The Company establishes an accrual for estimated warranty costs at the time of sale, based on historical experience. Product warranty costs and changes to the related accrual were not significant for the 39-week period ended July 2, 2006.
Legal Proceedings
On June 3, 2004, two then-current employees of the Company filed a lawsuit, entitled Sean Pendlebury and Laurel Overton v. Starbucks Coffee Company, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida claiming the Company violated requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). The suit alleges that the Company misclassified its retail store managers as exempt from the overtime provisions of the FLSA, and that each manager therefore is entitled to overtime compensation for any week in which he or she worked more than 40 hours during the three years before joining the suit as a plaintiff, and for as long as they remain a manager thereafter. Plaintiffs seek to represent themselves and all similarly situated U.S. current and former store managers of the Company. Plaintiffs seek reimbursement for an unspecified amount of unpaid overtime compensation, liquidated damages, attorney’s fees and costs. Plaintiffs also filed on June 3, 2004 a motion for conditional collective action treatment and court-supervised notice to additional putative class members under the opt-in procedures in section 16(b) of the FLSA. On January 3, 2005, the district court entered an order authorizing nationwide notice of the lawsuit to all current and former store managers employed by the Company during the three years before the suit was filed. The Company filed a motion for summary judgment as to the claims of the named plaintiffs on September 24, 2004.

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The court denied that motion because this case was in the early stages of discovery, but the court noted that the Company may resubmit this motion at a later date. Starbucks believes that the plaintiffs are properly classified as exempt under the federal wage laws and that a loss in this case is unlikely. The Company cannot estimate the possible loss to the Company, if any. Trial is currently set for May 2007. The Company intends to vigorously defend the lawsuit.
On March 11, 2005, a former employee of the Company filed a lawsuit, entitled James Falcon v. Starbucks Corporation and Does 1 through 100, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas claiming that the Company violated requirements of the FLSA. Specifically, the plaintiff claims that the Company misclassified its retail assistant store managers as exempt from the overtime provisions of the FLSA and that each assistant manager therefore is entitled to overtime compensation for any week in which he or she worked more than 40 hours during the three years before joining the suit as a plaintiff, and for as long as they remain an assistant manager thereafter. On August 18, 2005, the plaintiff amended his complaint to include allegations that he and other retail assistant store managers were not paid overtime compensation for all hours worked in excess of 40 hours in a work week after they were re-classified as non-exempt employees in September 2002. In both claims, Plaintiff seeks to represent himself and a putative class of all current and former assistant store managers employed by the Company in the United States from March 11, 2002 until the present. He also seeks, on behalf of himself and the class, reimbursement for an unspecified amount of unpaid overtime compensation, liquidated damages, injunctive relief, and attorney’s fees and costs. On September 13, 2005, the plaintiff filed a motion for conditional collective action treatment and court-supervised notice to all putative class members under the opt-in procedures in section 16(b) of the FLSA. On November 29, 2005, the court entered an order authorizing notice to the class of the existence of the lawsuit and their opportunity to join as plaintiffs. The Company has a policy requiring that all non-exempt partners, including assistant store managers, be paid for all hours worked, including any hours worked in excess of 40 per week. The Company also believes that this policy is, and at all relevant times has been, communicated and followed consistently. Further, the Company believes that the plaintiff and other assistant store managers were properly classified as exempt under the FLSA prior to September 2002. The Company cannot estimate the possible loss to the Company, if any, and believes that a loss in this case is unlikely. No trial date has been set. The Company intends to vigorously defend the lawsuit.
On October 8, 2004, a former hourly employee of the Company filed a lawsuit in San Diego County Superior Court entitled Jou Chau v. Starbucks Coffee Company. The lawsuit alleges that the Company violated the California Labor Code by allowing shift supervisors to receive tips. More specifically, the lawsuit alleges that since shift supervisors direct the work of baristas, they qualify as “agents” of the Company and are therefore excluded from receiving tips under California Labor Code Section 351, which prohibits employers and their agents from collecting or receiving tips left by patrons for other employees. The lawsuit further alleges that because the tipping practices violate the Labor Code, they also are unfair practices under the California Unfair Competition Law. In addition to recovery of an unspecified amount of tips distributed to shift supervisors, the lawsuit seeks penalties under California Labor Code Section 203 for willful failure to pay wages due. Plaintiff also seeks attorneys’ fees and costs. On March 30, 2006, the Court issued an order certifying the case as a class action, with the plaintiff representing a class of all persons employed as baristas in the state of California since October 8, 2000. The size of the class has yet to be determined. The Company cannot estimate the possible loss to the Company, if any. The Company believes its practices comply with California law, and the Company intends to vigorously defend the lawsuit. Trial is currently set for May 2007.
The Company is party to various other legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of its business, but it is not currently a party to any legal proceeding that management believes would have a material adverse effect on the consolidated financial position or results of operations of the Company.

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Note 12: Segment Reporting
Segment information is prepared on the basis that the Company’s management reviews financial information for operational decision making purposes. The tables below present information by operating segment (in thousands):
                                 
    United           Unallocated    
13 Weeks Ended   States(1)   International(1)   Corporate(2)   Total
 
                               
July 2, 2006
                               
Total net revenues
  $ 1,605,477       $358,196     $     $ 1,963,673  
Earnings/(loss) before income taxes
    265,119       29,412       (74,930 )     219,601  
Depreciation and amortization expenses
    71,435       18,089       9,015       98,539  
Income from equity investees
    15,478       10,188             25,666  
Provision for impairments and asset retirements
    1,830       1,027       7       2,864  
 
                               
July 3, 2005
                               
Total net revenues
  $ 1,339,440     $ 262,359     $     $ 1,601,799  
Earnings/(loss) before income taxes
    244,812       18,860       (60,867 )     202,805  
Depreciation and amortization expenses
    63,027       14,015       8,321       85,363  
Income from equity investees
    10,105       7,969             18,074  
Provision for impairments and asset retirements
    7,591       1,004       10       8,605  
                                 
    United           Unallocated    
39 Weeks Ended   States(1)   International(1)   Corporate(2)   Total
 
                               
July 2, 2006
                               
Total net revenues
  $ 4,796,554     $ 987,033     $     $ 5,783,587  
Earnings/(loss) before income taxes
    870,744       87,711       (253,702 )     704,753  
Depreciation and amortization expenses
    208,255       49,843       26,237       284,335  
Income from equity investees
    37,938       27,433             65,371  
Provision for impairments and asset retirements
    5,742       6,283       (8 )     12,017  
 
                               
July 3, 2005
                               
Total net revenues
  $ 3,954,631     $ 755,428     $     $ 4,710,059  
Earnings/(loss) before income taxes
    706,285       55,989       (165,900 )     596,374  
Depreciation and amortization expenses
    185,181       41,232       25,281       251,694  
Income from equity investees
    27,377       19,802             47,179  
Provision for impairments and asset retirements
    10,941       2,819       1,399       15,159  
 
(1)   For purposes of internal management and segment reporting, Company-operated operations in Hawaii and Puerto Rico are included in the International segment to conform to the organizational alignment of the Company.
 
(2)   Unallocated corporate includes certain general and administrative expenses, related depreciation and amortization expenses and certain amounts included in “Interest and other income, net” on the consolidated statements of earnings.
The table below represents information by geographic area (in thousands):
                                 
    13 Weeks Ended     39 Weeks Ended  
    July 2,     July 3,     July 2,     July 3,  
    2006     2005     2006     2005  
Net revenues from external customers:
                               
United States
  $ 1,625,589     $ 1,342,787     $ 4,837,705     $ 3,963,508  
Foreign countries
    338,084       259,012       945,882       746,551  
 
                       
Total
  $ 1,963,673     $ 1,601,799     $ 5,783,587     $ 4,710,059  
 
                       
No customer accounts for 10% or more of the Company’s revenues. Revenues from foreign countries are based on the geographic location of the customers and consist primarily of revenues from the United Kingdom and Canada, which together account for approximately 76% of foreign net revenues.

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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
CAUTIONARY STATEMENT PURSUANT TO THE PRIVATE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995
Certain statements herein, including anticipated store openings, trends in or expectations regarding Starbucks Corporation’s revenue, comparable store sales and net earnings growth, effective tax rate, cash flow requirements and capital expenditures, all constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements are based on currently available operating, financial and competitive information and are subject to various risks and uncertainties. Actual future results and trends may differ materially depending on a variety of factors, including, but not limited to, coffee, dairy and other raw materials prices and availability, successful execution of internal performance and expansion plans, fluctuations in United States and international economies and currencies, ramifications from the war on terrorism, or other international events or developments, the impact of competitors’ initiatives, the effect of legal proceedings, and other risks detailed herein and in Starbucks Corporation’s other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including the Item 1A. “Risks Factors” section of the Starbucks Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended October 2, 2005.
A forward-looking statement is neither a prediction nor a guarantee of future events or circumstances, and those future events or circumstances may not occur. Users should not place undue reliance on the forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this report. The Company is under no obligation to update or alter any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.
This information should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and the notes included in Item 1 of Part I of this Quarterly Report and the audited consolidated financial statements and notes, and Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended October 2, 2005.
General
Starbucks Corporation’s fiscal year ends on the Sunday closest to September 30. Fiscal year 2005 had 52 weeks and the fiscal year ending on October 1, 2006 will also include 52 weeks.
Management Overview
During both the 13 weeks and 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, the Company’s focus on execution in all areas of its business, from U.S. and International Company-operated retail operations to the Company’s specialty businesses, delivered strong financial performance. Management believes that its ability to achieve the balance between growing the core business and building the foundation for future growth is the key to increasing long-term shareholder value. Starbucks quarterly and year to date fiscal 2006 performance reflects the Company’s continuing commitment to achieving this balance.
The primary driver of the Company’s revenue growth continues to be the opening of new retail stores, both Company-operated and licensed, in support of the Company’s objective to establish Starbucks as one of the most recognized and respected brands in the world. Starbucks has opened 1,543 new stores in the first three quarters of this fiscal year and expects to open at least 2,000 total new stores during fiscal 2006. With a presence today in 37 countries, serving more than 40 million customers per week, management continues to believe that the Company’s long-term goal of 15,000 Starbucks retail locations throughout the United States and at least 15,000 stores in International markets is achievable.
In addition to opening new retail stores, Starbucks is targeting to increase revenues generated at new and existing Company-operated stores by attracting new customers and increasing the frequency of visits by current customers. The strategy is to increase first year average store sales and comparable store sales by continuously improving the level of customer service, introducing innovative products and improving service with speed through training, technology and process improvement.
In licensed retail operations, Starbucks shares operating and store development experience to help licensees improve the profitability of existing stores and build new stores. Internationally, the Company’s strategy is to selectively increase its equity stake in licensed international operations as these markets develop. In January 2006, the Company increased its equity ownership from 5% to 100% in its operations in Hawaii and Puerto Rico.
The combination of more retail stores, comparable store sales growth of 6% and growth in other business channels in both the U.S. and International operating segments resulted in a 23% increase in total net revenues for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to the same period of fiscal 2005. The Company’s three to five year revenue growth target is approximately 20%. Comparable store sales growth for the remainder of fiscal 2006 is expected to be in the range of 3% to 7%, with monthly anomalies.
For the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, operating income as a percentage of total net revenues decreased to 10.9% from 12.5% in the

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same period of fiscal 2005, primarily due to the recognition of stock-based compensation. For the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, operating income as a percentage of total net revenues decreased to 12.0% from 12.4% in the same period of fiscal 2005, due to the recognition of stock-based compensation. Net earnings increased by 16% and 21% during the 13 weeks and 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, respectively. Reported margin and net earnings increases include the effects of stock-based compensation in the 13 weeks and 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, while stock-based compensation expense was not included in the Company’s consolidated financial results in fiscal 2005.
Results of Operations for the 13 Weeks Ended July 2, 2006 and July 3, 2005
CONSOLIDATED RESULTS
The following table presents the consolidated statements of earnings as well as the percentage relationship to total net revenues of items included in the Company’s consolidated statements of earnings (amounts in thousands):
                                         
    13 Weeks Ended     13 Weeks Ended  
    July 2,     July 3,     %     July 2,     July 3,  
    2006     2005     Change     2006     2005  
                            As a % of total net revenues  
STATEMENTS OF EARNINGS DATA
                                       
 
                                       
Net revenues:
                                       
Company-operated retail
  $ 1,660,977     $ 1,356,605       22.4 %     84.6 %     84.7 %
Specialty:
                                       
Licensing
    216,267       170,330       27.0 %     11.0 %     10.6 %
Foodservice and other
    86,429       74,864       15.4 %     4.4 %     4.7 %
 
                               
Total specialty
    302,696       245,194       23.5 %     15.4 %     15.3 %
 
                               
Total net revenues
    1,963,673       1,601,799       22.6 %     100.0 %     100.0 %
 
                                       
Cost of sales including occupancy costs
    804,889       649,831               41.0 %     40.6 %
Store operating expenses (1)
    686,602       546,008               35.0 %     34.1 %
Other operating expenses (2)
    69,478       48,464               3.5 %     2.9 %
Depreciation and amortization expenses
    98,539       85,363               5.0 %     5.3 %
General and administrative expenses
    115,258       90,637               5.9 %     5.7 %
 
                               
Subtotal operating expenses
    1,774,766       1,420,303       25.0 %     90.4 %     88.6 %
Income from equity investees
    25,666       18,074               1.3 %     1.1 %
 
                               
Operating income
    214,573       199,570       7.5 %     10.9 %     12.5 %
Interest and other income, net
    5,028       3,235               0.3 %     0.2 %
 
                               
Earnings before income taxes
    219,601       202,805       8.3 %     11.2 %     12.7 %
Income taxes
    74,103       77,292               3.8 %     4.9 %
 
                               
Net earnings
  $ 145,498     $ 125,513       15.9 %     7.4 %     7.8 %
 
                               
 
(1)   As a percentage of related Company-operated retail revenues, store operating expenses were 41.3% for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, and 40.2% for the 13 weeks ended July 3, 2005.
 
(2)   As a percentage of related total specialty revenues, other operating expenses were 23.0% for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, and 19.8% for the 13 weeks ended July 3, 2005.
Net revenues for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, increased 23% to $2.0 billion from $1.6 billion for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005, driven by increases in both Company-operated retail revenues and specialty operations. Net revenues are expected to grow approximately 20% in fiscal 2006 compared to fiscal 2005.
During the 13-week period ended July 2, 2006, Starbucks derived 85% of total net revenues from its Company-operated retail stores. Company-operated retail revenues increased 22% to $1.7 billion for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from $1.4 billion for the same period in fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily attributable to the opening of 955 new Company-operated retail stores in the last 12 months and comparable store sales growth of 6% for the quarter. The increase in comparable store sales was due to a 4% increase in the number of customer transactions and a 2% increase in the average value per transaction. Management believes increased traffic in Company-operated retail stores continues to be driven by sustained popularity of core products, new product innovation, and a high level of customer satisfaction.
The Company derived the remaining 15% of total net revenues from channels outside the Company-operated retail stores, collectively known as “Specialty Operations.” Specialty revenues, which include licensing revenues and foodservice and other revenues, increased 23% to $303 million for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $245 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005.
Licensing revenues, which are derived from retail store licensing arrangements, as well as grocery, warehouse club, and certain other branded-product licensed operations, increased 27% to $216 million primarily due to higher product sales and royalty revenues from the opening of 1,158 new licensed retail stores in the last 12 months and, to a lesser extent, growth in the licensed grocery and warehouse club business. Foodservice and other revenues increased 15% to $86 million primarily due to growth in the U.S. foodservice business.

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Cost of sales including occupancy costs increased to 41.0% of total net revenues for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to 40.6% in the corresponding 13-week period of fiscal 2005. This increase was due to higher green coffee costs.
Store operating expenses as a percentage of Company-operated retail revenues increased to 41.3% for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from 40.2% for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005, primarily due to higher payroll-related expenditures from the recognition of stock-based compensation expense and higher employee benefits costs. In addition, the Company held regional leadership conferences for its retail management employees during its third fiscal quarter of 2006, which replaced a North American leadership conference held during the fiscal second quarter of 2005.
Other operating expenses (expenses associated with the Company’s specialty operations) increased to 23.0% of total specialty revenues for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to 19.8% in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily due to higher marketing and advertising costs related to Starbucks ready-to-drink coffee beverages in Japan, Taiwan and Korea as well as in the emerging U.S. Entertainment business. In addition, the recognition of stock-based compensation expense increased payroll-related expenditures.
Depreciation and amortization expenses increased to $99 million for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $85 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily due to the opening of 955 new Company-operated retail stores in the last 12 months. As a percentage of total net revenues, depreciation and amortization expenses decreased to 5.0% for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from 5.3% for the corresponding 13-week period of fiscal 2005.
General and administrative expenses increased to $115 million for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $91 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily due to higher payroll-related expenditures from stock-based compensation and additional employees to support continued global growth. As a percentage of total net revenues, general and administrative expenses increased to 5.9% for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from 5.7% for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005.
Income from equity investees increased 42% to $26 million for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $18 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily due to volume-driven results for The North American Coffee Partnership, which produces bottled Frappuccino® and Starbucks DoubleShot® coffee drinks, and improved results from international investees, particularly in Japan.
Operating income increased 8% to $215 million for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $200 million for the corresponding 13-week period of fiscal 2005. Operating margin decreased to 10.9% of total net revenues for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to 12.5% for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005, primarily due to the recognition of stock-based compensation.
Interest and other income increased to $5.0 million for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $3.2 million in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005, primarily due to an increase in foreign exchange gains.
Income taxes for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, resulted in an effective tax rate of 33.7%, compared to 38.1% for the corresponding 13-week period of fiscal 2005. The decline in the effective tax rate was primarily due to the settlement in the current period of a multi-year income tax audit in a foreign jurisdiction for which the Company had established a contingent liability. The Company currently estimates that its effective tax rate for the fourth quarter of fiscal 2006 will approximate 38%.
Net earnings for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, increased 16% to $145 million from $126 million for the same period in fiscal 2005. Earnings per share were $0.18 for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, including a $0.01 per share benefit from the tax settlement discussed above, compared to $0.16 per share for the comparable period in fiscal 2005.

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SEGMENT RESULTS
Segment information is prepared on the basis that the Company’s management reviews financial information for operational decision-making purposes. The tables below present operating segment results net of intersegment eliminations for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006 and July 3, 2005 (in thousands):
                                         
    13 Weeks Ended   13 Weeks Ended
    July 2,   July 3,   %   July 2,   July 3,
    2006   2005   Change   2006   2005
                            As a % of U.S.
United States                           total net revenues
Net revenues:
                                       
Company-operated retail
  $ 1,364,075     $ 1,141,555       19.5 %     85.0 %     85.2 %
Specialty:
                                       
Licensing
    162,421       129,355       25.6 %     10.1 %     9.7 %
Foodservice and other
    78,981       68,530       15.3 %     4.9 %     5.1 %
                 
Total specialty
    241,402       197,885       22.0 %     15.0 %     14.8 %
                 
Total net revenues
    1,605,477       1,339,440       19.9 %     100.0 %     100.0 %
 
                                       
Cost of sales including occupancy costs
    633,782       516,368               39.5 %     38.6 %
Store operating expenses
    574,460       465,021               42.1 %(1)     40.7 %(1)
Other operating expenses
    53,588       40,793               22.2 %(2)     20.6 %(2)
Depreciation and amortization expenses
    71,435       63,027               4.4 %     4.7 %
General and administrative expenses
    23,427       19,266               1.5 %     1.4 %
 
                                       
Income from equity investees
    15,478       10,105               1.0 %     0.8 %
                 
Operating income
  $ 264,263     $ 245,070       7.8 %     16.5 %     18.3 %
                 
 
                            As a % of International
International                           total net revenues
Net revenues:
                                       
Company-operated retail
  $      296,902     $      215,050       38.1 %     82.9 %     82.0 %
Specialty:
                                       
Licensing
    53,846       40,975       31.4 %     15.0 %     15.6 %
Foodservice and other
    7,448       6,334       17.6 %     2.1 %     2.4 %
                 
Total specialty
    61,294       47,309       29.6 %     17.1 %     18.0 %
                 
Total net revenues
    358,196       262,359       36.5 %     100.0 %     100.0 %
 
                                       
Cost of sales including occupancy costs
    171,107       133,463               47.8 %     50.9 %
Store operating expenses
    112,142       80,987               37.8 %(1)     37.7 %(1)
Other operating expenses
    15,890       7,671               25.9 %(2)     16.2 %(2)
Depreciation and amortization expenses
    18,089       14,015               5.1 %     5.3 %
General and administrative expenses
    21,878       15,332               6.1 %     5.8 %
 
                                       
Income from equity investees
    10,188       7,969               2.9 %     3.0 %
                 
Operating income
  $ 29,278     $ 18,860       55.2 %     8.2 %     7.2 %
                 
 
                            As a % of
Unallocated Corporate                           total net revenues
Depreciation and amortization expenses
  $ 9,015     $ 8,321               0.5 %     0.5 %
General and administrative expenses
    69,953       56,039               3.5 %     3.5 %
                 
Operating loss
  $ (78,968 )   $ (64,360 )             (4.0 )%         (4.0 )%    
                 
 
(1)   Shown as a percentage of related Company-operated retail revenues.
 
(2)   Shown as a percentage of related total specialty revenues.

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United States
United States operations (“United States”) sells coffee and other beverages, whole bean coffees, complementary food, coffee brewing equipment and merchandise primarily through Company-operated retail stores. Specialty operations within the United States include retail store and other licensing operations, foodservice accounts and other initiatives related to the Company’s core businesses.
United States total net revenues increased by 20% to $1.6 billion for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $1.3 billion for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. United States Company-operated retail revenues increased by $223 million, or 19%, to $1.4 billion, primarily due to the opening of 727 new Company-operated retail stores in the last 12 months and comparable store sales growth of 6% for the quarter. The increase in comparable store sales was due to a 5% increase in the number of customer transactions and a 1% increase in the average value per transaction.
Total United States specialty revenues increased by 22% to $241 million for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $198 million in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. United States licensing revenues increased 26% to $162 million from $129 million in fiscal 2005, primarily due to higher product sales and royalty revenues as a result of opening 730 new licensed retail stores in the last 12 months and, to a lesser extent, growth in the licensed grocery and warehouse club business. United States foodservice and other revenues increased to $79 million, or 15%, from $69 million in fiscal 2005, primarily due to growth in new and existing foodservice accounts.
United States operating income increased by 8% to $264 million for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from $245 million for the same period in fiscal 2005. Operating margin decreased to 16.5% of related revenues from 18.3% in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The decrease was primarily due to higher store operating expenses from increased payroll-related expenditures and costs incurred related to regional leadership conferences, which were held during the third fiscal quarter of fiscal 2006, compared to the second quarter in fiscal 2005. Additionally, costs of sales including occupancy increased due to higher green coffee costs and higher distribution and utilities costs.
International
International operations (“International”) sells coffee and other beverages, whole bean coffees, complementary food, coffee brewing equipment and merchandise through Company-operated retail stores in the United Kingdom, Canada, Thailand, Australia, Hawaii, Germany, Singapore, China, Puerto Rico, Chile and Ireland. Specialty Operations in International primarily include retail store licensing operations in 25 other countries and foodservice accounts in Canada and the United Kingdom. The Company’s International store base continues to increase rapidly and Starbucks is achieving a growing contribution from established areas of the business while at the same time investing in emerging markets and channels, such as China. Certain of these markets are in various early stages of development that require a more extensive support organization, relative to the current levels of revenue and operating income, than in the United States. This continuing investment is part of the Company’s long-term, balanced plan for profitable growth.
International total net revenues increased by 37% to $358 million for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $262 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005.
International Company-operated retail revenues increased by 38% to $297 million, primarily due to the opening of 228 new Company-operated retail stores in the last 12 months and comparable store sales growth of 7% for the quarter. The increase in comparable store sales resulted from a 4% increase in the number of customer transactions coupled with a 3% increase in the average value per transaction.
Total international specialty revenues increased by 30% to $61 million for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $47 million in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily due to higher product sales and royalty revenues from opening 428 licensed retail stores in the last 12 months and sales of ready-to-drink coffee beverages introduced in Japan, Taiwan and Korea in the fall of 2005.
International operating income increased by 55% to $29 million for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $19 million in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. Operating margin increased to 8.2% of related revenues from 7.2% in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. This improvement was primarily due to lower costs of sales including occupancy costs due primarily to leverage gained from fixed costs distributed over an expanded revenue base. The improvement was offset in part by higher marketing expenditures in support of the re-introduction of one of the Company’s ready-to-drink coffee beverages in Japan and higher payroll-related expenditures to support global expansion. As discussed above, the Company continues to invest in its international infrastructure including investments in emerging markets. The timing and magnitude of these investments can be expected to cause variation in future quarterly operating margins for the International segment.

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Unallocated Corporate
Unallocated corporate expenses pertain to certain functions, such as executive management, accounting, administration, tax, treasury, and information technology infrastructure, which are not specifically attributable to the Company’s operating segments and include related depreciation and amortization expenses. Unallocated corporate expenses increased to $79 million for the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $64 million in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005, primarily due to higher payroll-related expenses from stock-based compensation and additional employees to support continued rapid global growth. Total unallocated corporate expenses as a percentage of total net revenues were 4.0% for both the 13 weeks ended July 2, 2006 and July 3, 2005.
Results of Operations for the 39 Weeks Ended July 2, 2006 and July 3, 2005
CONSOLIDATED RESULTS
The following table presents the consolidated statements of earnings as well as the percentage relationship to total net revenues of items included in the Company’s consolidated statements of earnings (amounts in thousands):
                                         
    39 Weeks Ended     39 Weeks Ended  
    July 2,     July 3,     %     July 2,     July 3,  
    2006     2005     Change     2006     2005  
                            As a % of total net revenues  
STATEMENTS OF EARNINGS DATA
                                       
 
                                       
Net revenues:
                                       
Company-operated retail
  $ 4,888,804     $ 3,999,213       22.2 %     84.5 %     84.9 %
Specialty:
                                       
Licensing
    637,771       488,835       30.5 %     11.0 %     10.4 %
Foodservice and other
    257,012       222,011       15.8 %     4.5 %     4.7 %
 
                               
Total specialty
    894,783       710,846       25.9 %     15.5 %     15.1 %
 
                               
Total net revenues
    5,783,587       4,710,059       22.8 %     100.0 %     100.0 %
 
                                       
Cost of sales including occupancy costs
    2,343,800       1,926,326               40.5 %     40.9 %
Store operating expenses (1)
    1,974,041       1,599,958               34.2 %     34.0 %
Other operating expenses (2)
    192,274       139,092               3.3 %     3.0 %
Depreciation and amortization expenses
    284,335       251,694               4.9 %     5.3 %
General and administrative expenses
    358,194       256,165               6.2 %     5.4 %
 
                               
Subtotal operating expenses
    5,152,644       4,173,235       23.5 %     89.1 %     88.6 %
Income from equity investees
    65,371       47,179               1.1 %     1.0 %
 
                               
Operating income
    696,314       584,003       19.2 %     12.0 %     12.4 %
Interest and other income, net
    8,439       12,371               0.2 %     0.3 %
 
                               
Earnings before income taxes
    704,753       596,374       18.2 %     12.2 %     12.7 %
Income taxes
    257,783       225,726               4.5 %     4.8 %
 
                               
Net earnings
  $ 446,970     $ 370,648       20.6 %     7.7 %     7.9 %
 
                               
 
(1)   As a percentage of related Company-operated retail revenues, store operating expenses were 40.4% for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, and 40.0% for the 39 weeks ended July 3, 2005.
 
(2)   As a percentage of related total specialty revenues, other operating expenses were 21.5% for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, and 19.6% for the 39 weeks ended July 3, 2005.
Net revenues for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, increased 23% to $5.8 billion from $4.7 billion for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005, driven by increases in both Company-operated retail revenues and specialty operations. Net revenues are expected to grow approximately 20% in fiscal 2006 compared to fiscal 2005.
During the 39-week period ended July 2, 2006, Starbucks derived 85% of total net revenues from its Company-operated retail stores. Company-operated retail revenues increased 22% to $4.9 billion for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from $4.0 billion for the same period in fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily attributable to the opening of 955 new Company-operated retail stores in the last 12 months and comparable store sales growth of 8% for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006. The increase in comparable store sales was due to a 6% increase in the number of customer transactions and a 2% increase in the average value per transaction. Management believes increased traffic in Company-operated retail stores continues to be driven by sustained popularity of core products, new product innovation, and a high level of customer satisfaction.
The Company derived the remaining 15% of total net revenues from its specialty operations. Specialty revenues, which include licensing revenues and foodservice and other revenues, increased 26% to $895 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from $711 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005.

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Licensing revenues, which are derived from retail store licensing arrangements, grocery, warehouse club, and certain other branded-product licensing operations, increased 30% to $638 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from $489 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily attributable to higher product sales and royalty revenues from the opening of 1,158 new licensed retail stores in the last 12 months and growth in the licensed grocery and warehouse club business. Foodservice and other revenues increased 16% to $257 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from $222 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily attributable to growth in the U.S. foodservice business.
Cost of sales including occupancy costs decreased to 40.5% of total net revenues for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from 40.9% for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005, primarily due to fixed rent costs in fiscal 2006 being distributed over an expanded revenue base, as well as increased occupancy costs in fiscal 2005 resulting from intensified store maintenance activities. These favorable items, together with certain other improvements including lower dairy costs, offset higher green coffee costs for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006.
Store operating expenses as a percentage of Company-operated retail revenues increased to 40.4% for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to 40.0% for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. Increases due to higher payroll-related expenditures from higher provisions for incentive compensation based on the Company’s strong operating results in fiscal 2006 and the recognition of stock-based compensation expense were partially offset by leverage gained from increased sales and lower marketing expenses.
Other operating expenses (expenses associated with the Company’s specialty operations) increased to 21.5% of total specialty revenues for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to 19.6% in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily due to the recognition of stock-based compensation expense, as well as higher marketing and advertising costs related to Starbucks ready-to-drink coffee beverages in Japan, Taiwan and Korea.
Depreciation and amortization expenses increased to $284 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $252 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily due to the opening of 955 new Company-operated retail stores in the last 12 months. As a percentage of total net revenues, depreciation and amortization expenses decreased to 4.9% for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from 5.3% for the corresponding 39-week period of fiscal 2005.
General and administrative expenses increased to $358 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $256 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily due to higher payroll-related expenditures from stock-based compensation, additional employees to support continued global growth and higher provisions for incentive compensation in fiscal 2006 based on the Company’s strong operating results. As a percentage of total net revenues, general and administrative expenses increased to 6.2% for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006 from 5.4% for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005.
Income from equity investees increased to $65 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $47 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily due to volume-driven results for The North American Coffee Partnership, which produces bottled Frappuccino® and Starbucks DoubleShot® coffee drinks, and improved results from international investees, particularly in Japan.
Operating income increased 19% to $696 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $584 million for the corresponding 39-week period of fiscal 2005. Operating margin decreased to 12.0% of total net revenues for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to 12.4% for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005, due to the recognition of stock-based compensation expense.
Interest and other income decreased to $8.4 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $12.4 million in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005, primarily due to interest expense recognized on borrowings under the Company’s revolving credit facility, which was entered into in August of 2005.
Income taxes for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006 resulted in an effective tax rate of 36.6%, compared to 37.8% in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The decline in the effective tax rate was primarily due to the settlement in the third quarter of fiscal 2006 of a multi-year income tax audit in a foreign jurisdiction for which the Company had established a contingent liability. The Company currently estimates that its effective tax rate for the fourth quarter of fiscal 2006 will approximate 38%.

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SEGMENT RESULTS
Segment information is prepared on the basis that the Company’s management reviews financial information for operational decision-making purposes. The tables below present operating segment results net of intersegment eliminations for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006 and July 3, 2005 (in thousands):
                                         
    39 Weeks Ended   39 Weeks Ended
    July 2,   July 3,   %   July 2,   July 3,
    2006   2005   Change   2006   2005
                            As a % of U.S.
United States                           total net revenues
Net revenues:
                                       
Company-operated retail
  $ 4,072,880     $ 3,375,922       20.6 %     84.9 %     85.4 %
Specialty:
                                       
Licensing
    487,738       374,626       30.2 %     10.2 %     9.5 %
Foodservice and other
    235,936       204,083       15.6 %     4.9 %     5.1 %
                 
Total specialty
    723,674       578,709       25.0 %     15.1 %     14.6 %
                 
Total net revenues
    4,796,554       3,954,631       21.3 %     100.0 %     100.0 %
 
                                       
Cost of sales including occupancy costs
    1,871,313       1,542,157               39.0 %     39.0 %
Store operating expenses
    1,665,664       1,365,920               40.9 %(1)     40.5 %(1)
Other operating expenses
    152,169       116,737               21.0 %(2)     20.2 %(2)
Depreciation and amortization expenses
    208,255       185,181               4.3 %     4.7 %
General and administrative expenses
    68,161       65,239               1.4 %     1.6 %
 
                                       
Income from equity investees
    37,938       27,377               0.8 %     0.7 %
                 
Operating income
  $ 868,930     $ 706,774       22.9 %     18.1 %     17.9 %
                 
 
                            As a % of International
International                           total net revenues
Net revenues:
                                       
Company-operated retail
  $ 815,924     $ 623,291       30.9 %     82.7 %     82.5 %
Specialty:
                                       
Licensing
    150,033       114,209       31.4 %     15.2 %     15.1 %
Foodservice and other
    21,076       17,928       17.6 %     2.1 %     2.4 %
                 
Total specialty
    171,109       132,137       29.5 %     17.3 %     17.5 %
                 
Total net revenues
    987,033       755,428       30.7 %     100.0 %     100.0 %
 
                                       
Cost of sales including occupancy costs
    472,487       384,169               47.9 %     50.9 %
Store operating expenses
    308,377       234,038               37.8 % (1)     37.5 % (1)
Other operating expenses
    40,105       22,355               23.4 %(2)     16.9 %(2)
Depreciation and amortization expenses
    49,843       41,232               5.0 %     5.5 %
General and administrative expenses
    56,635       37,447               5.7 %     5.0 %
 
                                       
Income from equity investees
    27,433       19,802               2.8 %     2.6 %
                 
Operating income
  $ 87,019     $ 55,989       55.4 %     8.8 %     7.4 %
                 
 
                            As a % of
Unallocated Corporate                           total net revenues
Depreciation and amortization expenses
  $ 26,237     $ 25,281               0.5 %     0.5 %
General and administrative expenses
    233,398       153,479               4.0 %     3.3 %
                 
Operating loss
  $ (259,635 )   $ (178,760 )             (4.5 )%     (3.8 )%
                 
 
(1)   Shown as a percentage of related Company-operated retail revenues.
 
(2)   Shown as a percentage of related total specialty revenues.

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United States
United States total net revenues increased 21% to $4.8 billion for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $4.0 billion for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005.
United States Company-operated retail revenues increased 21% to $4.1 billion for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $3.4 billion for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005, primarily due to the opening of 727 new Company-operated retail stores in the last 12 months and comparable store sales growth of 7% for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006. The increase in comparable store sales was due to a 6% increase in the number of customer transactions and a 1% increase in the average value per transaction.
Total United States specialty revenues increased 25% to $724 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $579 million in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. United States licensing revenues increased 30% to $488 million, compared to $375 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily due to higher product sales and royalty revenues as a result of opening 730 new licensed retail stores in the last 12 months and growth in the licensed grocery and warehouse club business. United States foodservice and other revenues increased 16% to $236 million from $204 million in fiscal 2005, due to growth in new and existing foodservice accounts.
United States operating income increased by 23% to $869 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from $707 million for the same period in fiscal 2005. Operating margin increased to 18.1% of related revenues from 17.9% in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005, primarily due to leverage gained from fixed costs, including depreciation and general and administrative expenses, distributed over an expanded revenue base. These improvements were offset in part by higher store operating and other operating expenses, due primarily to the recognition of stock-based compensation expense.
International
International total net revenues increased 31% to $987 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $755 million for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005.
International Company-operated retail revenues increased 31% to $816 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $623 million for the corresponding period for fiscal 2005, primarily due to the opening of 228 new Company-operated retail stores in the last 12 months and comparable store sales growth of 8% for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006. The increase in comparable store sales resulted from a 5% increase in the number of customer transactions coupled with a 3% increase in the average value per transaction.
Total International specialty revenues increased 29% to $171 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $132 million in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily due to higher product sales and royalty revenues from opening 428 new licensed retail stores in the last 12 months and sales of ready-to-drink coffee beverages introduced in Japan, Taiwan and Korea in the fall of 2005.
International operating income increased 55% to $87 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, from $56 million in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. Operating margin increased to 8.8% of related revenues from 7.4% in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005, primarily due to lower cost of sales including occupancy costs due to leverage gained from fixed costs distributed over an expanded revenue base as well as lower dairy costs. These improvements were partially offset by higher marketing expenditures in support of the ready-to-drink coffee beverages in Japan, Taiwan and Korea and increased payroll-related expenditures to support global expansion, as well as the recognition of stock-based compensation expense.
Unallocated Corporate
Unallocated corporate expenses increased to $260 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, compared to $179 million in the corresponding period of fiscal 2005. The increase was primarily due to higher payroll-related expenses from stock-based compensation, additional employees to support continued global growth and higher provisions for incentive compensation in fiscal 2006 based on the Company’s strong operating results. Total unallocated corporate expenses as a percentage of total net revenues increased to 4.5% for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006 compared to 3.8% for the corresponding period of fiscal 2005.

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Liquidity and Capital Resources
Components of the Company’s most liquid assets are as follows (in thousands):
                 
    July 2,     October 2,  
    2006     2005  
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 215,739     $ 173,809  
Short-term investments — available-for-sale securities
    175,851       95,379  
Short-term investments — trading securities
    50,389       37,848  
Long-term investments — available-for-sale securities
    24,045       60,475  
 
           
Total cash, cash equivalents and liquid investments
  $ 466,024     $ 367,511  
 
           
The Company manages its cash, cash equivalents and liquid investments in order to internally fund operating needs. The $99 million increase in total cash and cash equivalents and liquid investments from October 2, 2005 to July 2, 2006, was primarily due to strong operating cash flows.
The Company intends to use its cash and liquid investments, including any borrowings under its $500 million revolving credit facility entered into in August 2005, to invest in its core businesses and other new business opportunities related to its core businesses. The Company may use its available cash resources to make proportionate capital contributions to its equity method and cost method investees, as well as purchase larger ownership interests in selected equity method investees and licensed operations, particularly in international markets. Depending on market conditions, Starbucks may repurchase shares of its common stock under its authorized share repurchase program. Management believes that strong cash flow generated from operations, existing cash and liquid investments, as well as borrowing capacity under the revolving credit facility, should be sufficient to finance capital requirements for its core businesses for the foreseeable future. Significant new joint ventures, acquisitions, share repurchases and/or other new business opportunities may require additional outside funding.
Other than normal operating expenses, cash requirements for the remainder of fiscal 2006 are expected to consist primarily of capital expenditures for new Company-operated retail stores and the remodeling and refurbishment of existing Company-operated retail stores; as well as potential increased investments in International licensees and for additional share repurchases, if any. Management expects capital expenditures for fiscal 2006 to be approximately $800 million, primarily driven by the acceleration in new store development. The capital expenditures also include costs related to expanding its corporate headquarters and enhancing its production capacity and information systems to support its future growth. Capital expenditures are expected to be in the range of $950 million to $1.0 billion in fiscal 2007, driven by increasing new store development.
Cash provided by operating activities totaled $936 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006. Net earnings provided $447 million and non-cash depreciation and amortization expenses further increased operating activities by $303 million. In addition, an increase in accrued taxes payable due to the timing of payments provided $85 million.
Cash used by investing activities for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, totaled $678 million. Net capital additions to property, plant and equipment used $522 million, primarily from opening 688 new Company-operated retail stores for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, and remodeling certain existing stores. Gross capital additions for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006 were $549 million and were offset by impairment provisions and foreign currency translation adjustments totaling $27 million. During the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, the Company used $91 million for acquisitions, net of cash acquired. In addition, the net activity in the Company’s portfolio of available-for-sale securities used $45 million for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006.
Cash used by financing activities for the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, totaled $220 million. Cash used to repurchase shares of the Company’s common stock totaled $368 million. This amount includes the effect of the net change in unsettled trades from October 2, 2005. Share repurchases, up to the limit authorized by the Board of Directors, are at the discretion of management and depend on market conditions, capital requirements and other factors. The total remaining amount of shares authorized for repurchase as of July 2, 2006 was 11.0 million. In its Form 8-K filed on August 2, 2006, Starbucks announced that its Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to 25 million shares. Approximately 25 million shares remained available for repurchase as of August 9, 2006.
The Company made net repayments under its credit facility of $77 million during the 39 weeks ended July 2, 2006, which consisted of additional gross borrowings of $378 million offset by gross principal repayments of $455 million. Management expects to increase the Company’s borrowing capacity under its credit facility from $500 million up to $1.0 billion, as provided in the original credit facility, during the Company’s fiscal fourth quarter of 2006. As of August 9, 2006, a total of $410 million was outstanding under the Facility.
Partially offsetting cash used for share repurchases and net repayments of the revolving credit facility were $132 million of proceeds from the exercise of employee stock options and the sale of the Company’s common stock from employee stock purchase plans. As

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options granted are exercised, the Company will continue to receive proceeds and a tax deduction; however, the amounts and the timing cannot be predicted.
Store Data
The following table summarizes the Company’s retail store information:
                                                 
    Net stores opened during the period          
    13-week period   39-week period   Stores open as of
    July 2,   July 3,   July 2,   July 3,   July 2,   July 3,
    2006   2005   2006   2005   2006   2005
United States:
                                               
Company-operated stores
    208       141       526       373       5,393       4,666  
Licensed stores
    187       142       517       383       2,952       2,222  
 
                                               
 
    395       283       1,043       756       8,345       6,888  
 
                                               
International:
                                               
Company-operated stores (1)
    47       33       162       106       1,357       1,129  
Licensed stores (1)
    117       94       338       240       2,082       1,654  
 
                                               
 
    164       127       500       346       3,439       2,783  
 
                                               
 
Total
    559       410       1,543       1,102       11,784       9,671  
 
                                               
 
(1)   International store data has been adjusted for the 100% acquisition of the Hawaii and Puerto Rico operations by reclassifying historical information from Licensed stores to Company-operated stores.
Starbucks plans to open at least 2,000 new stores on a global basis in fiscal 2006, an increase of 200 new stores from the Company’s previous target of 1,800. In the United States, Starbucks plans to open approximately 750 Company-operated locations and 650 licensed locations. In International markets, Starbucks plans to open approximately 200 Company-operated stores and 400 licensed stores.
Contractual Obligations
There have been no material changes during the period covered by this report, outside of the ordinary course of the Company’s business, to the contractual obligations specified in the table of contractual obligations included in the section “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included in the Company’s Fiscal 2005 Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangement
The Company has unconditionally guaranteed the repayment of certain Japanese yen-denominated bank loans and related interest and fees of an unconsolidated equity investee, Starbucks Coffee Japan, Ltd. The guarantees continue until the loans, including accrued interest and fees, have been paid in full, with the final loan amount due in 2014. The maximum amount is limited to the sum of unpaid principal and interest amounts, as well as other related expenses. These amounts will vary based on fluctuations in the yen foreign exchange rate. As of July 2, 2006, the maximum amount of the guarantees was approximately $6.8 million. Since there has been no modification of these loan guarantees subsequent to the Company’s adoption of FASB Interpretation No. 45, “Guarantor’s Accounting and Disclosure Requirements for Guarantees, Including Indebtedness of Others,” Starbucks has applied the disclosure provisions only and has not recorded the guarantee on its consolidated balance sheet.
Commodity Prices, Availability and General Risk Conditions
The Company manages its exposure to various risks within the consolidated financial statements according to an umbrella risk management policy. Under this policy, market-based risks, including commodity costs and foreign currency exchange rates, are quantified and evaluated for potential mitigation strategies, such as entering into hedging transactions. Additionally, this policy restricts, among other things, the amount of market-based risk the Company will tolerate before implementing approved hedging strategies and prohibits speculative trading activity.
The Company purchases significant amounts of coffee and dairy products to support the needs of its Company-operated retail stores. The price and availability of these commodities directly impacts the Company’s results of operations and can be expected to impact its future results of operations. For additional details see “Product Supply” in Item 1, as well as “Risk Factors” in Item 1A of the Company’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended October 2, 2005.

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Seasonality and Quarterly Results
The Company’s business is subject to seasonal fluctuations. Historically, significant portions of the Company’s net revenues and profits were, and may continue to be realized during the first quarter of the Company’s fiscal year, which includes the December holiday season. In addition, quarterly results are affected by the timing of the opening of new stores, and the Company’s rapid growth may conceal the impact of other seasonal influences. Because of the seasonality of the Company’s business, results for any quarter are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be achieved for the full fiscal year.
Critical Accounting Policies
Critical accounting policies are those that management believes are both most important to the portrayal of the Company’s financial conditions and results, and require management’s most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain. Judgments and uncertainties affecting the application of those policies may result in materially different amounts being reported under different conditions or using different assumptions.
As discussed in Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” section of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended October 2, 2005, Starbucks considers its policies on impairment of long-lived assets and accounting for self insurance reserves to be the most critical in understanding the judgments that are involved in preparing its consolidated financial statements. With the adoption of SFAS 123R at the beginning of the Company’s first fiscal quarter of 2006, Starbucks has added “Stock-Based Compensation” as a critical accounting policy.
Stock-Based Compensation
Starbucks accounts for stock-based compensation in accordance with the fair value recognition provisions of SFAS 123R. The Company uses the Black-Scholes-Merton option-pricing model which requires the input of highly subjective assumptions. These assumptions include estimating the length of time employees will retain their stock options before exercising them (“expected term”), the estimated volatility of the Company’s common stock price over the expected term and the number of options that will ultimately not complete their vesting requirements (“forfeitures”). Changes in the subjective assumptions can materially affect the estimate of fair value of stock-based compensation and consequently, the related amount recognized on the consolidated statements of earnings.
Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements
In July 2006, the FASB issued Interpretation No. 48 (“FIN 48”), “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes, an interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109,” which seeks to reduce the diversity in practice associated with the accounting and reporting for uncertainty in income tax positions. This Interpretation prescribes a comprehensive model for the financial statement recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken in income tax returns. FIN 48 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2006 and the Company will adopt the new requirements in its fiscal first quarter of 2008. The cumulative effects, if any, of adopting FIN 48 will be recorded as an adjustment to retained earnings as of the beginning of the period of adoption. The Company has not yet determined the impact, if any, of adopting FIN 48 on its consolidated financial statements.
In November 2005, the FASB issued Staff Position No. FAS 123(R)-3, “Transition Election Related to Accounting for the Tax Effects of Share-Based Payment Awards” (“FSP 123R-3”). The Company has elected to adopt the alternative transition method provided in FSP 123R-3 for calculating the tax effects of stock-based compensation under SFAS 123R. The alternative transition method includes simplified methods to establish the beginning balance of the additional paid-in-capital pool (“APIC pool”) related to the tax effects of stock-based compensation, and for determining the subsequent impact on the APIC pool and consolidated statements of cash flows of the tax effects of stock-based compensation awards that are outstanding upon adoption of SFAS 123R.
In March 2005, the FASB issued Interpretation No. 47, “Accounting for Conditional Asset Retirement Obligations, an interpretation of FASB Statement No. 143” (“FIN 47”). FIN 47 requires the recognition of a liability for the fair value of a legally-required conditional asset retirement obligation when incurred, if the liability’s fair value can be reasonably estimated. FIN 47 also clarifies when an entity would have sufficient information to reasonably estimate the fair value of an asset retirement obligation. FIN 47 is effective for fiscal years ending after December 15, 2005, and Starbucks will adopt the new requirements at the end of its fiscal fourth quarter of 2006. The Company is in the process of determining the impact of adoption on its consolidated financial statements and currently estimates the cumulative impact upon adoption to total $0.05 per diluted share or less.
In December 2004, the FASB issued Staff Position No. FAS 109-2, “Accounting and Disclosure Guidance for the Foreign Earnings Repatriation Provision within the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004” (“FSP 109-2”). The American Jobs Creation Act allows a special one-time dividends received deduction on the repatriation of certain foreign earnings to a U.S. taxpayer (“repatriation provision”), provided certain criteria are met. The law allows the Company to make an election to repatriate earnings through fiscal

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2006. FSP 109-2 provides accounting and disclosure guidance for the repatriation provision. Although FSP 109-2 was effective upon its issuance, it allows companies additional time beyond the enactment date to evaluate the effects of the provision on its plan for investment or repatriation of unremitted foreign earnings. During the Company’s fiscal third quarter of 2006, Starbucks completed its evaluation and decided not to elect repatriation of earnings under this provision.
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Foreign Currency Exchange Risk
As of July 2, 2006, the Company had forward foreign exchange contracts that qualify as cash flow hedges under SFAS No. 133, “Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities,” to hedge a portion of anticipated international revenue and product purchases. In addition, Starbucks had forward foreign exchange contracts that qualify as hedges of its net investment in Starbucks Japan, as well as the Company’s net investments in its Canadian and United Kingdom subsidiaries. These contracts expire within 36 months.
Based on the foreign exchange contracts outstanding as of July 2, 2006, a 10% devaluation of the U.S. dollar as compared to the level of foreign exchange rates for currencies under contract as of July 2, 2006, would result in a reduced fair value of these derivative financial instruments of approximately $46 million, of which $24 million may reduce the Company’s future net earnings. Conversely, a 10% appreciation of the U.S. dollar would result in an increase in the fair value of these instruments of approximately $40 million, of which $22 million may increase the Company’s future net earnings. Consistent with the nature of the economic hedges provided by these foreign exchange contracts, increases or decreases in the fair value would be mostly offset by corresponding decreases or increases in the dollar value of the Company’s foreign investment, future foreign currency royalty fee payments and product purchases that would occur within the hedging period.
There has been no material change in the equity security price risk or interest rate risk discussed in Item 7A of the Company’s Fiscal 2005 Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Item 4. Controls and Procedures
The Company maintains disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that material information required to be disclosed in the Company’s periodic reports filed or submitted under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms.
During the quarter the Company carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of the Company’s management, including the chief executive officer and the chief financial officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of the disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act. Based upon that evaluation, the Company’s chief executive officer and chief financial officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective, as of the end of the period covered by this report (July 2, 2006).
During the third quarter of fiscal 2006, there were no changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) or 15d-15(f) of the Exchange Act) that materially affected or are reasonably likely to materially affect internal control over financial reporting.
The certifications required by Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 are filed as exhibits 31.1 and 31.2, respectively, to this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

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PART II — OTHER INFORMATION
Item 1. Legal Proceedings
See discussion of Legal Proceedings in Note 11 to the consolidated financial statements included in Item 1 of this report.
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
The following table provides information regarding repurchases by the Company of its common stock during the 13-week period ended July 2, 2006:
ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
                                 
                    Total Number   Maximum
                    of Shares   Number of
                    Purchased as   Shares that May
    Total   Average   Part of Publicly   Yet Be
    Number of   Price   Announced   Purchased
    Shares   Paid per   Plans or   Under the Plans
Period (1)   Purchased   Share   Programs(2)   or Programs(2)
Apr 3, 2006 — Apr 30, 2006
                      15,950,182  
May 1, 2006 — May 28, 2006
                      15,950,182  
May 29, 2006 — July 2, 2006
    4,908,028     $ 35.84       4,908,028       11,042,154  
 
                               
Total
    4,908,028               4,908,028          
 
                               
 
(1)   Monthly information is presented by reference to the Company’s fiscal months during the third quarter of fiscal 2006.
 
(2)   The Company’s share repurchase program is conducted under authorizations made from time to time by the Company’s Board of Directors. The shares reported in the table are covered by Board authorizations to repurchase shares of common stock, as follows: 20 million shares announced on May 5, 2005, and 10 million shares announced on September 22, 2005. Shares remaining for repurchase relate to both authorizations. On August 2, 2006, the Company announced that its Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to an additional 25 million shares. None of these authorizations has an expiration date.
Item 5. Other Information
The Company’s 2007 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (the “2007 Annual Meeting”) will be held on March 21, 2007. Shareholder proposals to be presented at the 2007 Annual Meeting must be received by the Company at its executive offices at 2401 Utah Avenue South, Seattle, Washington 98134, Attention: Corporate Secretary, on or prior to August 21, 2006.
Item 6. Exhibits
     (a) Exhibits:
                                                 
            Incorporated by Reference    
Exhibit                        
Number   Exhibit Description   Form   File No.   Date of First Filing   Exhibit Number   Filed Herewith
  31.1    
Certification of
                            X  
       
Principal Executive Officer Pursuant to Rule 13a-14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
                                       
       
 
                                       
  31.2    
Certification of
                            X  
       
Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to Rule 13a-14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
                                       
       
 
                                       
  32.1    
Certification of
                            X  
       
Principal Executive Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
                                       
       
 
                                       
  32.2    
Certification of
                            X  
       
Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
                                       

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SIGNATURES
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.
         
  STARBUCKS CORPORATION
 
 
August 11, 2006  By:   /s/ Michael Casey    
    Michael Casey   
    executive vice president, chief financial officer and chief administrative officer   
 
    Signing on behalf of the registrant and as principal financial officer   
     
     
     

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INDEX TO EXHIBITS
                                                 
            Incorporated by Reference    
Exhibit                        
Number   Exhibit Description   Form   File No.   Date of First Filing   Exhibit Number   Filed Herewith
  31.1    
Certification of
                            X  
       
Principal Executive Officer Pursuant to Rule 13a-14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
                                       
       
 
                                       
  31.2    
Certification of
                            X  
       
Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to Rule 13a-14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
                                       
       
 
                                       
  32.1    
Certification of
                            X  
       
Principal Executive Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
                                       
       
 
                                       
  32.2    
Certification of
                            X  
       
Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
                                       

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