News about <![CDATA[Games]]> News about en-us <![CDATA[App.io Turns iOS Apps Into Playable Mobile Ads]]>  App.io, a startup offering tools that allow iOS applications to run in the browser for testing or demo purposes, has now taken the next logical step: it’s bringing its technology the world of mobile advertising. With the company’s newly launched mobile ad product, developers can create ad units that are basically functional copies of their mobile app or game that consumers can play… Read More
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<![CDATA[Medikidz Power up with Media Design School in New Zealand]]> <![CDATA[Kiwi kids bring ANZAC history to life in Minecraft]]> <![CDATA[Auction Wars: Storage King update bids to be the best game on the App Store!]]> <![CDATA[Exeo Entertainment, Inc. Provides for New Class of Stock]]> <![CDATA[Barbed Arrow Inc. to release Grand Arena of Serndall with accommodations for red/green colorblind players]]> <![CDATA[Barbed Arrow, Inc. Assembles International Development Team for Grand Arena of Serndall]]> <![CDATA[reShoot 1.6 Pushes The iOS Video Editing Envelope]]> <![CDATA[Soft Floor UK Goes Into The Wild With Unique New Range Of Jungle and Jurassic Play Mats]]> <![CDATA[New Online Game Lets Players Buy and Sell Celebrities for Real Money]]> <![CDATA[Auction Wars: Storage King, the no.1 auction game on iOS is now even better!]]> <![CDATA[Watch Out, Investors: 'Candy Crush' IPO May Rot Your Teeth]]> DailyFinance.com: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images "Candy Crush Saga" fans know that it's not always easy to find the right match, but that's not stopping its developer King Digital Entertainment from hoping that it's the right match for investors. The... Read more]]> <![CDATA[MathNook Announces New Co-Partnership with SymbalooEDU]]> <![CDATA[Horror, Fantasy Rule NAVGTR Awards]]> <![CDATA[Yes, Flappy Bird Will Return To The App Store]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[New Social Media Concept Prepares to Go Live]]> <![CDATA[Pebble Gets Its Tamagotchi With New Hatchi Game Launch]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[Moks Nix Live: Tv Game Show Joins Pitch War In France]]> <![CDATA[Auction Wars: Storage King is now available on iPhone, iPad & iPod touch!]]> <![CDATA[The Geekie Awards Receive Over One Billion Media Impressions – 2014 Submissions Open to Creators Worldwide]]> <![CDATA[DreamQuest Games Answers Obama’s Call for STEM via Unique Video Game Design Summer Camp]]> <![CDATA[Sochi 2014: My Olympic story]]> <![CDATA[Baby Shark is a new twist on Flappy Bird]]> <![CDATA[Apple Design Award Winner Tapity Releases A “Flappy Bird” Clone]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[Debut Fantasy Novel A Sudden Hit]]> <![CDATA[British Gaming Chair Awarded German Seal Of Approval]]> <![CDATA[Real-Time Mobile Analytics Platform Amplitude Takes On Flurry & Mixpanel]]> Amplitude, a Y Combinator-backed mobile analytics service aiming to take on the likes of Flurry and Mixpanel by offering advanced features at more competitive prices, is officially making its public debut today ahead of YC's Demo Day. And the company has actually gone through this process before, as it turns out - it's the same team from the text-by-voice Android app Sonalight, which was in the YC Winter 2012 cohort.]]> <![CDATA[The MIT Press Publishes A Composer’s Guide to Game Music]]> <![CDATA[Candy Crush Saga company King files for IPO, hopes to raise $500M]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Candy Crush Maker King Files For U.S. IPO]]> The studio behind addictive matching puzzle game Candy Crush has begun the process of filing for its U.S. IPO with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Re/Code reports. The UK company will look to begin trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the ‘KING’ ticker symbol should everything go according to plan. Last year, Candy Crush was the top earning title on any mobile platform according to mobile app analytics firm Distimo, since it occupied a top spot on both iOS and Android all year. Candy Crush was released halfway through 2012, but it has managed to retain much of its momentum since then, which is impressive in the fickle casual games market. As Re/Code points out, however, King’s revenue declined between the third and fourth quarters of 2013, so it may need its next hit to come along sooner rather than later. Currently, however, King’s games bring in 1.2 billion daily plays from 128 million daily active users according to the most recent numbers from the company, of which 73 percent come from mobile devices. Candy Crush has definitely been a defining moment for the company, but it has been in the casual games business since 2003, and in its IPO King cites its massive built-in player network (which includes 324 monthly active users in total) as a key competitive advantage. Still, it’s hard to deny that Candy Crush has been the overwhelmingly dominant source of growth for King. In its IPO documents, the company reveals that it apparently grew from a profit loss of $1 million in the first quarter of 2012, to a profit gain of $269 million in the fourth quarter of 2013. King admits in its list of potential risk factors that “a small number of games currently generate a substantial majority of our revenue,” and that even developing new games could just recirculate its existing audience instead of growing a new one, but also says it plans to strengthen its new game and intellectual property development pipeline, and expand its existing titles to new platform and geographies to retain its competitive edge.]]> <![CDATA[Apple & Google Begin Rejecting Games With “Flappy” In The Title]]> The Flappy Bird phenomenon shows no signs of slowing down, despite the fact that the original title was yanked out of the App Store by creator Dong Nguyen, whose newfound fame apparently became too overwhelming. But though “Flappy Bird” itself may be gone, the App Store’s top charts today are filled with clones that mimic the addicting, frustrating game that became this year’s viral hit. However, that may not be the case for long. Word has it that both Apple and Google are now rejecting games that have the word “flappy” in their title. According to Vancouver-based game designer Ken Carpenter of Mind Juice Media, Apple rejected an app of his called “Flappy Dragon” from the App Store. Apple told him “we found your app name attempts to leverage a popular app,” says Carpenter. Clearly, the only app “Flappy Dragon” would be leveraging is “Flappy Bird” – which, to be clear, is technically no longer present in the App Store. This is just not my fucking week: Rejected. “We found your app name attempts to leverage a popular app.” Which app? FB doesn’t exist!?!?! — Ken Carpenter (@MindJuiceMedia) February 15, 2014 Carpenter isn’t the only game developer affected by the policy shift, it seems. A tweet from Kuyi Mobile indicates that a small handful of developers attempting to launch their own “Flappy” clones have also been rejected for the same reason: @madgarden @wtrebella @kylnew @MindJuiceMedia I think you should resubmit. Besides Ken, I know 3 other devs who just got rejected. :S — Kuyi Mobile (@kuyimobile) February 15, 2014 This is somewhat odd, given that there are already several similarly named games on the market, including “Flappy Bee,” “Flappy Plane,” “Flappy Super Hero,” “Flappy Flyer,” and even “Flappy Bird Flyer,” Carpenter points out. Plus, there are clones that don’t include “Flappy” in the title, like “Splashy Fish” and “Ironpants” – #1 and #2 in the App Store’s top charts, at present. Meanwhile, others that include “Flappy,” but don’t lead with it, are also doing well: spot #3 is “City Bird – Flappy Flyer” and #7 is “Fly Birdie – Flappy Bird Flyer.” In other words, the App Store’s top charts are being absolutely decimated by “Flappy Bird” clones. And users are still eating them up en masse. But perhaps enough is enough? Apple may not want the App Store to be overrun with these spinoffs, especially because their proliferation is likely causing consumer confusion.]]> <![CDATA[Haypi Monster: The Lost Tower 1.3: New Critters Join the Team]]> <![CDATA[If Flappy Bird And Snapchat Spawned A Demon Love Child, It Would Be Amazing Cupid]]> Imagine that you are a teenager and the most annoying person in your class has a massive crush on you. No matter what you do, your would-be paramour keeps following you around like a lovesick puppy. What do you do? Well, if you have a particularly sadistic streak, you send your object of disaffection a message through Amazing Cupid. The twist? In order to see your note, he or she has to earn a certain number of points within a time limit, set by you, by playing a Flappy Bird clone. Otherwise the message disappears forever. Amazing Cupid is currently available only in the Google Play store, but the iOS build has already been submitted to the App Store and its developer, Indonesia-based startup TouchTen, hopes it will be available for download by Valentine’s Day. There are already tons of Flappy Bird knockoffs (in fact, one even took its #1 spot on the iOS charts after developer Dong Nguyen pulled the game out of the App Store) out there. But TouchTen CEO Anton Soeharyo is careful to point out that he got permission from Nguyen to copy Flappy Bird’s annoyingly addictive game mechanic before releasing Amazing Cupid, which Nguyen confirmed to me by email. Soeharyo also says that TouchTen has not monetized Amazing Cupid and the only ads inside the app are for the studio’s other games. Instead, he made Amazing Cupid to test out the messaging feature. If it proves successful, Soeharyo plans to insert it into other TouchTen releases as the Jakarta-based studio, which is backed by CyberAgent Ventures, builds its mobile gaming platform. Instead of a flappy bird, the game features a blue-haired cupid. Your goal is to keep him from crashing into a never-ending series of Doric columns. If you fail, Amazing Cupid treats you to tidbits of verbal abuse like “No wonder you’re alone.” or “Why am I grumpy? You are my only friend.” If you succeed, you eventually gain access to your secret message. Amazing Cupid also has a game-only mode, in case you really don’t have any friends. To make the game more difficult (and addicting), TouchTen added a few features that weren’t in Flappy Bird. For example, there are three levels: normal, hard, and “impossibro.” I told Soeharyo that Amazing Cupid is funny but evil. “That’s kind of the idea,” he said. Soeharyo first thought about self-destructing secret messages after realizing that]]> <![CDATA[Developer Behind “Flappy Bird,” The Impossible Game Blowing Up The App Store, Says He Just Got Lucky]]> Flappy Bird, a game you can barely play for more than a few seconds without throwing your phone across the room in frustration, is dominating the App Store and Google Play. In an App Store first, an indie game developer from Hanoi, Vietnam, Nguyen Ha Dong, has 3 apps in the top 10 rankings right now, which is not only odd because the publisher has seemingly come out of nowhere with these viral hits, but also because there’s no cross-promotion built into the games themselves. The other two titles, Super Ball Juggling (currently #2) and Shuriken Block (#6) instead seem to be benefitting solely from the word-of-mouth success of #1 free app, Flappy Bird itself. As for the Flappy Bird game, its deceptively simple appearance with graphics that harken back to the era of 8-bit gaming, is actually one of the hardest games you’ll ever play. And yet the gameplay involves nothing more than tapping your screen to keep a flying bird from running into green pipes that look like they’ve been snatched out of Super Mario Bros. Yes, that’s the extent of it. There’s no other challenge or story. But good luck, gamers, because if you can get a score in the double digits, you’re some kind of god here. In fact, it’s a game that’s so irritatingly impossible, and yet somehow so addictive, that it seems like it’s been designed more so to have its players run to tell their friends about it, rather than master the skill set it requires. (Though some, of course, have done that too.) After the hundredth time you play it, having only a score of, say, five, it’s like you’re unable to keep quiet about the darned thing. A simple built-in “Rate” button, one of only a few in the game besides “Start,” “Score,” and a pause button which you’ll probably die if you try to use, allows you to share your frustrations on the app store, while its “Share” counterpart helpfully lets you tell your friends on Facebook, Twitter, SMS or email. “This sucks! You have to try it,” is how those invites generally read. The game is not for everyone, to be clear. It’s kind of an awful little thing that you can even play in spare chunks of time when you only have seconds (maybe not even minutes!) to kill in between some other activity. As you quickly die]]> <![CDATA[Imaginism Studios On Building Niko And The Sword Of Light, Reimagining Digital Narrative]]> Back in February 2013, Toronto’s Imaginism Studios launched an ambitious crowdfunding campaign for a new type of app that combined full-scale animation and comic books for a novel, mobile device oriented kind of storytelling. Niko and the Sword of Light is the app that was built using the funds from the successful Kickstarter campaign, and it earned a featured spot on Apple’s App Store as well as strong global download numbers on iOS, Android and the Amazon Appstore. Imaginism’s Niko project was a bit of an experiment for the studio, since it generally does character design and animation work for external clients, which include Disney, Blizzard, Warner Brothers, Sony Pictures Animation, Dreamworks and many more. The Imaginism crew is currently working on character design for an upcoming blockbuster feature, and has already created some of the characters you’d likely recognize, including those from Disney’s live-action Alice In Wonderland adaptation. Niko has opened the door for Imaginism on a number of tie-ins and other opportunities for the young firm in terms of creating and growing its own intellectual properties – the meticulous, hand-drawn animation used in the creation of the original app clearly has a lot of appeal. Imaginism may soon get a chance to show off its animation skills to an even larger audience, as it has just entered into an agreement to option Niko to Amazon Studios for the creation of a series based on the character and world introduced in the app. Imaginism is a perfect example of what a small startup (consisting mostly of friends who went to school together and didn’t know what to do once they graduated) can do by satisfying an industry need that many don’t even know exists. The studio has made itself indispensable to some of the biggest creative brands in the world, and now they’re using that positioning, as well as innovations like crowfunding, to build the things they always wanted to for themselves, too. If you haven’t experienced Niko and the Sword of Light, it’s definitely worth checking out, especially now that the brand could be on its way to becoming the next big thing.]]> <![CDATA[Day One with the Xbox One: What Parents Need to Know]]> <![CDATA[Historic playing cards revived in new highly anticipated deck, the Origins]]> <![CDATA[Swiggle, An Innovative Mobile Game App, Now Available]]> <![CDATA[Avalon Lords Reveals New Factional Unit Lore and Artwork]]> <![CDATA[Friv Games 2014 – Frivminigames.com]]> <![CDATA[Nintendo to consider “little experiences” on iOS]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Kingdom of Pirates 1.4: a More Challenging and Fascinating Version]]> <![CDATA[Trivie Named Top Entertainment “Hot App” by Good Housekeeping Magazine]]> <![CDATA[Google’s Niantic Labs brings Ingress out of beta]]> ]]> <![CDATA[1Vice.ag in association with Mad Jack Sports Announces a College Football “Pick 20” Bowl Contest]]> <![CDATA[Japan now outspends US on apps, according to study]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Play-i Raises $1.4M From The Crowd For Toy Robots That Make Programming Kid-Friendly, Will Hit Stores Near You Next Summer]]> If we’re going to prepare future generations for an increasingly technical world (and workforce) ahead, then we need to teach them computer science and engineering. To some, that may sound like a no-brainer, but to the American educational system, where nine out of ten schools don’t offer programming courses, it not. Of course, to really get students engaged and inspire that lifelong love of computer science and technology — just as it is with learning a new language — education has to start early. And it has to be fun. Learning how to code takes time and is a difficult proposition for adults, so asking kids to sit down and write a line of code (let alone learn the laws of computer science) almost seems absurd. It’s this problem that led Vikas Gupta, the former head of consumer payments at Google, to create Play-i and a couple of kid-friendly, educational robots. Joined by co-founders Saurabh Gupta, who previously led the iPod software team at Apple, and Mikal Greaves, who led product design and manufacturing for electronics and toys at Frog Design, to make programming and engineering concepts accessible to kids, who’d rather be outside digging in the dirt. The team knew that whatever solution they designed would need to be something kids would want to play with, so they created Bo and Yana, two programmable, interactive robots that look and act a lot like toys. The team raised $1 million from Google Ventures, Madrona Venture Group and others last year to build the prototypes, and today, though it’s still tinkering with details, the learning system is nearly ready for lift-off. When it comes to market next year, kids will be able to play with Bo and Yana right out of the box, controlling them through Play-i’s companion app designed for the iPad. The app presents visual sequences of actions and simple commands on the iPad that kids can then perform — like clapping, waving their hand or shaking one of the robots — that compel the robots to perform certain actions. Young programmers can get three-wheeled Bo to scoot around the room, blink his light or play a xylophone, shake Yana to roar like a lion, or have them interact with each other. Through actionable storytelling, play and music, younguns start to learn the most basic concepts behind programming, like causation. The coolest idea behind the interactive learning system is]]> <![CDATA[NRMA Insurance Launch LOCK-A-DOOR Facebook Game]]> <![CDATA[Mozilla unveils holiday HTML5 game competition]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Fantastic Books Publishing now lead the field with their record breaking Science Fiction releases]]>