News about <![CDATA[Klout]]> News about en-us <![CDATA[Lithium Confirms That It Has Acquired Klout]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[Lithium To Acquire Social Influence Scoring Site Klout For $200M]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[Report: Lithium Technologies will acquire Klout for $200 million]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Lithium Technologies Reportedly Reaches Deal To Acquire Klout]]> according to a report in Recode. The deal is supposedly a mix of cash and stock "in the low nine figures" (namely, a little more than $100 million). Neither Lithium nor Klout responded immediately to requests for comment — I'll update this post if they do. ]]> <![CDATA[Klout Adds Content Sharing Recommendations To Improve Your Score]]> Think your Klout score's too low? Well, the social influence measurement startup is launching a revamped version of its website today that includes tools for improving your score. The main addition is a "create" section that shows a stream of content based on the topics that you're interested in and that the people who follow your social media accounts are interested in. The main way to increase your Klout score is to post content that people engage with, so with the stream is essentially recommendations for content to share. Klout can also handle scheduling each post and will provide analytics so you can see what is and isn't working.]]> <![CDATA[Klout Deepens Its Bing Integration By Placing ‘Snapshots' Alongside Your Search Results]]> Well, here's another reason to care about your Klout score (and, y'know, actually create an account on Klout) — the company, which aims to measure social media influence, is announcing a prominent new integration with Microsoft's search engine Bing. About a year ago, Klout took a strategic investment from Microsoft and said it was integrating with Bing, for example by incorporating Bing results into its Klout score calculations.]]> <![CDATA[Gnip Expands Its Partnership With Klout, Becoming The Exclusive Provider Of Klout Topics]]> Social data provider Gnip has expanded its agreement with Klout, so Gnip customers who already include Klout Scores in their customer service, sales, and engagement products can have access to more data. For one thing, those customers can now include Klout Topics in addition to Klout Scores. In other words, the end user won't be limited to seeing a single score reflecting social media influence, but also the specific topics that someone is influential about. That can be particularly important, for example, when figuring out how to prioritize customer service queries and fan outreach.]]> <![CDATA[How to find on-demand expertise using crowdsourcing]]> ]]> <![CDATA[American Airlines Invites Social Media's High Flyers Into Its Elite Lounge]]> DailyFinance.com: American Airlines Airline lounges have long been the exclusive province of the high rollers willing to spend hundreds of dollars for the privilege of waiting for their flights in comfort. But they'll soon be joined by another kind of elite traveler: ... Read more]]> <![CDATA[Klout Gets Into The Q&A Business By Launching Klout Experts (With Help From Bing)]]> So what does a high Klout score actually get you? The infleunce-measuring startup already offers prizes through its Klout Perks program, and there are bragging rights, too (unless your friends think you're a loser for caring about your Klout score). Now Klout is also asking users who are influential on a given topic to answer short, factual, through the new Klout Experts program. It sounds like the program won't be rolled out to every user today, but when it is, you might Klout and be prompted to answer a question like "What is the best way to care for tulips?" or "What is the best place to take your date in the city?" You'll have 300 characters with which to offer your answer. (Why 300? Co-founder and CEO Joe Fernandez said 140 characters isn't always enough, but he wanted to keep the answers direct and to-the-point.)]]> <![CDATA[Klout Users Can Now Add Bing To Their Account And Include Instagram In Their Score]]> Klout, the service for measuring online influence, is boosting its integration with both Bing and Instagram today. On the Bing side, the news follows last fall's announcement of a strategic investment from and partnership with Microsoft. That announcement included the unveiling of a feature in Bing that would show Klout scores for select people. (And Bing continues to surface more data on that front.)]]> <![CDATA[Klout aims for new targets with launch of Klout for business]]>


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<![CDATA[Endorsements, LinkedIn’s Answer To Klout, Passes 1B Recommendations And Builds Up A New Data Set]]> Endorsements, a lightweight way for people on LinkedIn to recommend each other's skills, has picked up some significant traction in its first five months of life. Today, LinkedIn is announcing that Endorsements has passed the 1 billion milestone -- with 58 million members getting recognition on their profiles for different areas of expertise, according to a blog post from Peter Rusev. The marker is a sign that, were LinkedIn so inclined, it could likely give sites likes Klout, which measure influencer status, a run for their money. ]]> <![CDATA[Sumpto Wants To Be The Klout For College Students]]> Like a growing number of students, Ben Kosinski attended multiple universities over the course of his collegiate career. Although these schools differed wildly in culture and the makeup of their student bodies, the one thing that seems to remain true at any school, he says, is the level of influence online social identities have come to play in the daily life of college students. Yet, in spite of this, the world's biggest brands still struggle to reach college students -- the most coveted demographic -- instead, throwing money at the problem through ineffective advertising methods. ]]> <![CDATA[Social media rankings: perceptive or pointless?]]>


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<![CDATA[Klout Updates iPhone App With Passbook Integration, Wants You To “Show Off” With Klout Card]]> Online social influence is something that can really rub people the wrong way. Klout obviously believes in it wholeheartedly; others, not so much. Now, in a move that's sure to generate its fair share of criticism, Klout has updated its iPhone app with Passbook support, allowing users to create their own "Klout Card," which lives in Passbook and can help users "show off [their] influence."]]> <![CDATA[Klout CEO Joe Fernandez Responds To Criticism, Talks Job Descriptions That Include Score “Requirements” [TCTV]]]> Over the weekend, I wrote a post about Salesforce telling potential job applicants that one of its "desired skills" was having a Klout score of 35 or more. Needless to say, I found this to be a bit unsettling, as I instantly imagined other companies forcing this into their own job applications. ]]> <![CDATA[Klout Would Like Potential Employers To Consider Your Score Before Hiring You. And That’s Stupid.]]> Let's put it out there right now, I am personally not a fan of Klout, which ranks people based on their Internet interactions and engagement on services like Twitter, Facebook and Google+. I have nothing against the company whatsoever, and this is a vertical that someone was going to get into sooner or later. However, I still feel like the whole concept is bunk.]]> <![CDATA[As social data grows, researchers want to uncover its secrets]]> ]]> <![CDATA[The Flout-able, Doubt-able Klout]]> <![CDATA[Bad News For Bieber? Klout Unveils Redesign And A Scoring System That Looks At Real World Influence]]> Klout, the site that aims to measure your online influence, has made some big changes to its scoring system, and it has a new look to match the new algorithm. Founder and CEO Joe Fernandez says that the old Klout score looked at less than 100 "signals", while the new one looks at more than 400. Put another way, he says the amount of data points that the company analyzes daily is expanding from 1 billion to 12 billion. For the first time, Klout is including measures of real-world influence in its scores — in other words, it's looking for signs that you're Kind Of A Big Deal offline, even if you don't have hundreds of thousands of followers on Twitter. Those real-world data points include your Wikipedia page (if you're cool enough to have one — I'm not) and your job title on LinkedIn.]]> <![CDATA[BlogFrog Shows The Power of Women Bloggers But Trust Critical As Influencer Marketing Programs Rise In Popularity]]> It's of note to mention that BlogFrog has developed a platform that would not be possible without women bloggers. The newly available platform has a network of 100,000 "social influencers." Women represent 95% of that community.  These are women who write about parenting, food, health, fashion and home and garden.]]> <![CDATA[PeerIndex Hires Former Klout VP To Scale Up, And Cash In On Influencer Boom]]> PeerIndex, the Klout-like influencer ranking startup which this year picked up a $3 Million Series A round, is beefing up its team and scaling up operations. Specifically, it's hired Garth Holsinger, Klout's ex-VP of Sales and Business Development, to help accelerate their marketing and partnerships. This makes for a significant move, especially since they've lured him away from the very agency he set up after he left Klout. They're also bringing on David Galbraith (former co-founder of Moreover and co-founder of Yelp) and Rikk Carey (ex-Napster and co-founder of Plaxo) as advisers. These are pretty heavyweight names. And tonight they also go live with a campaign with on-demand limo service Uber. Busy busy.]]> <![CDATA[Kred Starts Offering Rewards So Maybe You’ll Finally Give A Damn About Your Influence Score]]> Kred today launches "Rewards" so you can win discounts and product samples if you get retweeted and Liked enough. That doesn't mean you should TRY to get retweeted or Liked more, but now there's at least a reason to sign up to see your influence score. While you might think this score is meaningless, marketers want to reach people who can actually influence others to care about them, and services like Klout and Kred are an efficient method. But it's not all about follower count. If you're going to give something away, you want to give it to someone who'll actually mention your company. That's why Kred Rewards are transparent, and brands can see why a recipient's score is high so they're not hooking up a hermit.]]> <![CDATA[Was I Too Hard On Klout’s Joe Fernandez?]]> I like Joe Fernandez a lot, more than I like most people. He's a true entrepreneur and badass, asking specifically to be onstage with me at LeWeb London because he knew that I had serious misgivings about his product, Klout. He told me he wanted a challenge and to put himself outside his comfort zone, both before and after the interview. Cool, anyone who's not scared of being in the hot seat garners my immediate esteem.]]> <![CDATA[The Weekly Pulse]]> <![CDATA[Klout For iPhone’s Big Update Adds Search And +K Features]]> Today, the influence measuring startup Klout is rolling out a major update to its iOS application, which first debuted in April. The initial version of the app offered Klout users a handy way to keep track of their Klout score on the go - it even made clever use of Apple's push notifications feature to do so, popping up your Klout score in the red badge on top of the Klout's homescreen icon. But the app itself was fairly rudimentary. Beyond fetching your score and providing a feed of related "notifications" (new followers, score changes and +K's), the app didn't do much else. But today, the new version of the app is introducing a couple more features which Klout users will like. Most notably, Klout is adding a search feature as well as a new way to quickly dole out +K's to others.]]> <![CDATA[A Bit Too Much Klout: User Says He Can Sign In To Someone Else’s Account]]> It's not clear if this is a one-off glitch, a signal of a bigger issue -- or a way of pumping up/sabotaging Klout scores for those who care. But it's not great news any way you spin it, if it's true: a Klout user has gotten in touch to say that when he accesses the social influence ratings service, he is getting signed in to Klout not as himself but as someone else. Using an HTC Sensation device running the Ice Cream Sandwich version of Android, IT consultant Halil Kabaca,of Istanbul, Turkey-based Novarum Consulting, tells us that when he goes on to Klout via the phone's mobile browser, he is being signed in automatically as someone completely different -- someone he doesn't know at all who happens to work for Adobe in business development (see screenshots of Kabaca's and the other guy's profiles after the break). ]]> <![CDATA[The Weekly Pulse]]> <![CDATA[Klout Releases New, Speedier API; Now Serves 1 Billion API Calls Per Day]]> Klout, the startup that measures influence on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Foursquare, Google+ and other social apps, has just released a new version of its API and released a number of new stats about its API usage. Klout evaluates users’ behavior with complex ranking algorithms and semantic analysis of content to measure the influence of individuals on social networks. Klout says it now serves about one billion API calls per day, which is 80 times the amount of data we served this time last year. Klout says that in the last three months, API calls have risen from 10.5 billion to almost 30 billion per month. The company now has 6,000 API (up from 2,000 partners a year ago).]]> <![CDATA[Klout, Where Have All the Egos Gone?]]> <![CDATA[Who’s to blame for Twitter spam? Obama, Gaga… and you]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Klout Takes Social Influence Mobile With New iOS App]]> Klout, the startup that measures influence on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Foursquare, Google+ and other social apps, is debuting its first mobile presence today with the launch of an iOS app. While Klout had a mobile website, this is the startup's first native mobile app. Klout evaluates users’ behavior with complex ranking algorithms and semantic analysis of content to measure the influence of individuals on social networks. The company is now topping 12 billion API calls, which is up from 100 million API calls in January 2011; and has more than 5,000 API partners, up from around 100 in early 2010. And it has indexed north of 100 million public profiles. Klout recently raised around $30 million in funding from Kleiner Perkins and others, with partner Chi-Hua Chien joining the startup’s board.]]> <![CDATA[Klout Launches Brand Pages To Help Companies Engage Influencers]]> Klout, the startup that measures influence on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Foursquare, Google+ and other social apps, is launching a new feature for companies today to help brands engage with influencers. Called Brand Squads, these dedicated profile pages allow companies to have a centralized place where they can engage with influencers. For background, Klout evaluates users' behavior with complex ranking algorithms and semantic analysis of content to measure the influence of individuals on social networks. The company is now topping 12 billion API calls, which is up from 100 million API calls in January 2011. The company has more than 5,000 API partners, up from around 100 in early 2010. And it has indexed north of 100 million public profiles. Klout also just raised around $30 million in funding from Kleiner Perkins and others, with partner Chi-Hua Chien joining the startup's board. ]]> <![CDATA[The Weekly Pulse]]> <![CDATA[PeerIndex Picks Up $3 Million To Win Friends And Influence People (And Beat Klout)]]> Whether you subscribe to the idea of social influence or not, services that mark -- or try to mark -- it are continuing to pick up momentum, and the latest example of that is PeerIndex, the UK-based social influence marketing platform, picking up a $3 million round of funding from a group of angel and private equity investors. The Series A round was led by Antrak Capital with participation from the ex-head of Reuters, Tom Glocer, as well as Restoration Partners chairman Ken Olisa and angel investor Sherry Coutu.]]> <![CDATA[Why Klout really matters: Money, money, money]]> ]]> <![CDATA[The Weekly Pulse]]> <![CDATA[Why Klout is making its bed with Hadoop and … Microsoft]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Klout Starts Rolling Out Perks That Match Your Score, Partners With Gilt For Discounts]]> Klout, the startup that measures influence on Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, Facebook and other social media sites, is expanding the functionality of its Perks program. Klout Perks are exclusive offers or experiences, given as a result of your Klout score. For the first time, Klout is matching savings based upon a specific score. The startup is partnering with flash sales site Gilt to allow Klout members to use their influence to receive a percentage off of their Gilt purchase that matches their Klout Score. For example, if your Klout Score is 81-100, you could receive up to 100 percent off of your purchase. ]]> <![CDATA[Semantic Web/Q&A Startup Beepl Loses Ex-TechCrunch CEO, Gears Up For Mobile App]]> The drive for more information has long been fueling the growth of the Internet, but that rising tide is not automatically lifting all boats, as one company trying to ride the wave has seen. Beepl, a Q&A startup co-founded last year and led by ex-TechCrunch writer Steve O'Hear, has now lost him as CEO over what TechCrunch understands to be a dispute around future strategy. O'Hear confirmed his departure to TechCrunch and says that he remains a minority shareholder and director -- although given his departure as CEO he may be leaving that role soon, too. It is not clear yet who is permanently replacing O'Hear as the CEO, but we have heard that the move comes at the same time that Beepl is pushing out a new release of its site and gearing up for a mobile app launch. ]]> <![CDATA[Klout makes its first acquisition: Local-mobile app Blockboard]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Klout Acquires Local And Mobile Neighborhood App Blockboard]]> Flush with new capital, Klout, the startup that measures influence on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Foursquare, Google+ and other social apps, is making its first acquisition. Klout is purchasing mobile and local neighborhood app Blockboard. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. Blockboard develops a neighborhood app through which neighbors can interact with one another. They can report potholes and graffiti directly to the city, alert each other about crime and vandalism through a Blockwatch, post general observations about the neighborhood, ask their neighbors questions, and post pictures of lost and found items. Basically, the app is focused on creating a community within real neighborhood.]]> <![CDATA[Like it or not, the reputation graph is here to stay]]> ]]> <![CDATA[The 6 People Twitter Should Bring if Stranded on a Desert Island]]> <![CDATA[11 Defining Digital Insights of 2011]]> <![CDATA[It’s time to punish terrible viral marketing]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Wahooly, the Klout and Kickstarter hybrid, opens to startups]]> ]]> <![CDATA[For online reputation, transparency is king]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Social Proof Is The New Marketing]]> As I’ve written about before, we’re in an amazing period of the consumer Internet.  Despite a shaky economy, many web companies are in hypergrowth.  This is reminiscent of the five-year period over a decade ago when companies like Amazon, Netscape, eBay, Yahoo, Google and PayPal were built. One challenge, which isn’t new, is the battle for consumer attention.  If you’re looking to grow your user base, is there a best way to cost-effectively attract valuable users?  I’m increasingly convinced the best way is by harnessing a concept called social proof, a relatively untapped gold mine in the age of the social web. What is social proof?  Put simply, it’s the positive influence created when someone finds out that others are doing something.  It’s also known as informational social influence.]]>