News about <![CDATA[Nokia]]> News about en-us <![CDATA[Should autonomous cars behave like automatons or act like human drivers?]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Smartphone theft nearly doubled in 2013]]> <![CDATA[Velodyne builds boats that tame waves, and seasickness]]> <![CDATA[Samsung's Enemies List Indicates Mobile OS In The Works]]> Samsung (OTC: SSNLF), theSouth Korean electronics giant,sells more smartphones than anyone. According to market research ...

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<![CDATA[After Market: End of the Tech Selloff, or a Dead Cat Bounce?]]> DailyFinance.com: Stock markets halted their bleeding Tuesday after three days of heavy selling. The Nasdaq, which had tumbled 4½ percent through the past three sessions, recovered a bit as many of the Internet and social media stocks that had led the decline turned... Read more]]> <![CDATA[Microsoft’s $7.2BN Deal To Buy Nokia’s Devices Business Gets The Nod In China]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[Delta flight attendants switch to Nokia Lumia 1520 phablets]]> <![CDATA[Nokia adopts Yandex search and app store for Russian Android push]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Nokia MixRadio milestones: 30M tracks, reported first global service in China]]> ]]> <![CDATA[China approval said to hold up Microsoft’s Nokia purchase, now pushed to April]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Nokia X Review: Windows Phone Maker Does Low-Cost Android Surprisingly Well]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[Microsoft And Nokia Now Expect Their Massive $7.2B Deal To Close In April]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[The 3 faces of Google's new 'Android Wear' technology that actually looks wearable]]> <![CDATA[Uncertainty Persists As The Nokia-Microsoft Deal Races Towards Deadline]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[With 1M pre-orders in China, the Nokia X could be a hit after all]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Nokia Says It’s Disappointed With Indian Court Ruling That Rejected Asset Transfer To Microsoft]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[Why it makes sense for Microsoft to waive Windows Phone license fees (for now)]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Lenovo: IBM server strike ain’t our problem]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Colorful Nokia Lumia 630 pictured in leak]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Spotify acquires Somerville firm The Echo Nest]]> <![CDATA[Apple isn’t going to take over your dashboard, but it will make it a lot easier to get apps into your car]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Market Wrap For March 3: Markets Lower On Ukraine Tension]]> U.S. stocks traded lower as investors worry Russia's next step in its use of military force in Ukraine.

The Dow saw its worst day in a month while other major indices finished noticeably lower. Investors moved away from equities and found what is believed to be a safe haven in gold

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<![CDATA[Android this week: Galaxy S5 launches; Nokia X hands-on; Android security boost]]> ]]> <![CDATA[This Week On The TC Gadgets Podcast: All MWC Everything]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[Nokia Lumia Icon review: The best Windows phone yet]]> ]]> <![CDATA[What the global tablet market will look like by 2017]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Microsoft Could Slash Windows Phone Licensing Fees By Up To 70% To Take On Low-Cost Androids]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[Microsoft exec Larson-Green heads to new position as Elop takes over devices division]]> <![CDATA[Disrupter Alert: Mozilla Says It Will Unleash A Flood Of $25 Smartphones]]>  

Android giant, Samsung (OTC: SSNLF) may have stolen thunder with the launch of its long-awaited Galaxy S5 Monday at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, but as keen observers noted, Mozilla had a little thunder-stealing of its own up its sleeve.

With all the attention on Samsung, not everyone noticed that

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<![CDATA[You May Have Never Heard of ARM, But It Powers Your Favorite Devices]]> DailyFinance.com: Bloomberg/Chris Ratcliffe By Ashlee Vance This is a story about ARM Holdings (ARMH), the mobile technology company that has arguably had a more profound effect on modern living than just about any other company. ARM is a company made up mostly of... Read more]]> <![CDATA[HTC And Nokia Troll Samsung]]> Read More
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<![CDATA[Market Wrap For February 24: Markets Showing Strength To Start The Week]]> U.S. stocks rose as investors as the S&P 500 traded at new historical highs and clearing its 2014 losses.

Investors shrugged off disappointing earning reports and economic data and chose to focus on several prominent merger and acquisition activities.

The S&P 500 hit a new intra-day all time high of 1,858.71 while

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<![CDATA[Europe: We don’t know what 5G is yet, but we’re damn sure going to lead the way with it]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Seattle heads to Barcelona: Local companies flock to Mobile World Congress]]> <![CDATA[Apple's Acquisitions Hint At A Living Room Expansion]]> Over the past 15 months, Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL) has bought more than 20 relatively small companies that seem to have one thing in common: the products are intended for living room use.

One of the company's Apple acquired reads body movements, another recommends TV programs. Several others offered location

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<![CDATA[Now that the Nokia X is real, should Microsoft kill it or keep it? (I vote for keep)]]> ]]> <![CDATA[If You Want Android On A Nokia, The Nokia X Is Probably Your Last Chance]]> Nokia unveiled a few new Android powered Nokia X smartphones at MWC this year, and they look like an interesting combination of Nokia’s existing design choices with Windows Phone, Microsoft’s services and Google’s mobile OS. As interesting as they appear, however, and regardless of their ultimate merits, don’t expect them to usher in a new continuing lineup of Nokia Android hardware. I argued in a previous Droidcast on TechCrunch that the Nokia/Android mashup was essentially a non-starter; the alliance appears to have been in the pipeline already when Microsoft began the process of taking over Nokia’s hardware division, but there are clear indications that Nokia’s new owners won’t be as open to the idea of seeing the experiment through. In a blog post, Microsoft’s Corporate Vice President of Communications Frank X. Shaw provided a short summary of Microsoft and Nokia’s role and announcements at MWC this year. The letter is noteworthy in that it’s more reserved than what we normally see from Shaw, and in that it only mentions ‘Android’ once – and then only when Shaw is referencing competitor devices that the Nokia X competes with, and not the X line itself. Perhaps most telling is this excerpt, which Shaw offers as a means of contextualizing the Nokia X project: First, our transaction with Nokia has not yet closed. Today, we operate as two independent companies as required by antitrust law, and we will until the acquisition is complete. The anticipated close timeframe for the acquisition remains end of the first quarter of 2014. In other words, what Nokia is currently doing ? what Microsoft will be doing with Nokia’s hardware division once the deal goes through, which is expected to happen towards the end of March this year. Shaw goes on to emphasize the importance of getting Microsoft services out there in the hands of consumers, which the Nokia X project helps to accomplish, but he sums up with a reminder that Windows Phone is Microsoft’s main bet in the smartphone realm, and nothing happening at MWC will change that. Of course, Microsoft could stick with Android if these Nokia X devices prove to be very popular with the emerging market crowd they appear to target, and that results in a huge spike in usage of MS services. But the chances of that seem extremely low, and reading between the lines I’d say it’s almost certain Nokia’s Android]]> <![CDATA[Nokia’s Forking Of Android Could Leave Google Licking Its Lips After All]]> Back in October last year, I first heard rumblings that Nokia was working on an Android handset. "Devs rumor but rather solid, not confirmed by eye," said my source. Not long afterwards, others began to report similar rumours. However, at the time it remained unclear if this was simply the remnants of an existing skunkworks project that or something more significant. ]]> <![CDATA[Beyond the smartphone: Facebook, Ericsson build an app lab for the developing world]]> ]]> <![CDATA[An Intel-powered cellular network? It’s slowly starting to happen]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Facebook-led Internet.org Partners With Nokia On SocialEDU In Rwanda, Unilever In India, Ericsson On New Lab To Connect Developing Economies]]> Later today Facebook CEO Marc Zuckerberg will be appearing onstage at Mobile World Congress -- his first appearance at the Barcelona-based event -- to talk about bridging digital divide. Ahead of that Internet.org, the Facebook-led project to help bring connectivity to developing economies, has unveiled a number of new projects: an education partnership with Nokia and local carrier Airtel, edX and the government in Rwanda called SocialEDU; a project with Unilever in India; and a new Internet.org Innovation Lab with Ericsson in its Menlo Park HQ. ]]> <![CDATA[Nokia announces Asha 230 and Nokia 220 feature phones]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Hands on with the Android-powered Nokia X smartphone]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Nokia Forks Android In Mobile Services Push — $122 Nokia X Will Also Be Lumia “Feeder”]]> More proof, if proof were needed, that Android won the smartphone OS wars: Nokia, the former world No.1 smartphone maker and, nowadays, the primary OEM for Microsoft’s third-placed Windows Phone platform has just announced a new family of smartphones built upon the Android Open Source Project — confirming a slew of earlier rumours that Nokia was cooking up an Android device strategy. The first device in Nokia’s Droidy new family was unveiled today at its Mobile World Conference press conference in Barcelona, with both the forthcoming family and this its debut member known as the Nokia X. The twist is it doesn’t look like the standard icon-filled Android that the market is used to, being dressed up in a new Nokia UI. “The Nokia X software platform is built upon AOSP, Android Open Source Project,” said Nokia’s marketing director for its mobile phones division, Neil Broadley. ”What we’ve done is we’ve built the Nokia X software platform on standard Android open source, and then on top of that we’ve built the Nokia user experience layer — so the Nokia UI — so Fast Lane and the homescreen. “The homescreen is tile-based, so it’s similar to a [Windows Phone-based] Lumia. It incorporates some elements of that — some limited live information into the tiles. We’ve also put in Nokia and Microsoft services.” The 4-inch wVGA, dual-core 1GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon handset, which comes in Nokia’s now familiar spectrum of eye-arresting colours (including bright green, red and yellow) and also packs a 3MP camera, costs €89/$122 (excluding taxes & subsidies) — and is launching immediately, shipping as early as next week. Nokia said it is planning a global rollout for the X but the initial focus will be on “key, fast-growing emerging markets” — including India, China, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam and Russia. Aka, markets where low cost Androids are already well established. The Nokia X’s price-point undercuts the affordably priced Moto G handset, for instance, a relatively recent Android that is also targeting emerging markets. But the handset still doesn’t go as low as scores of hyper budget Droids (sub-$50 handsets are big in Africa, for instance). So expect other handsets in the Nokia X family to look to squeeze the price-point further south. The other twist here: no new Lumia smartphones being unboxed by Nokia, the only substantial Windows Phone OEM, at the world’s largest mobile devices conference. A new platform strategy  What exactly is Nokia doing with]]> <![CDATA[Microsoft, Qualcomm offer a Windows Phone design-in-a-box to handset makers]]> ]]> <![CDATA[In transit: Nokia’s Here maps moves from Windows RT to Windows 8.1]]> ]]> <![CDATA[The next big step for cellular networks isn’t 5G. It’s the cloud]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Market Wrap For Febuary 20: S&P 500 Inches Closer To New Highs]]> U.S. stocks overcame mixed economic data and earning reports as the S&P 500 inches towards new all time highs and the Dow recorded an almost triple digit point gain.

Jobless claims declined less than expected while consumer prices met expectations and rose slightly. Data from the Philadelphia Fed showed manufacturing activity

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<![CDATA[Satya says: “One Microsoft” push is on]]> ]]> <![CDATA[Nokia Launches $30 NFC Tag For Keeping Tabs On Your Lumia Phone’s Whereabouts]]> Nokia has unveiled a new accessory designed to make sure users of its Lumia smartphone are never parted from their handset. Or at least, that when they leave the house with their tagged keys or bag, they'll be reminded to pick up their phone too.]]>