Dr. Jack Wheeler, whose death-defying adventures span the globe and whose achievements have inspired wide-ranging acclaim, is providing accurate, insider information about the many staff changes within the Bush administration and federal agencies.

On his unique intelligence website, To the Point, Wheeler analyzes recent shake-ups at the CIA and a key departure from the president’s national security staff.

Writes Wheeler: “‘The Sheriff,’ as new CIA Director Porter Goss is becoming known, is getting rave reviews from the agency’s rank and file for serving notice to the Rogue Weasels that their left-wing views and attempts to sabotage the Bush administration will receive zero tolerance. ‘Watch for a lot of road kill on 123 (Route 123, the highway in McLean, Va., that goes past the CIA main entrance) as the weasels scurry away,’ I’m told.”

Wheeler continues: “Found lying on the roadside [Thursday] was weasel leader Mike Scheuer, who wrote the Bush-trashing ‘Imperial Hubris’ book under the pseudonym ‘Anonymous.’ While a lot of what Scheuer wrote was right on the mark, namely his withering criticism of the FBI and of senior agency guys (like Tenet) doing the CYA dance over 9-11, he twisted it all into bashing Bush and making an argument for John Kerry-type terrorism-is-a-nuisance-and-law-enforcement problem. That the CIA Review Office allowed him to write this book is a scandal never to be repeated under Sheriff Goss’s watch.”

Available only to subscribers of To the Point, Wheeler’s piece, entitled “An exodus of weasels,” goes on to analyze Bob Blackwill’s sudden resignation from the National Security Council. Wheeler hits Blackwill for advocating negotiations with the terrorists holding Fallujah in April when U.S. forces were poised to take the city.

“All of the problems with Fallujah since, such as the terrorism unleashed by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi who used Fallujah as his base, can be laid at Blackwill’s feet,” Wheller writes.

To read this kind of concise, hard-hitting analysis each week, subscribe to Wheeler’s To the Point.

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Besides writing for To the Point, Wheeler heads the Freedom Research Foundation, which currently is working on what he calls the Free Iran Project. The project applies “Reagan Doctrine strategies toward the liberation of Iran,” he explained.

The website is global, Wheeler says, “but we really focus on issues people are really interested in … key areas of geo-strategic and national security import for the United States.”

‘Religion without a future’

Wheeler said Islam is also a focus of To the Point, including “the nature of Islam and the problems Islam faces – with regard to us and with regard to its own future.”

“Quite frankly,” he said, “there are a lot of extinct religions in the history pages, and Islam is going to become extinct unless it’s reformed.

“When you start blowing yourself up, when you get that kind of insane desperation, you’re history,” he said. “This is a religion without a future unless it reforms.”

On his site, Wheeler includes a subscription article comparing the Aztecs with Arabs: “Both the Arabs and the Aztecs invented a religion of jihad as a rationale to justify their imperialist empires. …”

“War – Holy War – became the purpose of the Aztec state. All soldiers in the Aztec army were holy warriors, warriors of the gods. Peace was dangerous. No war meant no prisoners to sacrifice, no food for the gods, which risked the destruction of mankind and the universe itself. The only way to avoid cosmic disaster was for the Aztecs to accept the burden fate had given them and wage perpetual war for the salvation of humanity.

“All in all, a pretty clever rationalization for a monstrous imperialist tyranny, wouldn’t you say? Sounds like they were taking religion-inventing lessons from the Arabs.”

Adventure in his blood

Wheeler has always been drawn by the thrill and accomplishment of adventure. He became the youngest Eagle Scout in history at age 12 before becoming the youngest person to climb the Matterhorn in Switzerland at age 14.

“People collect things,” Wheeler explains. “They collect stamps, or coins, or porcelain. At 14, I decided what I wanted was to collect extraordinary experiences. You could lose your stamps or coins, but you can never lose what you have done with your life.”

Wheeler swam the Hellespont like Leander in Greek mythology, was adopted into a tribe of Amazon headhunters and successfully hunted a man-eating tiger in South Vietnam while still in high school.

“My intellectual adventures began when I read Ayn Rand, Ludwig von Mises and Aristotle, inspiring me to get a Ph.D. in Philosophy,” he said. “I explored Africa, the Gobi, Mongolia, Central Asia, Tibet, the Himalayas, the Andes, Borneo and the South Pacific, discovered lost tribes in New Guinea and the Kalahari, took elephants over the Alps in Hannibal’s footsteps, skydived onto the North Pole, roused anti-Marxist guerrillas from Angola to Afghanistan and helped get rid of the Soviet Union.”

Forty years after Wheeler’s historic climb of the Matterhorn, he ascended the mountain again, this time with his 14-year-old eldest son, Brandon.

Wheeler completes his column entitled “What life is all about” this way:

“No lion, sitting underneath an acacia tree in the Serengeti, asks himself, ‘What does it mean to be a lion? What is the purpose of my existence?’ A lion has no choice but to unselfconsciously follow his genetic program. But human beings have to figure out how and why to survive, they have to choose a rationale that gives purpose and meaning for their lives. My choice has been to try and make my life, and now the life of my son, a thrilling adventure.”

Wheeler has worn many labels throughout his decades as an adventurer and geopolitical expert. The Wall Street Journal called him “the originator of the Reagan Doctrine.” The Washington Post called him “The Indiana Jones of the Right,” and Izvestiya, the organ of the Soviet Communist Party, called him an “ideological gangster.”

Wheeler says his site offers readers “mind-stretching pro-America insights on our lives, our politics and our world.”

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., sums up Wheeler’s extraordinary life:

“Jack Wheeler is just about the most interesting man I know. As a professional adventurer, he has discovered lost tribes and led expeditions to every corner of the globe. As a geopolitical strategist, he created the Reagan Doctrine, which led to the demise of the Soviet Union. He is a brilliantly original thinker and deeply perceptive analyst of world events. I value his counsel and friendship.”

Here’s how Wheeler describes his online resource:

“To The Point intends to be both the world’s most accurate and insightful geopolitical intelligence service, and a pro-America, pro-capitalist, pro-Western Civilization intellectual ammunition service for defenders of liberty.

“Our goal is for our subscribers to look upon To The Point as an oasis of reason and insight. Our subscribers are becoming the most highly informed people in America.”

Subscribe to Dr. Jack Wheeler’s To the Point.

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