Many excellent pro-life movies and documentaries have been recently released covering a wide spectrum of our issues. In fact, the movies seem to be coming so fast I have delayed posting this column several weeks to try to catch the latest. Even last week I read of one more but have to draw the line somewhere.

My star rating is out of four possible. Because of the volume, I am providing thumbnail reviews. Films are listed in alphabetical order.

22 Weeks

Stars: 3-1/2

Released Winter 2009. 28 minutes. Docudrama. Winner 2009 Excellence in Media Angel Award. Synopsis: Tells true story of April 2005 late-term abortion in Orlando, Fla., where baby survived but was denied help by clinic workers despite pleas from mother. Not rated, but I’d consider it PG13 for disturbing scenes. Could have been tightened, just a little. Previously covered by WorldNetDaily.com. $10 online.

Come What May

Stars: 2-1/2

Released Spring 2009. Dove-family approved. 93 minutes. Fiction. Synopsis: Pro-life college law student argues against Roe v. Wade in “moot court” while pro-abortion mother argues against parental notification before the U.S. Supreme Court. Patrick Henry College student production (and school infomercial) – impressive in that regard but not up to Hollywood standards. Good information on Roe v. Wade decision; good love story role modeling. $10-15 online. Purchase “Come What May” at the WND SuperStore.

Demographic Winter

Stars: 4

Released Spring 2008. 56 minutes. Documentary. Synopsis: Details the catastrophic social and economic consequences of the worldwide population decline. Sobering, must see – more than once. $18 online.

The follow-up to this movie, “Demographic Bomb,” was released June 20, but I only have seen a press release about it. Purchase “Demographic Winter” at the WND SuperStore.

Killing Girls

Stars: 4

Released Spring 2009. 52 and 80 minute DVD versions as well as downloadable. Nominated Best Film in two 2009 European film festivals. Documentary. Synopsis: Examines late-term abortions in Russia, where 80 percent of mothers abort. Many young girls purposefully wait until second trimester. Director gained access to large St. Petersburg hospital abortion ward. Does not take pro-life or pro-abortion position. Goes into Russian history to help explain current sad scenario. More complete Stanek review in WND. $23 online.

Lines That Divide: The Great Stem Cell Debate

Stars: 4

Released June 2009. 57 minutes. Documentary. Synopsis: First, I promise this film is not boring, making excellent use of movie clips and celebrity sound bites in combination with graphics and interviews of scientists on both sides of the debate. Covered are not only ethics but women’s health as well as media, political and terminology obfuscation. Very current information provided. $20 online.

Maafa 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America

Stars: 4

Released June 2009. 135 minutes. Documentary. Synopsis: Revealing, articulately documented analysis of the black eugenics movement that was launched in America with the secession of slavery, now a worldwide onslaught spearheaded by Planned Parenthood. Surprising insights from black leader Jesse Jackson before he sold out. Surprising quotes from pro-black eugenics Republican presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. Only warning: Long, although necessarily. May need to take 1-2 intermissions. $10-20 online, depending on quantity ordered.

The Terri Schiavo Story

Stars: 4

Released Spring 2009. 50 minutes. Winner Best Documentary 2009 San Antonio Independent Christian Film Festival. Hosted by Joni Eareckson Tada. Synopsis: Gives behind the scenes look at the court decision to euthanize Terri as well as family reflections and publicity surrounding her death. $18 online.

Thine Eyes

Stars: 3

Released April 2009. Documentary of 2009 36th annual March for Life. Narrated by Jennifer O’Neill. Synopsis: Uses six cameras and travels on student buses to and from March to describe its magnitude and impact. Falls short on basics: Alludes to but doesn’t describe events surrounding March or the March route itself. Stationary camera doesn’t show entire time-elapsed March; frustrating. Still superior to mainstream media coverage, or lack thereof. 50 minutes. Covered by WorldNetDaily’s Jack Cashill here and here, who helped produce the film and write the script. $20 online.

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