Michael Savage (San Francisco Chronicle)

Top-rated talk-radio host Michael Savage has accepted an invitation to debate free speech and political correctness at the revered two-century-old Cambridge Union Society in England.

The invitation to Savage, author of over 25 books with a radio audience of 10 million listeners, came after he was banned from entering the United Kingdom in May by Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s government along with Muslim extremists and leaders of hate groups. Savage has threatened a lawsuit if his name is not removed.

Savage, who will argue his case at Cambridge Oct. 15 via an Internet link, says he wants to “save England from a descent into mental slavery where petty bureaucrats dictate what can and cannot be discussed.”

Savage said the debate “should awaken all free British citizens to the disastrous state the Brown government has created.”

“By speaking passionately about freedom of speech, I hope to appeal to the British people and the incoming conservative leadership to remove my name from their list of murderers and terrorists,” he said.

He quotes former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, who said, “You see these dictators on their pedestals, surrounded by the bayonets of their soldiers and the truncheons of their police. They are afraid of words and thoughts! Words spoken abroad, thoughts stirring at home, all the more powerful because they are forbidden. These terrify them. A little mouse – a little tiny mouse! – of thought appears in the room, and even the mightiest potentates are thrown into panic.”

Savage received an invitation letter July 2 that said the Cambridge Union had been following his case “with great interest” and believed he was “more qualified than anyone to talk about the subject of political correctness in America and Britain.”

The student society at the University of Cambridge wants Savage to speak for the opposition in a debate titled “This House Believes Political Correctness is Sane and Necessary.”

The society, founded in 1815, has hosted the likes of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and American presidents Ronald Reagan and Theodore Roosevelt.


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