Editor’s Note: The following report is excerpted from Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin, the premium online newsletter published by the founder of WND. Subscriptions are $99 a year or, for monthly trials, just $9.95 per month for credit card users, and provide instant access for the complete reports.

The outgoing chief of Israeli military intelligence is warning against the possibility of a large-scale war – and a skyrocketing death toll – the next time there’s a blowup in the Middle East, since Russia is providing superior weapons to Syria, according to a report from Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin.

“The next conflict, even if it is limited in scale,” said Maj. Gen. Amos Yadlin, “will be much bigger, much broader, and with many more casualties than we saw in Operation Cast Lead or the Second Lebanon War.”

The general said that modern air defense systems Russia is providing to Syria could send the Israel Defense Forces and Israeli Air Force capabilities “back to their status in the 1970s Suez years.”

He pointed out that the Russians also are upgrading older Syrian weapons systems while providing some of Moscow’s latest weapons systems.

He also claimed that the Iranians are developing two new nuclear sites but didn’t reveal their locations.

“Iran is the greatest threat to Israel and to the well-being of the entire region,” he said.

While Iran has sufficient uranium enriched at 20 percent that could be applied to developing a nuclear bomb if enrichment capabilities improve to some 90 percent, Yadlin said that Iran, with its 4,000 centrifuges, could go from civilian-grade enriched uranium to the level required for a bomb.

Read this and other intelligence briefs at Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin:

Keep in touch with the most important breaking news stories about critical developments around the globe with Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin, the premium, online intelligence news source edited and published by the founder of WND.

For the complete report and full immediate access to Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin, subscribe now.

 

Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.