Jeremiah Denton
Adm. Jeremiah Denton, Retired

Two of America’s most legendary living military heroes have joined forces to rebuke the lame-duck Senate for repealing “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” and to urge the new Congress to overturn that controversial vote.

They are also asking all military veterans and all Americans to read the current issue of Whistleblower magazine, called “DROPPING THE ‘H’-BOMB,” which for the first time is can be read FREE online.

“We each contributed our views to this special edition of Whistleblower, and believe it is the best single resource for understanding the implications, ramifications, and potential unintended consequences of repeal of the ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ policy,” said former U.S. senator, POW and retired Navy admiral Jeremiah Denton and Medal of Honor recipient Maj. Gen. Patrick Brady, now retired from the U.S. Army.

“DROPPING THE ‘H’-BOMB” is about what will happen once open homosexuality – officially prohibited in the U.S. military continuously since George Washington’s time – is permitted throughout the armed forces as soon as the Senate’s repeal of the Clinton-era “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy is implemented in the coming weeks and months.

Patrick H. Brady
Maj. Gen. Patrick Brady, Retired

Critics say the policy reversal, rammed through Congress to satisfy a 2008 pre-election promise Barack Obama made to his LGBT constituency, recklessly dismantles the time-tested rules, culture and discipline that have guided America’s military since the nation’s founding.

“We felt this issue of Whistleblower was so important that we decided, for the first time ever, to make it available to everybody for free – online,” said Whistleblower editor David Kupelian. “The decision to put it on the Internet was reached after numerous requests, especially from members of The American Legion, and with the enthusiastic encouragement of both Adm. Denton and Gen. Brady.”

The Legion has been in the forefront of urging retention of the military’s centuries-old ban on homosexuality in the military, with National Commander Jimmie L. Foster urging the White House last October to resist a California judge’s attempt to single-handedly reverse the military’s “gay” ban.

Brady, a retired U.S. Army major general and helicopter pilot, was awarded America’s highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for a series of rescues during the Vietnam War in which he used 3 helicopters to rescue over 60 wounded. At the end of the day his aircraft had over 400 holes in them from enemy fire and mines. In two tours in Vietnam he flew over 2,500 combat missions and rescued over 5,000 wounded. Some pundits recognize him as the most decorated living veteran. His website is GeneralBrady.com.

Denton’s hero status remains unchallenged to this day. Flying missions over North Vietnam as a Navy pilot, he was shot down and spent seven years and eight months as a POW, famously blinking the word T-O-R-T-U-R-E in Morse code during an internationally broadcast TV interview to reveal that the communist regime in Hanoi was coercing American POWs with torture. After release from the longest confinement of any American POW – which included four years in solitary confinement – he returned to the United States to his wife and seven children, was elected to the U.S. Senate representing the state of Alabama, and even was called into the Oval Office by President Ronald Reagan for Denton’s expertise on how to vanquish the communist beachhead in Nicaragua. His classic book, “When Hell was in Session,” documents his nearly eight years in captivity – as well as his shock at the moral decline he discovered in America upon his return.

Here’s today’s joint statement from Denton and Brady:

Urgent message from Adm. Jeremiah Denton (USN, ret.) and Maj. Gen. Patrick Brady (USA, ret.), MOH

A ‘WHISTLEBLOWER’ EVERY VETERAN AND EVERY AMERICAN NEEDS TO HEED REGARDING ‘DON’T ASK, DON’T TELL’

We are gratified to join with Joseph Farah, founder and editor of WorldNetDaily.com, and David Kupelian, managing editor of WorldNetDaily and editor of its Whistleblower magazine, to make available to you online the February 2011 edition of Whistleblower – “DROPPING THE ‘H’-BOMB” – which is devoted entirely to the coming transformation of the American military due to the repeal of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy.

We each contributed our views to this special edition of Whistleblower, and believe it is the best single resource for understanding the implications, ramifications, and potential unintended consequences of repeal of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy and consequent creation of a “quad-sexual military” (heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual and transgender) in which open homosexuality is not only allowed, but authorized and approved for the first time in American military history.

As two who have proudly served in our nation’s military in war, we believe such a transformation of the unique military culture is fraught with danger to our armed forces – and to our nation. Therefore, we believe that the 112th Congress should and must reinstate the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy which was hastily and shamefully repealed by the “lame duck” 111th Congress before the newly elected 112th Congress could consider the issue with the care and deliberation it deserves.

Every American in military service, every veteran, every citizen should be fully informed as to the impact and implications of the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” We can think of no better source for such information and analysis than Whistleblower’s February “DROPPING THE ‘H’-BOMB” issue.

We salute Joseph Farah and David Kupelian of WorldNetDaily.com for making it available online for the first time, and urge all Americans – veterans in particular, including those in service – to read and consider the February issue of Whistleblower on repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” and to share it with as many Americans as possible.

Kupelian – noting that the House Armed Services Committee, under chairman Rep. Buck McKeon, R.-Calif., is planning on challenging the Senate’s hasty repeal of the policy that has governed America’s armed forces since Revolutionary War days – said this:

“Many members of Congress have no clue what repeal of ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ really means. Many think inviting open homosexuality into the armed forces is just a nice, touchy-feely matter of equal rights. They have no idea of the negative impact this will have on the morale and cohesion of our troops, of why the blood supply will more likely become infected with HIV, of the problems with imposing gay sensitivity training, of the fact that homosexuals in the military already sexually prey on their fellow service members at a rate three times higher than heterosexuals. They simply have no idea what this policy change will really mean for those serving in our military.

“And yet, very soon, unless the new-and-improved 112th Congress rides to the rescue like the cavalry on horseback, our military will be forced to suffer a radical, politically correct, social-engineering experiment – during wartime. There’s a real opportunity, right now, to reverse this terrible injustice and make things right. But citizens must make their voices heard. Therefore I encourage every American to read ‘DROPPING THE ‘H’-BOMB’ to more fully understand just how big a betrayal this thoughtless lame-duck vote was for the people who put their lives on the line to defend our freedoms.”

Read “DROPPING THE ‘H’-BOMB” online.

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