Climate change conference at the U.N. in New York in November 2015.

Climate change conference at the U.N. in New York in November 2015.

President Obama addressed diplomats at a reception Friday, the day after a jihadist killed 84 people in France, and said the United Nations’ plan for sustainable development and global unity is all that’s needed to defeat the terrorists.

Obama called for “a new sustainable development set of goals to end extreme poverty and promote health and education and equality for all people, including women.”

That was a direct reference to the U.N.’s new “2030 Agenda,” in which the new sustainable development goals or SDGs are being promoted as the answer to all of mankind’s problems — including the eradication of poverty and saving the planet from climate change.

The 2030 Agenda, which is the U.N.’s updated version of Agenda 21, also includes for the first time the rights of migrants to move across open borders for economic opportunity.

“Obama simply reflects his globalist handlers when he suggests that the solution to the world’s problems will be found in everyone’s submission to a single globalist power,” writes Patrick Wood for Technocracy News and Trends.

Obama told the ambassadors gathered at the reception that the world needs to “build strong institutions to protect people from those impulses” of national or cultural pride. This seemed to be a reference to supporters of Donald Trump in the U.S. and other nationalist-oriented parties gaining popularity in Europe. These parties are now calling for their countries to follow Britain’s recent example and exit the European Union.

That’s a path that will not succeed in America or anywhere else, Obama said.

“In other words, all Americans should stop being so selfish and self-centered and surrender themselves to the global ‘common good,'” Wood wrote.

Obama added that “hatred and violence of a few ultimately is no match for the love and decency and hard work of people of goodwill and compassion.”

He said the world needed to work with “our Muslim partners” to “push back against hateful ideologies that twist and distort Islam – a religion that teaches peace and justice and compassion.”

“We will defeat these ideologies by offering a better vision of development and economic progress,” Obama added.

Watch President Obama’s complete 10-minute speech to the diplomatic corps:

If the U.S. is engaged in a war against Islamic terror, Obama doesn’t know it, Wood said, or at least isn’t treating it as such.

“In a war, the object is to crush the enemy into total defeat,” he said. “In Obama’s war, we are supposed to crush them with love, decency, goodwill and compassion.”

Wood, author of “Technocracy Rising: The Trojan Horse of Global Transformation,” said the globalist technocrats behind Obama may well be invisible to the general public, but they are there.

“For the sake of implementing technocracy, Obama is merely one of their many ‘useful idiots’ who spew propaganda about things they know little about,” Wood said.

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In his book, Wood explains the technocracy movement as a system run by mostly un-elected bureaucrats using scientific data. Supported by globalist elites, this movement will end in totalitarianism, Wood believes.

Michele Bachmann

Michele Bachmann

Michele Bachmann, former congresswoman from Minnesota, was also appalled at Obama’s comments.

“Innocent police officers are being targeted and gunned down in America’s streets and, still, the American president ignores the bloody, lawless reality of cop killing in favor of his fantasy political agenda,” Bachmann told WND.

“He intends to fundamentally transform the world into global submission of humankind to a global political/economic elite,” she added. “The reality of these fantasy schemes will prove to be as cruel as Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot, Idi Amin, etc. were in the last century.”

Clare Lopez, vice president of research and analysis for the Center for Security Policy, a Washington think tank focusing on national security, said the president’s comments ignore the facts of history when it comes to political Islamism, which is far more than just another religion. It will take more than a good jobs program to derail jihadism, as suggested last year by one of Obama’s State Department spokeswomen, Marie Harf.

“Magnificent civilizations including the Byzantines and Persians had great employment figures and were among the most highly-developed culturally of their time,” Lopez said. “But they both went down to Islam – not because they didn’t offer enough ‘development and economic progress,’ but because they were brutally overcome by the Islamic forces.

“Jobs for jihadis won’t help us either if we don’t name the enemy – all who support jihad to impose shariah – and devise and execute a whole-of-government, whole-of-society strategy to defeat the Global Islamic Movement.

Below is a partial transcript of his speech:

And in contrast to these terrorists who only know how to kill and destroy, we’re going to win this fight by building; by never giving up on diplomacy to end the Syrian civil war; by working with partners around the world, including Muslim communities, to push back against hateful ideologies that twist and distort Islam — a religion that teaches peace and justice and compassion. We will defeat these ideologies by offering a better vision of development and economic progress, so people, especially young people, have more hope and opportunity and are less susceptible to extremism and violence in the first place. And we will continue to promote political opportunity and democracy so citizens have a say in their future.

And we will win this fight by staying true to our values — values of pluralism and rule of law and diversity and freedoms, like the freedom of religion, freedom of speech and assembly — the very freedoms that the people of Nice were celebrating last night on Bastille Day. In the wake of last night’s attacks, we’ve heard more suggestions that all Muslims in America be targeted, tested for their beliefs; some deported or jailed. And the very suggestion is repugnant and an affront to everything that we stand for as Americans.

We cannot give in to fear, or turn on each other, or sacrifice our way of life. We cannot let ourselves be divided by religion — because that’s exactly what the terrorists want. We should never do their work for them. And here in the United States, our freedoms — including freedom of religion — help keep us strong and safe, and we have to be vigilant and defend our security and our freedoms.

And all of us — whatever nations we represent here — I think have to step back and reflect on what we are doing to eliminate this kind of chronic violence. It’s been a difficult several weeks in the United States. But the divide that exists is not between races and ethnicities and religions; it is between people who recognize the common humanity of all people and are willing to build institutions that promote that common humanity, and those who do not — those who would suggest that somebody is less than them because of their tribe, or their ethnicity, or their faith, or their color. And those impulses exist in all our countries. And those impulses, when we do not speak out against them and build strong institutions to protect people from those impulses, they can take over, they can be unleashed — so that all of us have responsibilities, not just a few.

I want to say that even as we are relentless against terrorists, it’s also worthy for us to recognize that our nations have worked together for security and peace and human dignity around the world. I want to thank so many of your countries for the partnership that we’ve forged and the progress we’ve achieved together over these past eight years in rescuing the global economy and securing vulnerable nuclear materials. A comprehensive deal to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. Halting the spread of Ebola, and thereby saving countless lives. In Paris, the most ambitious agreement in history to fight climate change. A new sustainable development set of goals to end extreme poverty and promote health and education and equality for all people, including women.

And through the efforts of many of you, we’ve continued to try to move beyond old conflicts: Supporting the transition to democracy in Burma. Forging a new partnership with Vietnam. Deepening our new chapter of engagement with the Cuban people. Helping to support the efforts in Colombia to end the decades-long conflict. That’s the power of diplomacy. That’s what’s possible when our nations and our peoples work together in a spirit of mutual interest and mutual respect.”

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