Are you one of those people who think the Old Testament is the handiwork of a vengeful God as opposed to the New Testament in which Jesus first introduces the world to grace through faith?

If so, you will be most surprised by what you read in my upcoming work, “The Gospel in Every Book of the Old Testament,” which shows the entire Bible, from cover to cover, represents one integrated message of redemption and restoration, including all 39 books of the Hebrew Scriptures.

But it’s even more than that, despite what some post-modern mega-pastors are teaching these days. It’s also a thoroughly miraculous book in which the Hebrew Scriptures prophesy and foreshadow events that will take place in the Greek Scriptures.

Let me give you an example, not from my book, but from some fascinating commentaries I recently discovered in BibleTools.org on Genesis 14-15 – and what happens to Abraham after he asks God for evidence that He will follow through on His promises to make a great nation of his descendants.


Joseph Farah’s new book, “The Gospel in Every Book of the Old Testament,” is available now in digital e-book at Amazon.com and the WND Superstore. The hardcover edition will be released in September, but Special VIP Advance Reader Copies are available in the WND Superstore for a donation of $100 or more to support the massive first printing that will be necessary to meet early demand this fall.


In Genesis 14, we meet the mysterious Melchizedek, king and high priest of Salem, the precursor to Jerusalem. He greets Abraham, still known then as Abram, who had just returned from a fierce battle in which he rescued his nephew Lot who had been taken captive along with the people and goods of Sodom and Gomorrah by four other nation-states. Abram is greeted by Melchizedek who brings forth bread and wine and pronounces, “Blessed be Abram of the most high God, possessor of heaven and earth.” Consider the bread and wine offering as a foreshadowing of the one made by Jesus at the beginning of a future Nissan 14 pre-Passover observance. Melchizedek is described as “a priest for ever” in Psalm 110:4 and is described as a prototypical Jesus figure in Hebrews 7. Even his title, King of Salem, literally means King of Peace.

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In Genesis 15:5-12, Abraham is commanded by God to prepare a sacrifice – one that will formally establish His everlasting covenant with his faithful follower and friend. Because of the seeming proximity of this event with the ceremony between Melchizedek and Abram, the commentaries surmise it could have been the same day – Nissan 14, the date that would become known as the day before Passover in the time of Moses. God instructs Abram, “Look now toward heaven, and tell the stars, if thou be able to number them: and he said unto him, So shall thy seed be.” Notice how it’s now dark, possibly the evening of Nissan 14 leading into Nissan 15, the date of what will become known several centuries later as Passover.

The next day, the sacrifice is prepared. Abram sacrifices the animals and, it is noted in Genesis 15:11 that vultures descended on the carcasses. Abraham had to drive them away. Such vile birds are often symbols of demons in Scripture. There were no doubt demons present during Jesus’ sacrificial death on the cross on a later Passover event, suggest the commentaries, among the crowd taunting Him to remove Himself from the cross as the prophesied Messiah would be expected to do.

And, while it is the middle of the day, the sun inexplicably goes down, and “a deep sleep fell upon Abram; and, lo, an horror of great darkness fell upon him,” we’re told in the next verse, just as darkness came at midday during Jesus’ crucifixion. Likewise, the conversation between God and Abram that preceded this event focused on God’s promise to make a great nation of Abram’s descendants, which would commence on the first Passover in Egypt centuries later. In Exodus 10:21-23, we also see that extreme darkness enveloped Egypt preceding the death of the Egyptian firstborn.

While the Exodus from Egypt represents the opening act of the fulfillment of the Abrahamic Covenant, Jesus death on the cross represents the closing act to which all other sacrifices pointed.

Coincidence? Or foreshadowing?

Yet, there’s still more in the Hebrew Scriptures tying together Abram’s experience, with the first Passover in Egypt, Jesus’ death and with the judgment on the Northern Kingdom of Israel in the time of the prophet Amos who wrote these words in Amos 8:8-10: “Shall not the land tremble for this, and every one mourn that dwelleth therein? and it shall rise up wholly as a flood; and it shall be cast out and drowned, as by the flood of Egypt. And it shall come to pass in that day, saith the Lord God, that I will cause the sun to go down at noon, and I will darken the earth in the clear day: And I will turn your feasts into mourning, and all your songs into lamentation; and I will bring up sackcloth upon all loins, and baldness upon every head; and I will make it as the mourning of an only son, and the end thereof as a bitter day.” (Emphasis added.)

Excuse me, but I am not willing to entertain the notion of pastors and teachers who suggest we should detach or “unhitch” ourselves from the Hebrew Scriptures because they are supposedly no longer relevant following Jesus’ resurrection. Jesus did not. Instead, the resurrected Jesus walked with two travelers on the road to Emmaus and revealed Himself to them in the only Scriptures of known at that time. He also spent 40 days with His closest disciples in His resurrected form with no record of ever suggesting the only known Scriptures were no longer relevant. Jesus’ apostles did not make any such suggestion, either. Instead, they preached for decades the risen Jesus and His “gospel of the Kingdom” from the only Scriptures recorded at that time. They also consistently warned those who heard their messages to measure what they said against the only Scriptures that existed during that time – the Hebrew Scriptures we call the Old Testament.

Lastly, Jesus said in Luke 16:17: “And it is easier for heaven and earth to pass, than one tittle of the law (Torah) to fail.”


Joseph Farah’s new book, “The Gospel in Every Book of the Old Testament,” is available now in digital e-book at Amazon.com and the WND Superstore. The hardcover edition will be released in September, but Special VIP Advance Reader Copies are available in the WND Superstore for a donation of $100 or more to support the massive first printing that will be necessary to meet early demand this fall.

Find out more about “The Gospel in Every Book of the Old Testament”:

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