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A company that provides database resources to public schools, including pornography embedded in computer files, is being sued by the Thomas More Society under Colorado’s Deceptive Trade Practices Act for boasting its products are age-appropriate.

“These databases definitely are not age-appropriate, nor can parents consider them reliable, as EBSCO claims,” said Matt Heffron, the organization’s senior counsel.

Along with EBSCO, the lawsuit names the Colorado Library Consortium, a tax-supported organization that “knowingly” brokers EBSCO’s “pornographic databases to schools and libraries,” the legal organization said.

Colorado law makes it illegal to make false claims to sell a product.

“This case is about two things: protecting children and calling out corporate deceit,” Heffron said. “EBSCO gets schools to purchase databases by falsely promising the databases are age-appropriate and specifically tailored for elementary, middle and high school children.”

WND reported last month the Cherry Creek School District in Colorado discontinued its contract with EBSCO after parents complained.

The information available to students included “How to have oral sex,” “How to have anal sex” and “How to have vaginal sex.”

The non-profit MassResistance discovered EBSCO works with 55,000 schools.

“We’ve often reported on the dramatic influx of ‘comprehensive sex-ed’ into schools across the country in recent years despite vocal outrage by parents,” the group said. “The graphic sexual content and LGBT tips that schools are pushing at students has been very disturbing for some time now, and is getting much worse.”

MassResistance said children attending middle schools in the Cherry Creek School District were “being given access to extremely graphic sexual and homosexual pornography, material encouraging them to become sexually and homosexually active, descriptions of ‘sex toys,’ and much more.”

MassResistance founder Brian Camenker said he was independently able to reproduce the results uncovered by the Cherry Creek parents.

He said that when the parents “presented samples of the pornography and other explicit sexual material found on the students’ portal to school officials and board members … the officials did not deny that that it is being made available to the middle school students.”

“They simply do not see a problem with it.”

See the full online report from MassResistance (Be warned that it contains explicit references, images.)

Camenker said the material included subjects such as “Ideas for erotic sex,” “Explicit sexuality information,” “Homosexual and transgender sex information,” “Graphic homosexual short stories” and “BDSM – bondage and sexual sadomasochism.”

One accessed article was called “Orgasms for All.” A lesson instructs, “So lock the door, grab a hand mirror, and let’s inspect your ittiest bits.”

An interactive page states: “Arrange the steps required to apply a condom by clicking and dragging each condom in its right position.”

A graphic says: “you could … suck, kiss, touch, bite, fondle, nibble, squeeze, and lick someone’s … kiss for a long time, using lots of tongue … have sex in front of mirrors … get into role play (for instance, tie someone up) … look at sexy pictures and videos … talk dirty … strip down … shower together.”

Yet another instruction talks about exhibitionism: “We’re talking all types. Flashing, sex in a public place, sex in a private place with open drapes, wearing a skirt but no underwear. (Um, meaning her. Generally.) ‘The thrill of being viewed has a lot to do with getting attention,’ says Queen. ‘For women, it’s a sort of centering experience that makes them realize they have attractiveness and erotic energy, even if they don’t look like Lindsey Lohan.”

At that time, district spokesman Tustin Amole told WND the district instructs students not to follow inappropriate links, because it would be “a violation of the Network Resource Acceptable User Waiver.”

“This is not the internet, as some school officials have falsely stated,” explained Heffron. Instead, EBSCO controls and limits the content of its databases marketed to schools. The curated databases are simply initially accessed through the internet.

“That control of the databases is why parents can expect the databases to be safe for their children at school,” he said. “They should not be infested with adult sexual fantasies.”

Heffron and the Thomas More Society are representing Pornography is Not Education, a Colorado group that includes parents who are “understandably outraged” at what they have discovered, said Heffron.

Due to the materials discovered by the Colorado parents, the National Center on Sexual Exploitation named EBSCO to both its 2017 and 2018 “Dirty Dozen List” of the worst 12 corporations in America that perpetuate sexual exploitation, the legal team said.

The lawsuit challenges the company for including bondage, discipline, sadomasochism stories in a summer reading list, links to a company hosting video pornography, links to “sexual positions” and “sex toys” pages.

“It is against the law to ply children with pornography,” explained Heffron. “If the local convenience store or movie theater can’t do it, why should EBSCO and the Colorado Library Consortium be allowed to get away with it?”

The complaint charges: “At all times material, EBSCO has known its research databases specifically targeting school children have contained, and continue to contain, substantial amounts of easily accessibly, sexually explicit material, which is obscene with respect to minors and/or is harmful to minors, as these terms are legally defined.”

The company, based in Massachusetts with corporate offices in Alabama, also provides to children outside links to “sex toy shops, to porn sites, to misogynistic materials espousing violence toward woman and to ‘torture-porn’ sites, among other sites.”

The complaint cites a long list of state and federal laws the provision of porn to children violates.

Why provide porn to kids?

“Because EBSCO makes more money by doing so,” the filing charges.

The lawsuit seeks an order to stop the porn from being delivered to children and to stop claims that the databases are “age-appropriate.”

Also, it seeks $500 in damages for each instance of a violation of the Colorado Consumer Protection Act, along with attorneys fees and costs.

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