President Donald Trump addresses a joint session of Congress on Feb. 28, 2017

President Donald Trump addresses a joint session of Congress on Feb. 28, 2017

Democratic Rep. Jerrold Nadler has said he wants to investigate President Trump and Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

And he likely soon will be doing that, with Democrats projected to gain the 23 seats needed to become the majority in the U.S. House.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi hopes to become speaker again, though many Democratic candidates, particularly in states Trump won, said they would not support her.

Nadler could become chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, and the New York Times teased that Nadler “could bring the president serious pain and potentially oversee his impeachment.”

The septuagenarian also would exert influence over writing laws on guns, immigration policy and voting rights. But he will have to deal with a GOP-controlled Senate, as well as President Trump’s potential veto pen.

Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings could become chairman of Oversight and Government Reform, and he claims he would not be “about trying to get any retribution.”

Rep. Maxine Waters, who has urged people to get in the faces of Trump administration officials in public could become chairman of the House Financial Services Committee.

Rep. Adam Smith could become chairman of Armed Services and already has said he wants to increase oversight.

And Rep. Adam Schiff, slated to become chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, has vowed to probe alleged Trump campaign-Russia collusion.

The committee already has concluded there’s no evidence of collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign, but Democrats insist the probe was superficial.

Some analysts have said that if the Democrats win control of the House and resist President Trump, it could end up helping Trump’s re-election chances in 2020.

He would have a ready-made target, a Democrat-controlled House, to blame for obstructing progress.

While a Democratic House would block some of Trump’s plans, a GOP majority enables the president to continue restocking the American judiciary with judges that rule according to the Constitution rather than social agendas.

He’s already appointed dozens, including two justices on the Supreme Court, and has many more in the pipeline.

Republicans have picked up three seats in the Senate so far, defeating Democratic incumbents in Indiana, Missouri and North Dakota.

Former Florida Republican Gov. Rick Scott held a narrow lead over incumbent Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson.

Republican Rep. Ron DeSantis defeated Democratic Rep. Andrew Gillum in the Florida governor’s race by one point.

Trump on Monday admitted the GOP could lose control of the House.

“And do you know what you do? My whole life, you know what I say? ‘Don’t worry about it, I’ll just figure it out.'”

One Washington Post writer pointed out that Democrats in the House would “give Trump a boogeyman” and he would have “a ready-made foil for his 2020 re-election campaign.”

By 11:30 p.m. Eastern, ABC was reporting Democrats had won 209 seats and Republicans 190 had been elected to the House, making it clear that there would be no “blue wave” as Democrats had been promising for months.

Neither was there a “red wave” for the GOP, but the expansion of its majority in the Senate is significant for future Supreme Court nominations, with Brett Kavanaugh having been confirmed by a mostly partisan 50-48 margin.

Sen. Joe Manchin was the lone Democrat to back Kavanaugh, and his yes vote is believed to have put him over the top in a hotly contested race.

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