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Decade since Al Gore predicted ice-free Arctic in 5-7 years

Thursday marks the 10th anniversary of former Vice President Al Gore’s prediction that within five to seven years, it was likely that the North Polar Ice Cap would be completely free of ice during some months of the summer.

The Gateway Pundit blog recalled Gore’s remarks to the United Nations Climate Change in Copenhagen on Dec. 13, 2009, referencing computer models by scientists.

“Some of the models suggest that there is a 75 percent chance that the entire north polar ice cap, during some of the summer months, could be completely ice-free within the next five to seven years,” said Gore.

However, according to the Danish Meteorological Institute, there has been no trend in Arctic sea ice for the past 12 years.

In January 2006, Gore promoted warnings of a “true planetary emergency” due to global warning, stating that “within the next 10 years, the world will reach a point of no return.”

Nevertheless Gore is still widely regarded as the Paul Revere of global warming. He will host a 24-hour broadcast special on climate change Dec. 20 featuring celebrities such as Moby and the Goo Goo Dolls.
“24 Hours of Reality: Protect Our Planet, Protect Ourselves” will be televised in more than 125 countries.

Gore’s 2006 Oscar-winning film “An Inconvenient Truth” spread his message of impending global cataclysm. But a decade after it debuted, the Blaze found that eight of his key dire predictions didn’t come to pass:

  1. Sea levels could rise 20 feet with the melting of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets: Sea levels have increased at the same rate as when they were first recorded. The South Pole is gaining more ice than it’s losing. And Greenland’s melting cycle appears to be regular.
  2. CO2 is the control knob for temperature: Satellite data have shown no increase in average global temperature for two decades despite a constant increase in CO2. The Sun, meanwhile, appears to be a more likely cause, with scientists noting the Sun has been “quieter” over that period of time.
  3. Hurricane Katrina was man-made and the new normal: After Hurricane Wilma in 2005, the U.S. experienced the longest stretch ever recorded of no Category 3 hurricanes landing on its soil.
  4. Severe tornadoes are increasing: F3+ tornadoes have been declining for more than 60 years. The overall number of tornadoes had been unusually low in the previous three years. An overall upward trend can be explained by new technology to detect them.
  5. Polar bears are dying: There are more polar bears now than when Al Gore was born.
  6. The Arctic is melting: It was gaining ice, and 2015 saw the largest refreezing in more than a decade.
  7. The Sahel in Africa is drying up: The region south of the Sahara desert had gained the most flora density since the advent of satellites.
  8. CO2 is pollution: Agriculture benefits from CO2, which acts as an airborne fertilizer that increases plant growth and causes plants to need less water.

 ‘Torqued-up’ claims

Gore recently admitted in an interview with PBS that the latest claims by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are “torqued up” to “get the attention of policy-makers around the world.”

When his sequel to “An Inconvenient Truth” illustrated sea water reaching the site of the 9/11 Memorial, as he had predicted, he used footage of Superstorm Sandy.

“Ten years ago, when the movie ‘An Inconvenient Truth’ came out, the single most criticized scene was an animated scene showing that the combination of sea-level rise and storm surge would put the ocean water into the 9/11 memorial site, which was then under construction. And people said, ‘That’s ridiculous. What a terrible exaggeration.'”

The movie then shows news footage of Superstorm Sandy water reaching the memorial site.

But Newsbusters pointed out the original prediction “was not about extenuating circumstances of a storm like Sandy slamming into New York or any ‘storm surge’ at all.”

“It was about the sea level rise that would be generated as (he predicted) ice melt in Greenland and Antarctica escalated dramatically.”