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Amazon is banning the sale of certain items carrying verses from the Quran written in Arabic calligraphy – and a Hamas-tied U.S. pressure group is behind the move.

According to the Council on American-Islamic Relations, the No. 1 retailer in the world is dropping the sale of products presumably purchased and used by Muslims but done so in violation of CAIR’s brand of Islamic Shariah law.

The products include doormats, bath mats and others that include Quranic verses like, “In the name of Allah the merciful and compassionate.” It’s not the message that’s the problem in the eyes of CAIR, but the medium.

Because the verses will be stepped on, CAIR doesn’t approve.

A unicorn-themed pillow case marketed by Emvency

A unicorn-themed pillow case marketed by Emvency

National Executive Director Nihad Awad thanked Amazon for policing its brand of Wahabbi-style Shariah law ensuring that Muslim consumers will no longer be able to purchase what CAIR considers apostate products.

In this case, the products are manufactured and sold by Emvency, which produces bath and home products of all kinds, with messages it determines appeal to Christians, Muslims, Jews, pagans and even unicorn lovers.

But no longer will the Islamic bath mats and doormats be sold through Amazon – whether Muslim consumers like the decision or not.

Awad inferred the products were being sold to in the name of “spreading Islamophobia.” But there is no evidence to suggest either the manufacturer had designed the products with that in mind or that consumers were buying them for such a purpose.

“This appears to be an internecine Muslim dispute,” said one source familiar with the products. “Some Muslims are buying them, creating the market for them, and other Muslims object to the use of the products. It has nothing to do with hatred of Muslims. No one using a bath mat with Quranic verses written in calligraphy to show contempt to Muslims.”

CAIR also called for a boycott of a Nike show with a logo that resembled the Arabic word for “Allah.” Nike pulled the show in deference to the terror-linked CAIR.

No word from Emvency on whether the company will drop distribution of such Islamic-inspired products.

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