franklin-graham

Evangelist Franklin Graham rejects the assumption that media fact-checkers are always right, especially when they accuse President Trump of lying.

“Has he misspoken on some things? Sure. All of us do it. You do it and I do it,” he said in a recent interview with MSNBC.

MSNBC’s Craig Melvin began by asking what he believes is the “most important legacy” of his father, the late evangelist Billy Graham.

Franklin Graham, CEO of both Samaritan’s Purse and the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, said his father was faithful to preaching the gospel of Jesus Christ, that sin separates people from God, but God offers reconciliation through Jesus to those who accept Him.

“If a person did that then God would welcome them into heaven,” he said. “That was his legacy. We’re still doing that today.”

But the interview immediately turned political.

Melvin cited a recent commentary Franklin Graham had written about truth and noted a fact-checker has claimed President Trump has made 8,159 “false or misleading claims” in his first two years in office.

How does Graham reconcile that?

Graham pointed out there are fact-checkers for the president, “But I don’t know if you have a fact-checker for the media.”

Melvin interrupted Graham.

“You and I both know this president has said things over and over that aren’t true,” he said.

Graham replied: “I don’t know that. I don’t sit around and try to find every fault in the president every day, looking for everything he might have misspoken or mis-said. I don’t do that.”

Retreating, Melvin said, “But you can acknowledge the president has said things that aren’t true.”

“I don’t think the president is sitting there behind the desk trying to make up lies,” Graham said. “I don’t believe that for a second. Has he misspoken on some things? Sure. All of us do it. You do it and I do it.”

He said the president “is trying to do the best that he can under very difficult circumstances,” and since he was elected president, America owes him the effort of trying to work with him to fix the nation’s problems.

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