Buchanwald(gov)

Nazis were killing upward of 15,000 people per day for a period of three months at the worst of their genocide during World War II and only slowed down when potential victims became scarce, says a new report in Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin.

The estimate is the result of work by Lewi Stone, a mathematical biologist at the University of Tel Aviv in Israel.

According to Breaking Israel News, he wanted to find out the rate at which Holocaust victims were killed by Nazis.

Previously, researchers estimated  6,000 victims per day at Auschwitz.

“Stone focused his study on records of the ‘special trains’ used to transport people. Overall, some 480 train trips were made from 393 separate Polish towns, destined for death camps such as Belzec, Sobibor, and Treblinka. Though also used for extermination, Auschwitz was also a forced-labor camp,” the report said.

Stone said he uncovered a “three-month phase of hyperintense killing” that made clear the Nazis’ “pure focused goal of obliterating the entire Jewish people of occupied Poland in as short a time as possible.”

“Apart from very few exceptions, victims who were transported to the death camps were rapidly murdered upon arrival in the gas chambers, thus giving the system perfected by the Nazis all the characteristics of an automated assembly line,” Stone said in an interview.

For the rest of this report, and more, please go to Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin.

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