A male soccer player makes a dramatic play by jumping horizontally. He attempts to kick the ball with his feet. The stadium is dark behind him. Only the lights of the stadium shine brightly, creating a halo effect around the bulbs.

Two well-known world sports organizations, including FIFA, the governing body for soccer, are being criticized for allowing teams to mandate the promotion of LBGT themes in violation of their own rules.

The non-profit Let All Play points out the rules that FIFA and the International Football Association Board, IFAB, are violating when they display the LGBT rainbow.

“The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) rainbow does not belong on the kit or the field in soccer,” the organization says. “In international soccer matches, the United States and the Republic of Ireland have required players to wear an LGBT rainbow on their jerseys. England required players to wear LGBT rainbow laces on their cleats. Some teams have required captains to wear an LGBT rainbow captain’s armband.”

But that’s a problem, the report explains.

“The LGBT rainbow is a political symbol. The Laws of the Game from the International Football Association Board (IFAB) state, ‘Equipment must not have any political, religious or personal slogans, statements or images’ (Law 04.5). FIFA’s Equipment Regulations add that this includes a ban on any ‘political or comparable symbol.’

“FIFA needs to enforce its own rules,” the group says.

That’s because no everyone “agrees with the causes represented by the LGBT rainbow.”

“Players who have declined to wear the LGBT rainbow in international and league play have been harassed and now risk being disadvantaged in their careers.”

The Christian Institute pointed out FIFA previously was criticized for banning the wearing of a poppy in international matches, branding it political.

But it has never enforced a ban on the LGBT flag.

The report said teams that place political symbols on equipment need to be disciplined.

The homosexual pride flag was created by gay rights campaigner Gilbert Baker in the 1970s.

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