President Donald Trump (White House photo)

President Donald Trump (White House photo)

When President Trump was a candidate in 2016, he vowed to support the right of evangelical Christians to express their beliefs and to oppose abortion.

Since his election, fulfillment of some of his promises have made headlines, including the release of pastor Andrew Brunson, who was imprisoned in Turkey on bogus, politically motivated charges.

Trump also appointed two justices to the Supreme Court who have created a conservative majority that could overturn the Roe v. Wade decision that established a right to abortion.

But other such efforts by the president have been behind the scenes.

Such as the one revealed recently by his chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney.

The Daily Caller News Foundation reported Trump routinely asks world leaders who visit the White House what they are doing for religious minorities.

“What you don’t know about is what goes on behind closed doors,” Mulvaney said recently at the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast in Washington.

“I very rarely talk about my private meetings with the president, the stuff that goes on what goes on outside the private eye, but I can assure you that I have been sitting with him in the Oval Office, in the cabinet room, with leaders around the world, where he will look at them and say ‘Now, you’re not doing enough to take care of the Christians in your country,’ or, ‘Thank you for helping Christians in your country.'”

Mulvaney, a special guest speaker at the breakfast as a Catholic leader, said Trump frequently has addressed the problem of persecution of Christians and other religious minorities.

“Mulvaney referenced the first-ever State Department Ministerial to Advance Religious Freedom attended by 600 people from around the world as well as President Trump’s role in the release of Pastor Andrew Brunson from his two-year imprisonment in Turkey,” the report said.

“That’s pretty powerful stuff, to be a leader of a foreign nation sitting in the Oval Office with the president of the United States and have him say, ‘Look, I need you to do more to help religious minorities,'” Mulvaney said.

It’s an issue, he said, that “hasn’t been articulated in the Oval Office in way too long.”

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