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Instagram removed a comic strip comparing justifications for abortion with justifications for slavery in the 19th century because it violated the Facebook-owned company’s “Community Guidelines.”

Adam Ford said he posted the comic a week and a half ago on Instagram then, after a day, thought nothing of it until he received a notice, according to the Christian Daily Reporter.

Instagram said: “Your Post Has Been Deleted. We removed your post because it doesn’t follow our Community Guidelines on hate speech or symbols. If you violate our guidelines again, your account may be restricted or disabled.”

A bewildered Ford wrote on the Christian Daily Reporter: “Please, read the entire comic and try to ponder how in the world it could be considered ‘hate speech.'”

Ford said he’s “hardly the first person to espouse the belief (and hope) that one day society will look back on abortion with the same mortified disbelief we now have when we consider our country’s history of institutionalized chattel slavery.”

“Millions and millions of pro-life Americans — of all races — see the heartbreaking similarities between abortion-on-demand and the forced enslavement of human beings,” he wrote.

He said there is “no way any human being could believe my comic is promoting slavery, since the two women talking are clearly identified as living 200 years ago, and the woman on the right is clearly the ‘bad guy.'”

Ford wondered whether or not Instagram considers it “hate speech” to “contend for the humanity and personhood of the unborn.”

It’s clear, he said, that if he had used the comic to promote abortion, it would not have been removed.

See the comic Instagram removed as “hate speech”:

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WND reported Twitter shut down the account of the pro-life movie “Unplanned” over its opening weekend, deleting 50,000 followers in the process. Twitter later attributed the shutdown to an “error.”

In February, Instagram deleted a post of Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s Texas Bar registration form on which she stated she was an “American Indian,” calling the post “harassment or bullying.”

WND reported Warren wrote in her own hand on a 1986 registration for the Texas Bar that her race was “American Indian.” That apparently conflicts with her claims that she never identified herself as Native American for professional purposes.

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