U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. (Senate video screenshot)

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. (Senate video screenshot)

Spending plans proposed or backed by U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., total up to $129 trillion, according to an analysis by the Washington Free Beacon.

Warren, who jumped into the race for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination with more than 20 candidates, has promised to back the Green New Deal and its $94 trillion estimated cost over 10 years, the Free Beacon pointed out, and the Medicare for All concept, at another $32.6 trillion.

Assuming a U.S. population of about 330 million, that would amount to just under $400,000 per man, woman and child.

“Three of Warren’s major proposals alone cost $2.365 trillion: opioids ($100 billion), canceling student debt and offering free public college ($1.25 to $1.565 trillion), and universal child care ($700 billion),” the analysis said.

Meanwhile, her plan for covering those costs is an “ultra-millionaire” tax of 2 percent on Americans worth $50 million or more, and 3 percent on those worth $1 billion.

She claims that would raise about $2.75 trillion over 10 years.

Her own spending plans include fighting opioid abuse at a cost of $100 billion.

Then she wants to offer free public college and cancel college loans up to $50,000 for some 45 million people.

“The Urban Institute guessed the actual cost of forgiving debts was $955 billion, which would raise the price for the proposal to $1.565 trillion,” the analysis said.

Heritage Foundation education policy expert Lindsey Burke told the Free Beacon the clear winners would be universities.

Lastly, the analysis showed, Warren’s plan for universal child care would cost $700 billion.

The Green New Deal, which originated with socialist Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s, D-N.Y., calls for a complete overhaul of transportation, infrastructure and more across the United States.

Ocasio-Cortez was widely was mocked for posting a summary of the plan that said it would provide income for people “unwilling to work.”

Warren is also a co-sponsor of Sen. Bernie Sanders’ I-single-payer, Medicare for All legislation, which one study estimated would boost government spending by $32.6 trillion over 10 years,” the analysis said.

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