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Starbucks has eliminated WiFi porn at its 8,500 company-owned stores across the United States, according to an internet safety organization.

“Now, when a customer logs in to a Starbucks-owned location’s WiFi, the following message appears when a patron attempts to view inappropriate content: ‘Access to this site has been blocked,'” said the activist group Enough is Enough.

The non-profit organization, which campaigns for filters and other restrictions to protect children from porn, said Starbucks is joining McDonald’s, Chick-fil-A and Panera Bread in “demonstrating their commitment to provide safe and secure WiFi resulting in a family friendly environment.”

The organization said Starbucks made a public commitment to the move last year.

“We are pleased that Starbucks is now filtering both its coffee and its public WiFi,” said EIE President Donna Rice Hughes.

“This is a tremendous victory for children, families and patrons. Parents can now have peace of mind, knowing that when their kids go to Starbucks, they will have a safer WiFi experience,” she said.

Hughes said the details of the program were shared with her by company officials.

“We are hopeful that Starbucks’ demonstration of corporate responsibility and commitment to children and family safety will be a beacon to other businesses and institutions to follow suit,” she said.

Other venues, ranging from entertainment sites to religious institutions and universities, still are being encouraged to joint the Safe WiFi movement that filters porn and child porn from their internet access points.

One institution that rejected the idea was the University of Notre Dame.

“In 2018, EIE contacted the Notre Dame’s administration to heed the call of its students requesting they filter pornography from its campus WiFi. In response, the university’s president indicated Notre Dame would not be filtering, recommending instead students ‘adopt filters voluntarily,'” the organization said.

“By implementing a safe WiFi policy and effective filtering, businesses and institutions can better prevent the unintended consequences of unfiltered WiFi by blocking harmful and illegal content which in turn supports parents’ efforts to protect their kids online, deters sexual predators from illegal use of public WiFi, maintains a positive work and school environment, protects the company/school brand from negative publicity resulting from the misuse of WiFi and ensures corporate best practices,” Hughes explained.

EIE’s National Safe WiFi program began in 2014.

“Companies, like Starbucks, McDonald’s and Chick-fil-A who filter WiFi from pornography and child pornography qualify to join the ‘Friendly WiFi’ certification program — the equivalent of the Good Housekeeping™ seal of approval in the digital age – which allows them to advertise that their public WiFi is safe,” Hughes said.

WND reported earlier this year that pressure was put on Starbucks because it had not yet implemented the program.

Hughes noted a sex offender had been caught at an Altamonte Springs, Florida, Starbucks.

“Authorities were able to track him because he was using their free WiFi,” Rice said.

“He was reported to have a laptop and five cell phones in his possession at the time of his arrest.”

“This isn’t rocket science,” she said at the time. “These tools have existed for years, but they won’t work if they are not implemented. It’s time for Corporate America and institutions offering public WiFi to voluntarily offer safe and secure WiFi. It just makes good business sense.”

EIE had warned Starbucks that having sex offenders in the company stores could be problematic.

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