The Obama presidency left many victims behind but none more aggressively conspicuous than Nike poster child Colin Kaepernick.

The former San Francisco 49er quarterback forced his way back into the news this week with his reported demand that Nike pull its sneaker line adorned with a Betsy Ross flag. According to the Wall Street Journal, Kaepernick and comrades found the sneakers “offensive.”

If so, what a hellish day Fourth of July must be for these people, every firework display a cruel reminder of a time before abortion on demand, subsidized transgender surgery and million-dollar shoe contracts.

What is particularly noteworthy about the Kaepernick protest is its Bizarro World nature. Had he launched the protest two years into the Trump presidency, he could have made some sort of statement, however misguided.

But no, Kaepernick launched his resistance movement in August 2016, the eighth year of the Obama presidency with Hillary a sure shot to succeed him. Just whom did Kaepernick think he was resisting?

“I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color,” said the biracial adopted son of a white Christian family.

“To me, this is bigger than football, and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.”

Yes, there were bodies in the street, but how they got there was a mystery to Kaepernick. During the two-year murder spike that alarmed Kaepernick, black people were heading the country that “oppresses black people and people of color.”

African Americans were president and attorney general – and had been for the previous six years – and Democrats headed every major city in America.

It was hard to know who Kaepernick thought could fix the problems that troubled him. It certainly was not Barack Obama.

With the media celebrating every seeming injustice, many of them as transparently fake as Jussie Smollett’s, the police nationwide stopped policing aggressively, and the thugs moved in.

Obama all but encouraged the mayhem that followed. In 2016, there were 3,000 more murders than in 2014. An estimated 1,800 of the victims were black, virtually all of them murdered by other black people.

It was not necessarily coincidental that the murder rate leveled off as soon as Obama left the White House and declined substantially the following year. The media, however, will spare Kaepernick this update just as they will spare him the news that Obama flew the Betsy Ross prominently at his 2013 inauguration.

Although Obama was not strategist enough to plan the unrest, his comrades were. From the left’s perspective, an angry base was one motivated to vote.

In 2018, still stoking the rage generated by the false reporting around the 2012 Trayvon Martin shooting – election year, battleground state – black underdog Andrew Gillum upset his moderate opponents in the Florida Democratic primary and very nearly won the Florida governorship.

Perversely, Nike is using much the same strategy as Gillum. They channel the rage to sell sneakers. It would not surprise me if the most recent controversy was planned.

As insecure in his blackness as his president, Kaepernick gives this self-destructive movement – and sneaker campaign – a face. One day he may realize just how badly he has been played.

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