U.S. Air Force Airmen of the 407th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal team conducts a controlled detonation on Ali Air Base, Iraq, Nov. 14, 2007. The Airmen unloaded just under 1,800 pounds of expired munitions to ensure they will not be used against U.S. forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Snyder) (Released)

U.S. Air Force Airmen of the 407th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal team conducts a controlled detonation on Ali Air Base, Iraq, Nov. 14, 2007. The Airmen unloaded just under 1,800 pounds of expired munitions to ensure they will not be used against U.S. forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Snyder) (Released)

Racing fans at the Indianapolis 500 this year apparently were safer than ever before, even if they didn’t know it, reports Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin.

It’s because the federal government deployed for the first time an advanced network of sensors that watched for “any potential weapon of mass destruction” or terror.

That included any radiological, chemical or biological threats.

Officials with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency said the “behind the scenes” network of sensors kept constant vigilance over the 300,000 fans at the race.

It was “the first time that DARPA’s SIGMA+ network seamlessly integrated radiological and chemical sensors with biological threat sensors from the Department of Homeland Security’s Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction (CWMD) Office.”

“The Indy 500 provided an excellent venue to demonstrate our ability to provide a composite threat picture across all modalities – radiation/nuclear, chemical, and biological,” said Mark Wrobel, SIGMA+ program manager in the agency’s Defense Sciences Office.

“The SIGMA+ network enabled real-time alerts of possible threats to be overlaid on a digital map of the raceway, so security staff could identify, with high accuracy, the type and location of a potential WMD or WMT threat.”

For the rest of this report, and more, please go to Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin.

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