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The American Psychological Association has been known for taking extreme positions on health issues and lifestyle choices, such as its “guidelines for practice with men and boys,” as columnist Dennis Prager pointed out.

The document asserts “traditional masculinity” is harmful, and “it is entirely normal for a boy … to wear a dress.”

Now, the APA is advocating that “swingers” — who routinely exchange sexual partners among themselves — become a legally protected class with special rights and privileges.

Liberty Counsel, known for defending religious and civil rights in court, said APA has created a task force “to refute monogamous marriage and to normalize ‘consensual non-monogamous’ relationships.”

APA has an online petition to make “consensual non-monogamy” a “legally protected class” to “avoid discrimination in employment, housing, etc.”

Liberty Counsel pointed out the task force needs a communications coordinator to “engage with the online CNM (Consensual Non-Monogamy) groups.”

The Task Force on Consensual Non-Monogamy says it “promotes awareness and inclusivity about consensual non-monogamy and diverse expressions of intimate relationships. These include but are not limited to: people who practice polyamory, open relationships, swinging, relationship anarchy and other types of ethical, non-monogamous relationships,”

Liberty Counsel noted APA postings included the statement: “Before I die I want to normalize consensual non-monogamy.”

“The APA, which has over 110,000 members, continues to allow a small group of sex anarchists to define its positions on sexuality, instead of being a source for objective scientific information on sexuality or gender,” Liberty Counsel said.

According to APA’s official description of the initiative: “Finding love and/or sexual intimacy is a central part of most people’s life experience. However, the ability to engage in desired intimacy without social and medical stigmatization is not a liberty for all.'”

APA’s literature features the work of Alfred C. Kinsey, the late Indiana University professor who became known as “the father of the sexual revolution” by claiming most men of “the Greatest Generation” following World War II were perverts.

The problem the APA wants to address, according to Heath Schechinger who is co-chair of the task force, is the lack of support from the swinger community.

“Too many clients who are in CNM relationships have to educate their therapists. Too many of them discontinue therapy because their therapist judged them, didn’t know enough about CNM to be helpful, or worse, makes actively stigmatizing comments,” he stated.

Liberty Counsel’said the new task force is following the same path “as the one APA created to conduct a ‘systematic review of the peer-reviewed journal literature on sexual orientation change efforts (SOCE) and concluded that efforts to change sexual orientation are unlikely to be successful and involve some risk of harm, contrary to the claims of SOCE practitioners and advocates.'”

Instead of an objective committee, six of seven members identified as LGBT.

“The seventh engaged in homosexual activism before selection for the task force,” Liberty Counsel said.

Further, they admitted to being opposed to the fact that counseling can help people struggling with same-sex desires and behavior.

Rejected by APA were “five qualified practitioners of talk therapy who applied” to participate.

Officials claimed, “They were not rejected, they just were not accepted.”

In fact, WND reported in 2004 the seven-member APA panel adopted a resolution that said, “Prohibiting civil marriage for same-sex couples is discriminatory and unfairly denies such couples, their children and other members of their families the legal, financial and social advantages of civil marriage.”

One of the most controversial members was Candace A. McCullough, a lesbian who attempted in 2002 to produce, for the second time, a deaf child by artificial insemination, using sperm from a deaf donor.

McCullough and her lesbian partner, Sharon Duchesneau, are deaf. Their attempt to create a second deaf baby was profiled by the Washington Post on March 31, 2002.

“It would be nice to have a deaf child who is the same as us,” Duchesneau, who carried the baby to term, told the Post two months before the baby boy, named Gauvin, was born.

“I think that would be a wonderful experience. You know, if we can have that chance, why not take it?”

They succeeded, according to the Advocate, the national gay and lesbian news magazine, which disclosed in 2002 that Duchesneau and McCullough previously sought a deaf sperm donor to father their daughter, Jehanne, as well as their son.

“As a result,” says the Advocate report, “Jehanne is deaf, and Gauvin is deaf in one ear and has severe hearing loss in the other. And that’s what both mothers – who consider their deafness an identity, not a disability – intended.”

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