‘Every’ child should have puberty blockers, says transgender radical

By Bob Unruh

(Image by Alexas_Fotos from Pixabay)

Reacting to the U.K. Supreme Court’s ruling that children can’t give informed consent to be put on “sex-change” drugs, a transgender activist is offering a radical solution.

Put all children on puberty blockers, tweeted YouTuber Zinnia Jones, also known as Lauren McNamara.

“If children can’t consent to puberty blockers which pause any permanent changes even with the relevant professional evaluation, how can they consent to the permanent and irreversible changes that come with their own puberty with no professional evaluation whatsoever?” she wrote.

Zinnia, who identifies herself as “adult demon female,” said an “inability to offer informed consent or understand the long-term consequences is actually an argument for putting every single cis and trans person on puberty blockers until they acquire that ability.”

She scolded anyone who disagrees.

“For the record, I understand that y’all just aren’t capable of wrapping your heads around something like this, because if you could, then you wouldn’t be the way you are. It’s probably best to step away and have a juice box, this is beyond your level. Natal puberty became optional the moment technology became available to enable deliberate choice between natal puberty and puberty induced by cross-sex hormones. It became a choice when it *became a choice* and I am really profoundly sorry if you cannot understand that.”

The Washington Examiner reported Jones runs a blog called Gender Analysis.

The comments came after the United Kingdom’s high court ruled children 16 and under will be protected from life-altering transgender drugs because they generally lack the understanding to make a competent decision.

The ruling came in 23-year-old Keira Bell’s lawsuit against the National Health Service’s Gender Identity Development Service after she was given hormone blockers and cross-sex hormones as a teen, noted the U.K.’s Christian Institute.

She now is “detransitioning” back to her birth gender.

The judges found it “highly unlikely” that children 13 and under ever could genuinely consent to hormone blockers, which are prescribed routinely by health caretakers facilitating children in transgender agendas.

It would be “very doubtful” children 14 and 15 could as well. And older teens may lack competency.

But the NHS in recent years has prescribed the drugs for dozens of children.

The ruling said: “A child under 16 may only consent to the use of medication intended to suppress puberty where he or she is competent to understand the nature of the treatment. That includes an understanding of the immediate and long-term consequences of the treatment, the limited evidence available as to its efficacy or purpose, the fact that the vast majority of patients proceed to the use of cross-sex hormones, and its potential life changing consequences for a child.

“There will be enormous difficulties in a child under 16 understanding and weighing up this information and deciding whether to consent to the use of puberty blocking medication. It is highly unlikely that a child aged 13 or under would be competent to give consent to the administration of puberty blockers. It is doubtful that a child aged 14 or 15 could understand and weigh the long-term risks and consequences of the administration of puberty blockers.

“In respect of young persons aged 16 and over, the legal position is that there is a presumption that they have the ability to consent to medical treatment. Given the long-term consequences of the clinical interventions at issue in this case, and given that the treatment is as yet innovative and experimental, we recognize that clinicians may well regard these as cases where the authorization of the court should be sought prior to commencing the clinical treatment.”

Lawyers acting for Bell had argued that young people have too little life experience to understand “the potentially devastating and lifelong consequences of taking the experimental ‘sex-swap’ drugs.”

Children, the three judges found, need to understand “the immediate and long-term consequences of the treatment, the limited evidence available as to its efficacy or purpose, the fact that the vast majority of patients proceed to the use of cross-sex hormones, and its potential life changing consequences for a child.”

They found children have “enormous difficulties” understanding and weighing the consequences.

Shortly after the ruling was released, the NHS confirmed the Tavistock and Portman Trust has “immediately suspended new referrals for puberty blockers and cross-sex hormones for the under-16s.”

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