Concentration camps for the sick? Lawmakers withdraw suggestion

By Bob Unruh

UPDATE Dec. 21, at 8:40 p.m. ET: This story has been amended to include updated information based on a fact check by Reuters. The update clarifies throughout story that legislation had been proposed several years ago, and repeatedly since then. It also confirms the original problem addressed was actually Ebola. And it notes that the sponsor said on Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2021, after WND’S report initially appeared, that he would request that the proposal be withdrawn for the upcoming legislative session. The original headline, “State lawmakers asked to approve concentration camps for the sick,” has also been amended to: “Concentration camps for the sick? Lawmakers withdraw suggestion.”

UPDATED VERSION:

When American mayors, governors and others want their populations to submit to various orders stemming from health issues, they face what they perceived as an obstacle: those individuals who simply would not follow orders.

But in the state of New York, a proposal actually was prepared for lawmakers to consider that would resolve that dispute.

The plan, originally proposed several years ago and for several years in a row, would have allowed authorities to simply determine who they wanted locked up – and then lock them up.

Reuters termed the report “misleading,” after sponsor Rep. N. Nick Perry said on Tuesday, after the reports were published, that he intended to remove the bill from the legislative calendar.

Reuters said he confirmed this in an email to the agency.

The bill actually would have allowed for the “removal and detention of cases, contacts and carriers who are or may be a danger to public health” during a public health emergency, and Perry conceived of the plan during the Ebola outrbreaks.

Reuters explained, “In a statement released in 2020, Perry said the bill had first been introduced after it was discovered that people infected with Ebola had entered the United States, although there were elements of the bill that could be applicable to the COVID-19 pandemic.”

It was initially proposed, then reintroduced in 2017-2018, 2019-2020, and 2021-2022, before Perry then conceded that he would ask for it to be withdrawn.

The plan has remained at the committee level of the legislative process.

The National Pulse had explained the proposed law would have allowed authorities to “remove and detain cases, contacts, carriers, or anyone suspected of presenting a ‘significant threat to public health.'”

The report explained, “Bill A416 presents a serious risk to the basic liberties of all Americans in the state of New York, including their right to choose whether or not to receive medical treatment and vaccinations related to thus far undetermined contagious diseases.”

The plan was for inmates to be taken to “a medical facility or any other [authorities] deem appropriate.”

It’s plan was for people, once behind locked doors, would be forced to “complete an appropriate, prescribed course of treatment, preventive medication or vaccination.”

The plan was posted online as recently as Monday night and would have allowed roundups of individuals to begin after a “detention order” is “posted in a conspicuous place.”

Those locked up would have been informed that they have a right to a hearing.

And authorities would have been required to offer to the prisoner that his or her friends and family be notified of the detention.

The plan continued, “A person who is detained in a medical facility, or other appropriate facility or premises, shall not conduct himself or herself in a disorderly manner, and shall not leave or attempt to leave such facility or premises until he or she is discharged …”

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ORIGINAL STORY:

(Pixabay)
(Pixabay)

When American mayors, governors and others wanted their populations to submit to COVID-19 lockdown and other orders, they were faced with what they perceived as an obstacle: those individuals who simply would not follow orders.

Now, in the state of New York, a proposal is being prepared for lawmakers to consider that would resolve that dispute.

A plan prefiled for the coming legislature would allow authorities to simply determine who they wanted locked up – and then lock them up.

The idea, cast as a “public health law,” is being prepared for the 2021-2022 legislature.

It would allow the governor or his appointee to decide that anyone who is sick and “may” pose a danger to another, “shall be detained in a medical facility or other appropriate facility or premises designated by the governor or his or her delegee…”

There wouldn’t be “forced” medication unless a court order allowed that, the proposal finds.

The National Pulse explained the proposed law would allow authorities to “remove and detain cases, contacts, carriers, or anyone suspected of presenting a ‘significant threat to public health.'”

The report explained, “Bill A416 presents a serious risk to the basic liberties of all Americans in the state of New York, including their right to choose whether or not to receive medical treatment and vaccinations related to thus far undetermined contagious diseases.”

Inmates will be taken to “a medical facility or any other [authorities] deem appropriate.”

The report continued, “Though the bill attempts to state that no one shall be held for more than 60 days, the language allows for court orders to waive this maximum detention time. After 60 days, the court is allowed an additional 90 days to consider the detention of an individual, a cycle that can last indefinitely per the opinion of the department.”

Once behind locked doors, the individuals would be forced to “complete an appropriate, prescribed course of treatment, preventive medication or vaccination.”

The proposal is vague, and suggests that its provisions could be used against anyone “the department believes has the capacity to ‘pose a threat in the future, such as those refusing to receive the COVID-19 vaccination.'”

The plan in New York allows roundups of individuals to begin after that a “detention order” is “posted in a conspicuous place.”

Those locked up will be informed that they have a right to a hearing.

And authorities will be required to offer to the prisoner that his or her friends and family be notified of the detention.

Inmates also are required to behave to the satisfaction of authorities.

“A person who is detained in a medical facility, or other appropriate facility or premises, shall not conduct himself or herself in a disorderly manner, and shall not leave or attempt to leave such facility or premises until he or she is discharged …”

Content created by the WND News Center is available for re-publication without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected].

SUPPORT TRUTHFUL JOURNALISM. MAKE A DONATION TO THE NONPROFIT WND NEWS CENTER. THANK YOU!

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