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Barack Obama with New Black Panther leader Malik Zulu Shabazz and a uniformed member of the New Black Panther Party at a march in Selma, Ala., in 2007 (BigGovernment.com)

Newly resurfaced photographs show President Obama appearing and marching with members of the New Black Panther Party as he campaigned for president in Selma, Ala., in March 2007.

BigGovernment.com posted the photographs, reporting the images were captured from a Flickr photo-sharing account before they were scrubbed.

The photos are reportedly featured in a book set to be released tomorrow by J. Christian Adams, the Department of Justice whistleblower in the New Black Panther Party, or NBPP, voter intimidation case.

The book is titled “Injustice: Exposing the Racial Agenda of the Obama Justice Department.”

Among the people visible in the pictures with Obama is NBPP Chairman Malik Zulu Shabazz, a defendant in the voter intimidation case that Attorney General Eric Holder dismissed in 2009.

Is it any wonder the White House wouldn’t prosecute the New Black Panthers? Read the newest Whistleblower issue, OBAMA’S DEPARTMENT OF INJUSTICE, and discover the depths of Washington corruption!

Also present was the Panthers’ “Minister of War,” Najee Muhammed.

While the photos present new evidence of a possible relationship between Obama and the controversial black extremist group, WND was first to report in March 2008 that Obama met Shabazz.


Barack Obama speaks from same podium as New Black Panther leader Malik Shabazz during campaign event in Selma, Ala., in 2007 (BigGovernment.com)

Speaking to WND, Shabazz boasted he met Obama when the politician attended the 42nd anniversary of the voting rights marches in Selma in 2007.

“I have nothing but respect for Obama and for his pastor,” said Shabazz, referring to Jeremiah Wright, Obama’s former pastor of nearly 20 years.

Shabazz said in 2008 that aside from promoting black rights, he also supports Obama because he may take what he called a “less-biased” policy on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

“I have hopes he will change the U.S. government’s position toward the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, because our position has been unwarranted bias. Time and time again the U.S. vetoed resolutions in the U.N. Security Council condemning [Israeli] human rights violation. … I hope he shifts policy,” Shabazz said.

But the extremist added he doesn’t believe Obama could change America’s policy regarding Israel very much, since, he said, “other, powerful lobbies” control U.S. foreign policy.

The NBPP is a controversial black extremist party whose leaders are notorious for their racist statements and for leading anti-white activism.

Shabazz himself has given scores of speeches condemning “white men” and Jews.

The NBPP’s official platform states “white man has kept us deaf, dumb and blind,” refers to the “white racist government of America,” demands black people be exempt from military service and uses the word Jew repeatedly in quotation marks.

Shabazz has led racially divisive protests and conferences, such as the 1998 Million Youth March in which a few thousand Harlem youths reportedly were called upon to scuffle with police officers and speakers demanded the extermination of whites in South Africa.


Malik Zulu Shabazz

The NBPP chairman was quoted at a May 2007 protest against the 400-year celebration of the settlement of Jamestown, Va., stating, “When the white man came here, you should have left him to die.”

He claimed Jews engaged in an “African holocaust,” and he has promoted the anti-Semitic urban legend that 4,000 Israelis fled the World Trade Center just prior to the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

When Shabazz was denied entry to Canada in 2008 while trying to speak at a black-activist event, he blamed Jewish groups and claimed Canada “is run from Israel.”

Canadian officials justified the action stating he has an “anti-Semitic” and “anti-police” record, but some reports pointed to what was termed a minor criminal history for the decision to deny him entry.

He similarly blamed Jews for then-New York Mayor Rudi Giuliani’s initial decision, later rescinded, against granting a permit for the Million Youth March.

The NBPP’s deceased chairman, Khallid Abdul Muhammad, a former Nation of Islam leader who was once considered Louis Farrakhan’s most trusted adviser, gave speeches referring to the “white man” as the “devil” and claiming that “there is a little bit of Hitler in all white people.”

In a 1993 speech condemned by the U.S. Congress and Senate, Muhammad, lionized on the NBPP site, referred to Jews as “bloodsuckers,” labeled the pope a “no-good cracker” and advocated the murder of white South Africans who would not leave the nation subsequent to a 24-hour warning.

All NBPP members must memorize the group’s rules, such as that no party member “can have a weapon in his possession while drunk or loaded off narcotics or weed,” and no member “will commit any crimes against other party members or black people at all.”

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